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REVEILLE 

VOLUME EIGHT 
THE YEAR BOOK 

OF THE CLASS OF 1912 



,yy ^ t. ; v*r yy -, jfc • w* y .>; j t > v 

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Published Annually by the SENIOR CLASS 
of MISSISSIPPI A. and M. COLLEGE 




as a slight memorial of our enduring 
affections, as an appreciation of his high 
ideals, as a trivial testimony of the 
indefatigable loyalty he has ever com- 
manded from the student bodies for 
many years, as a token of our regard 
for his unselfish heart, his morality, 
his unfailing courtesy, and his 
tributes in our behalf, this 
volume of "The Reveille" 
is dedicated. 




F o r e w o 



i 



N ORDER TO MAKE VOLUME VIII. OF THE REVEILLE A 
SUCCESS, WE HAVE ASKED AND OBTAINED THE CO-OPERA- 
TIOX OF ALL CLASSES IN COLLEGE, AS WELL AS THE MEM- 
BERS OF THE FACULTY. WE HAVE WORKED ON THIS 
VOLUME WITH ENERGY AND DETERMINATION, AND IN 
PRESENTING IT, WE ARE AWARE THAT IT IS NOT WHAT 
WE TRIED TO MAKE IT, OR WOULD LIKE TO HAVE IT, BUT 
WE TRUST THAT OUR CRITICS WILL NOT CAST IT ASIDE AS 
WORTHLESS. 

TO THOSE WHO HAVE NOT ATTENDED A. & M., THE 
PICTURES WILL GIVE AN INSIGHT INTO LIFE AT THE COL- 
LEGE; TO THOSE WHO HAVE, THEY WILL CALL UP MEMO- 
RIES OF HAPPY SCHOOL DAYS. THE STORIES AND VERSES 
FROM MEMBERS OF THE DIFFERENT CLASSES WILL SHOW 
THE VARIOUS STEPS IN THE MENTAL DEVELOPMENT OF 
THE STUDENTS. TAKEN AS A WHOLE, THIS BOOK REPRE- 
SENTS THE COLLEGE IN ALL THE DIFFERENT PHASES IN 
A WAY THAT NOTHING ELSE CAN, AND WE HOPE THAT 
WHEN THE 'l2 REVEILLE IS WEIGHED IN THE BALANCES 
OF PUBLIC OPINION, IT WILL NOT BE FOUND WANTING IN 
THE ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF A PUBLICATION OF ITS 
KIND. 

THE EDITORS. 



-^^^^.ThE- Revtollb* i©i&^^^^^" 



William Newton Logan, A. M., Ph. D. 

THE honored subject of this brief biographical sketch was born at Barbours- 
ville, Knox County, Kentucky, November 4, 1869. He is a descendant of 
refined cultured parents, who were active and prominent in the affairs of his 
native State. 

In his early youth, Mr. Logan's parents moved to Kansas and he obtained his 
elementary education in the common schools of the district. From the common 
schools, he went to the High School and was graduated from the Beloit High School 
in 1889. At this time, he began his work as a teacher and taught the District School, 
though continued his education by attending Campbell University. After teaching 
two years in the village schools, he was elected teacher of Science in the Beloit High 
School, from which he was graduated only three years before, but resigned in 1893 to 
enter the University of Kansas, where he excelled in scholarship and graduated in 
three years with the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts, thus leaving a 
brilliant record to his credit. 

While attending College his perservering energetic spirit showed itself, more and 
more, and he spent his vacation months in teaching Summer Schools and in work on 
Geological Surveys. At the completion of his College course, he was elected Superin- 
tendent of the City Schools of Pleasonton, Kansas ; but resigned this position at the 
end of two years to accept a Fellowship in the Geological Department of the Uni- 
versity of Chicago, where he could complete his University education and develop his 
talents doing research work. This graduate Fellowship was won over a large num- 
ber of worthy competitors and gave him a place of prestige and distinction in the Uni- 
versity from the very start in his graduate work. Rich success marked every step of 
his progress and his brilliant work in the Department of Geology was crowned with 
royal honors in 1900, when the degree of Doctor of Philosophy was conferred on him 
by the University of Chicago. 

Dr. Logan was next called to accept the Professorship of Geology and Miner- 
alogy at St. Lawrence University, Canton, New York; he held this position three 
years and in 1903 resigned to accept the position of Professor of Geology and Mining 
Engineering in the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Mississippi, which he has 
filled with great credit and distinction. In taking charge of this Department, he 
entered at once into the spirit of his work and soon identified himself with the condi- 
tion of the College, and took up the lines of Geological work needed to be done in the 
State and whicn would furnish valuable information and be highly beneficial to the 




WILLIAM NEWTON LOGAN, A. M., Ph. D. 



101& 



farming classes. His work and services in the Institution and the State have been 
entirely satisfactory to the College authorities from the very beginning and by his 
energy, skill, and perseverence, he has succeeded in building up his Department until 
it is one of the most popular and important Departments of the College. 

Dr. Logan has had wide experience as a Geologist in practical work: he was 
assistant on the Kansas State Geological Survey from 1895 t0 1897 and again in 
1900; he was collector for the Field Columbian Museum of Chicago in 1898; he was 
a member of the Wyoming Scientific Expedition in 1899; he was assistant on the 
New York Geological Survey in 1902; and he has been an assistant on the present 
Geological Survey of Mississippi since its inception, where his published bulletins will 
speak for themselves. He is a Geologist of national reputation and was honored for 
his scientific attainments by being elected a member of the Sigma Xi of the Univer- 
sity of Kansas ; an honor that has been conferred on few of its graduates. He is a 
member of the Geological Society of America, the Kansas Academy of Science, and 
other scientific bodies. His investigations and written papers and monographs cover 
various phases of the geology and mineralogy of Kansas, Colorado, Wyoming, South 
Dakota, New York, Mississippi, and other States. He has contributed many valuable 
articles to scientific journals and his writtings are quoted as authority in many of the 
standard text-books on geology. But his culture as a scholar is not limited to the field 
of geology, and he has contributed many acceptable articles to the standard literary 
magazines. 





FACULTY 



lvS>12 



Faculty and Instructors 

John Crumpton Hardy, M. A., LL. D., President of the College. 

William Howard Magruder, M. A., LL. D., Vice-President of the College and 
Professor of English. 

Buz M. Walker, M. Sc, Ph. D., Director of the School of Engineering and Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics. 

Washington Lafayette Hutchinson, M. Sc, Director of the School of Agri- 
culture and Professor of Agronomy. 

John Curtis Herbert, M. Sc, Professor of History and Civics. 

William Flowers Hand, M. Sc, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry and State Chemist. 

William Newton Logan, A. M., Ph. D., Professor of Geology and Mining 
Engineering. 

Joseph S. Moore, M. Sc, Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 

Peter Parley Garner, M. Sc, Director of School of Industrial Education. 

James Vance Bowen, Ph. B., Professor of Modern Languages. 

Henry Leland Noel, B. Sc, M. D., Professor of Anatomy and Physiology and 
College Surgeon. 

Harry B. Brown, A. M., Ph. D., Professor of Botany and Forestry. 

Alexander Beauregard McKay, B. Sc, Professor of Horticulture. 

Thomas C. Musgrave, ist Lieutenant 17th Infantry, U. S. Army, Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics and Commandant of Students. 

Edward Martin Ranck, V. M. D., Professor of Veterinary Medicine. 

Robey Wentworth Harned, B. S. A., Professor of Zoology. 

Clarence Erle Reid, B. S. in E. E., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Edward Read Lloyd, M. Sc, Director of the Experiment Station. 

Charles Edgar Ard, B. S., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

William Dean Chadwick, A. B., A. M., Professor of Physical Education and 
Director of Athletics. 

Robert Walter Gay, B. S., C. E., Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing. 

Richmond Lee Shields, B. S., A. B., Professor of Agriculture and Associate Pro- 
fessor of Aniaml Husbandry. 

Daxills Scoates, B. S., Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

C. A. Cobb, B. Sc, Professor of Extension. 

James Groesbeck Com an, B. Sc, Director of the Textile School. 

Fritz John Weddell, B. Sc, Associate Professor of English. 

Herbert Johnson Smith, B. Sc, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Christopher Randolph Stark, B. Sc, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Randall Churchill Carpenter, B. Sc, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering and Superintendent of Power Plant. 

Virgil William Bragg, Professor of Manual Training. 




FACULTY 



^^ggSSs^E-RE^BIULI^ 1@1&^SS^^"" 



Lucius Lamar Patterson, A. B., A. M., M. E., Professor of Physics. 

Whitman Davis, B. Sc, Librarian. 

Mathew Livinston Freeman, M. Sc, Associate Professor of Drawing. 

Alfred William Garner, B. Sc, Ph. M., Associate Professor of History. 

George Henry Brunson, A. M., Professor of Psychology and Sociology. 

Hugh Critz, B. Sc, Assistant Professor of Agronomy. 

George Gray Snow, M. Sc, Assistant Professor of Industrial Pedagogy. 

Frederic Davis Mellen, A. B., M. Sc, Assistant Professor of English. 

James Shook Wallace, B .Sc, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Simson Fried Blumenfeld, M. Sc, Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Berttrold Winfield Anspon, B. Sc, Assistant Professor of Horticulture. 

Andrew Maret Maxwell, B. Sc, Instructor in Bookkeeping. 

James Enoch McKell, B. Sc, Instructor in Manual Training. 

Harvey Dean McMurtray, B. Sc, Instructor in Physics. 

Alexander Harvey Shannon, A. B., M. A., Instructor in English. 

James Grey Stelzenmuller, B. S., C. E., Instructor in Drawing. 

Jasper Mixon Campbell, B. S., Instructor in Machine Shop Practice. 

Emmett Smith Porter, B. S., Instructor in Geology. 

William Franklin Kirkpatrick, B. E., B. Agr., Instructor in Poultry Husbandry. 

Carl Leake, Instructor in Manual Training and Director of the Band. 

Albert Lee Love, B. S., Instructor in English. 

Eugene Sumpter Towles, B. A., M. A., Instructor in English. 

Earley Cunningham Ewing, B. A., M. A., Instructor in Cotton Grading. 

Stanley Wright, B. A., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Fred. Leslie Elliot, B. S., Instructor in Chemistry. 

R. H. Pate, B. S., Director of Farmer's Institute. 

John Frederic Mangold, B. E., C. E., Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

C. E. Hayes, B. S., Instructor in Mathematics and Assistant Director of Athletics. 

Rufus Henry Fitzgerald, B. A., Y. M. C. A. Secretary. 

Harris Markham Findlay, A. B., M. A., Instructor in Modern Languages. 

H. P. Braeutigam, B. S., Instructor in Electrical Engineering. 

John M. Beal, B. S., Instructor in Botany. 

Henry Oscar Pate, B. A., Instructor in English and English Librarian. 

Marion Douglas Broadfoot, B. Sc, Instructor in Mathematics. 

Alfred Benjamine Butts, B. Sc, Instructor in History. 

John Rigg Vaughn, B. Sc, Instructor in Agriculture. 

Rufus Clinton Blocker, Instructor in English and Mathematics. 

Avery B. Dille, B. Sc, Fellow in Agronomy. 

Richard Huntington Abbey, B. Sc, Dairy Herdsman. 

Tip Gamble Morris. B. Sc, Foreman of Model Farm. 

Mrs. Rose Wilder, Hospital Nurse. 




1 1 



LE^ REY\BILL^ 1^)1^^^^^^^ 



REVEILLE STAFF 



Board of Editors 



B. 

H. 
E. 
C. 

T. 

J. 

A. 

C. 
J. 

M 
C. 

E. 

J. 

J. 

J. 



L. Field, Editor-in-Chief 
G. Harper, Business Manager 
W. Pope, Ex-Business Manager 
P. Barrett, Treasurer 
H. Casanova, Senior Editor 

M. Langston/ _ . „ .. 

F. Houston \ Literary Editors 

ROTHE [ .... „ .. 

C StoyI Athletlc Editors 

. D. Smith ) c , . . „,. 
A. BrewerJ ^ bscri P tl0n Ed lt ors 

G. Wade, Clubs and Organizations Editor 
V. Lobdell, Art Editor . • . 

R. Wooten, Assistant Editor-in-Chief . 
L. Prosser, Assistant Business Manager . 



1912 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1912 

1912 
1912 

1912 

1912 
1912 
1913 
1913 





U 




15 



3n jHnnortam 

2L ©asston 3Sass 

Class; '12 

Uieb, December 17th, 1911 

" 'Cho gone, 131c can ne'er forget; 
Dn all but person, he is totth us pet.' 



Samuel Vernon ikott 

Class '13 

Bieb, 3Tulp 3rb, 1911 

"<&i Hobtng anb QTenberness he hab bountiful 

share; 
iffltsscb 'pon earth, but #ob neebs htm there." 



ib 



1012 




JETTA DENNIS, Starkville, Miss. 

[ndustrial Pedagogy. 

"Jetta" has been our Co-ed for the past three 
years, having become a member of our class in 1909. 
As a student, she is unequalled, and her attractive 
manner has won for her the place of "Class 
Favorite." While here, she has never been known 
to lose her temper, but on the contrary, has a smile 
for everyone. We are justly proud of our Co-ed, 
for truly she has been an ornament to this famous 
class of 1912. Her favorite pastime is spending her 
leisure hours in the Library with a certain Lieu- 
tenant. 




'Jetta" 



17 



^^^^^Ih^RE^rMULE- l^l^^g^^ 





ARTHUR H. ALLEN, 



Boyle. Miss. 



Civil and Mining Engineering. 
Captain Co. "L." 

Arthur, better known as "Cub," claims to be an 
Arkansas Product, but residing in Mississippi at 
present, we are glad to claim him as our own. "Cub," 
having entered "Prep," has travelled a long, hard 
road, but each year he has surmounted all obstacles 
and made himself master of all he has studied. He 
is full of fun and there is not a man in the class who 
has more friends. A great admirer of the opposite 
sex. he expects to make his final choice very soon 
after graduation. Besides being an excellent stu- 
dent, he has taken deep interest in athletics. We 
wish him a happy and successful career. 

Class Football, '08-'09: Scrub. '09-'10; 'Varsity. '10- 
'12; Basketball, "08-'09; Swamp Rabbits. '09-'ll; Vice 
President. '11-'12; Junior Club; 1912 Club; M. A. S. 
E. Secretary, '10-T1; Mississippi Sabres, '11-'12; P. 
P. D. President. 'lO-'ll. 



'Cub' 



~^^^0O*JlK& Reveille- i^i&^^^g^" 




JOHN B. ALLEN.. 



Sidon, Miss. 



Agriculture. 



Second Lieutenant Company "L." 
"'Daddy" Allen is very quiet and has an easy-going 
manner. He always believed in going ahead to 
classes at times when others would "cut." He has 
had some trouble with his work, but we think he has 
made good use of his training. He is one of our 
few who came from the Delta, and is prepared to 
return and be a detriment to the boll weevil, which 
is so prevalent in that section. He encourages ath- 
letics, and is a pleasant associate. 

Dialectic Literary Society, '09-'10; Agricultural 
Club. '12; Leflore County Club; Vice-President, 
'11-'12. 




'Daddy' 



ig 



^^^^^^B- KE^DILI/B- i^>i&^^^^^ 





JOHN F. ALLEN. Toomsuba. Miss. 

Agriculture. 

Second Lieutenant and Quarter-Master First Bat. 

John has a characteristic way of his own. He is 
pleasant, generous, and perfectly harmless. He 
could be a favorite of the ladies, but from the tri- 
weekly appearance of certain missives from near(?) 
Meridian, we know there is no chance. This lad is 
especially opposed to hard study, but he generally 
lands with the crowd. John expects to return to 
his plantation if the lady is willing. 

Agricultural Club; Queen City Club; Lauderdale 
County Club; Saber Company. 



'John" 



20 



"^^^^^^TftE^REVraLDB* ^i^^^^^^ 




CLAY O. BAIRD. Kansas City. Mo. 

Electrical Engineering. 

Ex-Captain Company "H." 

Just where Clay hails form is a mystery, but for 
all practical purposes Kansas City will answer as 
well as any. Clay does not belong to the "National 
Society of Heart Breakers," but he has a little love 
spree on just the same, which we hope will terminate 
successfully for the "bride." His chief aim in life is 
to know all there is to be known about the science 
of Electrical Engineering, and if his present efforts 
prevail, he will succeed. We cannot say that he 
likes to study, but at times he becomes inspired and 
industriously applies himself for as much as ten 
minutes without a rest. The art of learning is 
natural with him, and he is one of our best men. 
Here's to you, "Old Boy"; may you not only make a 
great success in your calling, but also, some day. 
enjoy "All the comforts of a home." 

Captain Lee Guard; Mississippi Sabres; Mississippi 
Association Student Engineers; Secretary and 
Treasurer Cosmopolitan Club, '09-'10; President 
Junior Club. '10-'ll; Alabama Club: Tennis Club, 
'08-'09; German Club: Cotillion Club: Y. M. C. \.. 

'IIS IN 




"Clay' 



-^ns^ggSj^JhE- Rbv^iixi^ l^is^^a^r"" 





CLAUD P. BARRETT, Hesterville. Miss. 

Industrial Education. 

First Lieutenant Company "I." 

"Pedagogue" entered school' in 1906, and since that 
time he has spent a few years out in the world. He 
joined us in the Junior year and since then, with his 
serious though pleasant mien and philosophic jokes, 
he has won the love of all his classmates. "C. P." is a 
most diligent and painstaking student — he is an 
example of what can evolve by determination and 
untiring effort. This subject has been known to ad- 
mire one Normalite, but as yet, his heart is obviously 
unentangled. The gravest charge that we have 
'against "Pedagogue" is his sonorous nods in the 
section room. Expects to take charge of an Agri- 
cultural High School. 

Y. M. C. A., '06-'12; Upshaw Medal, '09; Philo- 
technic Literary Society, '06-'12; Anniversarian, '11- 
'12; Class Poet. '09; Freshman Contestant, '08, 
Junior Debater, '11; President Attalla County Club, 
'11-T2: Reflector Board, '12; Treasurer Reveille. '12. 



'Pedagogue" 



!£>!£ 




WILLIAM C. BEANLAND, Booneville. Miss. 

Civil and Mining Engineering. 

Captain Company "H." 

"Beans" came to us in our Freshman year and 
almost immediately won the affections of his class. 
lie has many sterling qualities and is one of the 
most fair-minded men in college. "Military" is his 
specialty ( ?), but he hnds plenty of time for his 
studies; also for some healthydooking letters which 
find their way home. He has a "noodle" of unusual 
capacity, and is very ambitious. He intends to be 
President of a great railway system — some day. 

Secretary Senior Class, '11-'12; Advisory Board, 
'11-'12; Philomathean Literary Society. '10-'ll; Y 
M. C. A., '09-'10: M. A. S. E., '10-'12; Mississippi 
Sabres, '11-'12: Cotillion Club, '10-'12: Class lia^e- 
ball, '08-'12: Prentiss County Club. '10-'12: Junior 
Club. '10-'12. 




'Beans' 



23 



^^gg^^E-RE^BILLB- 1© 12^jSSsg»r-*' 





JOHN EDWARD BERGMAN, Fayette, Miss. 

Industrial Education. 

First Lieutenant and Adjutant First Batallion. 

John, or "Berg," joined us in the Soph, year and 
quite a welcome addition has he made. John is a 
very consistent student, but finds an almost uncon- 
querable "Jonah" in mathematics. He has the esteem 
of all who know him; besides his ability as an 
orator. "Berg," with white hair and prepossessing 
manners, has won quite a reputation as a heart- 
smasher. His broad smile discloses the secret when 
he has been the recipitent of a fat "Billet-Doux." 
He expects to engage himself in the betterment of 
education in his native State. 

German Club; Lee Guard; Junior Club; Phi- 
lolethean Literary Society; Winner of Sophomore 
Medal; Vice-President Demostheneans, '12; Sabre 
Company, '12; Le Club Le Francais, '11-'12. 



'John" 



24 



101£ 




WILLIAM M. BOGGAN. Braxton. Miss. 

Agriculture. 

Private Company "D." 

"Bogue" entered the class three years ago. He is 
a real philosophic sort of a fellow. He never says 
anything unless he is spoken to, and one had better 
be careful how he speaks to him, or he will get eased 
"in." "Bogue" has been the source o: many funny 
jokes, but his military bearing cannot be reproached. 
As a football player, he has not attracted much at- 
tention; but you have missed much if you have not 
heard him sing a bass solo. As a student, he is very 
meritorious, and our best wishes go with him in the 
future. 




25 



-^^^JfrE^REVSMLLE* lOlS^Ssfig^ 





CLAUDE A. BREWER. McComb, Miss. 

Agriculture. 

Second Lieutenant Company "F." 

"Rusty" has gained renown while with us for his 
Demosthenean power, and has renresented the 
Dialectic Literary society several times during his 
four years. His work in the lecture room is as good 
and his fame along other lines is even greater. He 
is said to be very brutal to all animals, and we can 
certify that he is cruel to poultry and (Polar Bears). 
He was with "Ram" at McComb. and is always 
ready to tell how they crossed the deep waters be- 
fore the enemy. 

Anniversarian Dilectic Literary Society; Fresh- 
man Declamation; Sophomore Debate; Class Orator 
'08-'09: Alumni Debate. '10-'ll; P. P. D. Club 
Demosthenean Club; President Pike County Club 
Director Agricultural Club, Third Term, '11-'12 
Class Historian, '11-'12; Senior Debate; Saber Com 
pany: V. Al. C. A. 



'Rusty" 



26 



1£>12 




JAMES M. BRITT, Eupora, Mis,. 

Industrial Education. 

First Lieutenant Company "B." 

"John Silver" or "Red." as he is commonly called, 
was a Prep, here live years ago. "Red" has since 
then, proved to a worthy disciple of Peter Polly, be- 
ing a man of original ideas, a good student and hav- 
ing no delicacy in offering his opinion. "Silver" is 
no ladies' man, but has especially distinguished him- 
self in convincing Profs, and his indefatiguable love 
of Pedagogy. lie is well liked by his "classmates 
and though handicapped by sickness. John has al- 
ways brought up his part. He expects to graduate 
in June. 

V. M. C. A.: Philotechnic Literary Society; Le 
Club de Francais: Students' Educational Club: 1912 
Club. 



^7 



•^^g^^JhE-RE^BILLB- ISUa^^Sgr'^ 





JOHN WILSON CARPENTER. Starkville, Miss. 
Civil and Mining Engineering. 
First Lieutenant Company "K." 

"Johnnie." as we prefer to call him, is one of our 
most energetic and persistent boys, never giving up 
until the task is completed. If there is something 
in a lesson that he doesn't fully understand, that 
familiar expression, "Er 'Fessor," is sure to come 
forth, bringing with it the desired explanation. Few 
men among us have the power to make and keep 
friends as does John. He is one of the most popular 
men in our class, with the fellows and the fair ones 
as well. Although a member of good standing in the 
Engineering school, his highest ambition is to own 
and operate an improved farm where he can spend 
the remainder of his days near "Dad." Here's to 
you, John, wishing you a most successful career in 
whatever field you choose to labor. 

Y. M. C. A., '11-'12; M. A. S. E.. '11-'12; Town 
Preps. '11-'12; Mississippi Sabres, '11-'12. 



'Johnnie" 



28 



■^^^0^Jto&RE&E>OAJE« l©12^g5Ss£^-*" 




THOMAS HENRY CASANOVA, Logtown. Miss. 

Industrial Education. 

Captain Company "M." 

A more promising son has never come from the 
Gulf Coast, where "Tom" has always enjoyed the 
zephyr breeze of that region. He ranks among the 
best in the class as a student, having passed over 
that long ago, but cherished voyage, from Prep to 
Graduation, without having failed on an examina- 
tion. He is an extensive reader and has taken much 
interest in the literary society work, the college 
publications, athletics, and various other student 
activities. In the class football games during his 
Junior year, he attracted much attention as a man of 
ability on the gridiron; in his Senior year, he made 
his "M." We often hear him speak of his ideal lady, 
but above all. he seems to prefer entering the Army 
and living that life that is so applicable to a bache- 
lor. 

Y. M. C. A., '07-'12; Sophomore Debater. '09-T2; 
Dialectic Society, '09-'12: Prosecuting Attorney, '10- 
'11: Critic. ' 1 1 - ' 1 2 : President, '11-T2; Gulf Coast 
Club; Vice-President. '10-'ll. President, '11-'12; 
Class Football, '10-T1; All-Class Football, '10-'ll; 
'Varsity Football; P. P. D. Club, '10-'ll; Junior De- 
bater, 'lO-'ll; Student's Educational Club, '10 "1 1 . 
1912 Club; President Le Club de Francais. '10-'ll; 
Lee Guards, '11-'12 (resigned); Demosthenean Club. 
'11-'12; Sergeant Mississippi Sabre Company. '11-'12; 
Senior Editor Reveille Board, '11-'12. 




"Tom' 



29 



"^ss^ggsss^B^Rev^iLi^ lmg^ssg^m^ 





RALPH ELLIOT CHAPMAN, Courtland, Miss. 

Agriculture. 

Second Lieutenant Company "D." 

"Fessor" is one of the best students in the class. 
He has earned his degree by hard and efficient work, 
and we predict for him a great future in the agri- 
cultural field. His good looks are exceeded only by 
the size of his feet and for this reason, he is a little 
shy of the fair sex. He is very fond of turkey, and 
his candid opinion is that the U. S. Armory should 
be for public use. "Fessor's" favorite pastime is 
dreaming of the good old days when he studied 
Bontany, and immitating the melodious voice of his 
Instructor in that exceedingly interesting subject. 

Agricultural Club, '11-'12; Panola County Club. 
TO-' 12. 



'Chap 11 



30 



■^i^^^^^^R^^BIIvIvB- \®lgu^0^gg&^ 




EARL CHILD. Learned, .Miss. 

Industrial Education. 

First Lieutenant Company "L." 

"A laugh is nothing but a smile, unless it can be 
heard a full half-mile." "Children" hales from 
Learned and always seems to feel it has duty to con- 
vince other people that he is a worthy representa- 
tive of what the name of his native place implies. 
Some attribute the scarcity of his hair to old age, 
but those who know him best say that it's a result 
of his many conflicts with "Cupid." 

"Children" is one of the best all-round men in his 
class, having taken a leading part in almost all the 
college activities. He has the happy faculty of let- 
ting other people do his worrying, and of always 
wearing a smile. He is very energetic and fond of 
pleasure, yet never allowing it to interfere with his 
studies. We believe that his self-confidence and un- 
tiring energy will hasten his rise a prominent place 
among the future great. 

Y. M. C. A.: Philatechnic Literary Society; Dra- 
matic Club: Vice-President. Third Term; Class 
Football Team, '09-'10. 'lO-'ll; Scrub Football Team, 
•()9-'10, 'lO-'ll; 'Varsity, '11-'12; Hinds County Club; 
Night Hawks; Educational Club. "09-'12; Class Vice- 
President. '10-11. 




%c d 




"Earl' 



H 



-^^ggsgs^e* Rbvbiblb* i&iz^^^^^- 





JOE R. CRUMPTON. Starkville, Miss. 

Agriculture. 

Second Lieutenant and Quarter Master Third 

Batallion. 

Joe is an excellent student and has taken lots of 
interest in all his studies. He would make a great 
farmer, and we believe he will be successful in any 
line of agricultural work. However, he desires to 
see the world, and will enter the Naval Academy at 
Annapolis soon. He was a "town prep" until the 
latter part of his Senior year, when he came out to 
live the cadet life with the Major. The early part of 
Joe's military career was not exceptionally good, 
however, his good qualities were at last recognized 
and he is now known as "Lieutenant" by his class- 
mates. His many friends wish him much success in 
life. 

Tennis Club. '11-'12: George Rifles. '11-T2; Presi- 
dent Town Prep Club, '11-'12; Agricultural Club. 
'11-"12; Class Football, '10-'12; Town Prep Baseball, 
'10-'ll; Captain Town Prep Football, '11-'12. 



'Joe" 



32 



!£>!& 




HERNDON CUNNINGHAM. Evergreen, Ala. 

Electrical Engineering. 

Second Lieutenant Company "H." 

"Crooks" hails from our sister state of Alabama, 
and is very desirious of impressing that fact on us. 
He has been with us five long years and no one of 
us has worked harder. His time is very much taken 
up with writing to Columbus, and we are not sure 
whether he will return alone or — . His favorite 
occupation is arguing, and he never tires of it. We 
are sure to hear from him later, and we are equally 
sure of its being to his credit. 

M. A. S. E. ; Cosmopolitan Club; Alabama Club; 
P. P. D. Club; Junior Club; German Club; Lee 
Guards; Mississippi Sabres; Dialectic Literary So- 
ciety; Philomathean Literary Society: Y. M. C. A. 




'Crook" 



33 



E^BIKLE^IOIS 





F. CUNNINGHAM. 

Agriculture. 
Private. 



Starkville, Miss. 



As far as we can learn this prodigy originated 
somewhere in Oktibbeha County. The day he 
arrived on the campus he was dubbed "Blue," and 
has carried that name ever since. As yet, nobody 
testifies that they have witnessed seeing "Blue" in 
the act of deep study, but in the class room he has 
won much distinction. As a typical town prep, he 
carries his indifferent smile, toots his own horn, and 
does not worry about military. "Blue" is a genius 
in the chemical laboratory, and especially delights 
in demonstrating his profound knowledge to his 
patient class in West Point at the Southern Chris- 
tian College. He expects to be a chemist. 



"Blue" 



34 



^^^^Jfri^ Reveille i^i^^§4^^ 




JAMES A. ELLARD. Pittsboro, Miss. 

Industrial Education. 
Private. 

The subject of this sketch entered Prep in '07. As 
as an athlete, Allen early earned a glorious reputa- 
tion and is said by many to be the best tackle in the 
South. He is a good natured. easy going sort of 
fellow, and his room is the trysting-place of all 
home-sick Preps, and "Head" makes a patient host. 
"Head" is loved by everybody in college, but he has 
always been an ardent lover of military(?). Though 
"Head" is not a book-worm, he has a good margin 
to his credit, and his development here is that of a 
rounded man. 

Lee Guard. '11-T2; Class Football, '08-'09; 'Varsity 
Football, '10-'12; Le Club de Francais, '10-'12; P. P. 
D. Club. '10-'ll; Educational Club. '10-'12; Sabre 
Company. '11-'12. 




"Head' 



J5 



^s^giS^^ThB- Re^billb- l^i&^g^a^sr"*" 





'Bert" 



BERTRAM L. FIELD, Natchez, Miss. 

Electrical Engineering. 

Captain Band. 

Bert or "Al. G.." as he is commonly known, needs 
but to be met to be liked. He is a great favorite in 
the class, and when it comes to "Prepping." he has 
no equal. In his sane moments he has found time to 
keep up his studies and to edit this book. He has 
been with us four years, and has been a faithful, 
conscientious student during that time. He has 
shouldered many of the responsibilities of the class 
and has always met them fairly and squarely. He 
has the happy faculty of knowing how to be "every- 
body's friend," and when he once gains a friend he 
keeps him. When he leaves us to take up his course 
in life it will be with the best wishes of all who 
really know him, and it is our unanimous wish that 
he succeed in all that he may undertake. 

Y. M. C. A., '08-'12; Class Historian, '08-'09; Class 
President. 'lO-'ll; College Orhcestra, '08-T2; Princi- 
pal Musician and Manager of Band, '10-'ll; M. A. S. 
E.. Philomathean Literary Society; Mid-Night Crew. 
'10-'ll; German Club. '1(5-' 12 : Junior Club; Octopus 
Club: Dramatic Club, '11-'12; George Rifles, '10-'ll; 
Lieutenant George Rifles, '11-'12; Class Football, '10- 
'12; First Sergeant .Mississippi Sabres; Assistant 
Editor-in-Chief, '11. Reveille; Editor-in-Chief, '12. 
Reveille. 



36 



-^(^^^fe^TK^REv^BiLDB- tsia^jgj^aa^" 




FRANK W. GARDNER. Tupelo. Miss. 

Agriculture. 

Private. 

Because of the action of the faculty, "Frank's" 
journey through college has been beset with many 
strange experiences. However, we are pleased at 
last to see him come to the real issue. He has played 
an imoprtant part in society. "Frank" is generous 
and pleasant at all times, also possessing the ability 
of a good student. He has learned that to be a real 
"Gardener" he must also be a good agriculturist. 

Tennis Club: Basketball; Captain Freshman Base- 
ball Team; Lee Guards; Track Team; Junior Club; 
Cottilion Club; Butinsky Club: German Club: P. P. 
D. Club. 




i- 



. -.• '/._• 



"Frank" 



37 



~*^&0^Jh^RE&muuB- i^i&^^^r^ 





GEORGE T. GILLELAND, Stonewall, Miss. 

Industrial Education. 

Private. 

"Tom" hails from Clark County, just eighteen 
miles south of Meridian, and the same distance from 
a railroad, but to hear him talk you would think he 
was raised behind the buzz of a "HONK" wagon. 
"Tom" has a inclination to sport, and never sees a 
strange Dame, but what he falls deep in love with 
her, and usually makes a "hit" with the fair sex, for 
he is anything but bad looking. 

He has never taken any special interest in the 
military department, but it must be said that he is 
not a bad student, and he likes to boast that he has 
never failed on an exam. "Tom" was never known 
to be angry, and is very-popular with his classmates, 
as shown by the clubs below. 

German Club; Lee Guard; Le Club de Francais; 
Tennis Club; President Clarke County Club. 



'Tom" 



38 



^^^^T>i^ Revkbiulb* i® ls^g^aa^*" 




JACK M. GREAVES, Flora, Miss. 

Industrial Education. 
Captain Company "I." 

"Jack" entered here as a bashful, though diligent, 
Prep in 1907. Proud of the fact, should he be. for 
Dame Fate has never smiled on him. "Jack" is one 
of the few who have not been guilty of failing on a 
subject. Besides having attained a high water mark 
in the section room, Jack has so entwined himself in 
the hearts of his classmates that none could forget 
him. With his 25 pound weight, "Jack" has evi- 
dently detrimined to develop a powerful physique. 
This individual, though seemingly very adept in 
dodging Cupid's darts, has doubtedly been wounded, 
he speaks often and very kindly of a fair damsel at 
our sister college. "Jack" talks of going into the 
military service of Uncle Sam. 

Y. M. C. A.. '07-'12; P. P. D. Club. '11; Madison 
County Club. '07-'12, Vice-President, '11, President, 
'12; Le Club de Francais. '10-'ll; Lee Guards. '11- 
'12; Sergeant Mississippi Sabre Company, '11-'12: 
Military Dozen, '10-"11; 1912 Club. 




"Jack' 



V) 



"^^^^^^Th^ Rb^e-illi^ imz^0s$ l &&^ 





HENRY CLYDE GREY, 



Starkville, Miss. 



Industrial Education. 
Private. 

"Blinker" is a product of our nearby town and, 
though not the most brilliant, can always be relied 
on to bring up a good lesson. He is liked by his 
classmates; and several persons intimated that he 
was affected with a malady of the Solar Plexus, but 
time has wrought many changes. "Blinker" is about 
the youngest man in the class, and his favorite study 
is German. We expect to see Herr Grey win a 
great reputation as a teacher. 



'Blinker' 



40 



^i^^^^Th^ REVEILLE- 1® lS^^sflg^" 




EARL PALMER GULLEDGE. Durant. Miss. 

Agriculture. 

Captain and Ordinance Officer. 

"Duck" is the only original from the Durant 
country. As a student, he stands among the best in 
College, and is liked by both students and Faculty. 
He is exceptionally well versed in the theory of 
Agriculture, and expects to put it in practice after 
finishing. When not busy, he talks to his roomate 
of his future exploits in farming, but never mentions 
matrimony. It has been whispered around that 
"Duck" is in love, but the theory has never been 
proven. The best wishes of the class go with him. 
and may he always succeed in the future as in the 
past. 

Y. M. C. A.; Agricultural Club; President, '11-'12; 
President Holmes County Club, '11-'12; Mississippi 
Sabre Company, '11-'12; Night Hawk; Good Time 
Club. 




"Duck' 



41 



101& 





HARLEY G. HARPER, Jackson, Miss. 

Electrical Engineering. 

Major Second Battalion. 

Major, coming to us in the Sophomore year, is 
one who believes in "doing it now." Becoming in- 
terested in all phases of College life, he has won 
distinction in academic, literary, military, athletics, 
rind love. He s an excellent business man, as can 
be attested by his work as Business Manager of the 
Reveille. Those who know him intimately more 
than appreciate his qualities. 

Restless at times — when his letters do not come 
regularly — -he threatens to leave us and go West, or 
to the Philippines. 

"Prepping" is his past-time, and "get the saber" 
his pass-word. The respect of all his acquaintances 
accompany him in his fight for recognition. 

Business Manager Reveille; Reflector Board; 
Mississippi Sabres. Class Football; President Capi- 
tal City Club; Y. M. C. A.; Philalethian Literary So- 
ciety; M. A. S. E.; President The Military Dozen, 
President Hinds County Club; The Demostheneans. 



'H. G." 



42 



'^^ Thf^REV^ILIvB- ^2^0^20^ 




STEPHEN AVEN HERbERT. Lexington, Miss. 

Civil and Mining Engineering. 

Second Lieutenant Company "I." 

Lexington is responsible for the subject of this 
sketch, and "Pap," for one, is proud of the fact. He 
came to A. & M. just three years ago, but since that 
time he has won many friends both among the stu- 
dents and Starkville society. For this ability as a 
student, we can say that he has completed the 
engineering course in three years; and as a ladies' 
man, we need say nothing. He is happiest(?) when 
acting in the capacity of "Sub-division Inspector." 
After graduation, he will not seek fortune along 
engineering lines, but hopes to make his millions 
while at the head of an Insurance concern. We have 
no fear as to "Pap's" making good, for his ability to 
make friends, together with his business qualities, 
insure a bright future. 

Secretary German Club, '11-'12; Cotillion Club: 
Secretary George Rifles, '10-'ll; M. A. S. E.: Junior 
Club; Dramatic Club. 




'Pap" 



4< 



"'-^s^ggs^i^ Reveille- lma^s^^^ 





GARVIN L. HERRINGTON, Philadelphia. Miss. 

Agriculture. 

Lientenant and Adjutant First Batallion. 

"Lemon." having been with us four years, is one of 
our "standbys." Quiet and unobstructive by nature, 
he must be known to be appreciated. His auburn 
hair always makes a hit with the ladies, yet he cares 
nothing for society. When it comes to work he is 
one man that can be depended upon to do his part. 
His chief ideal is a happy home, and we wish him 
well ever after. 

Agriculture Club, '11-'12; Philotechnic Literary 
Society, '08-'12; 1912 Club. '10-'ll; Good Time Club, 
'10-'ll; Demaotheneans. '11-'12; Mississippi Sabres, 
'11-'12; Class Representative at Commencement. 



"Lemon" 



44 



-^n^^^^lhB-RE^KLivE^ i^i&^s^a^^ 




JOHN S. HESTER. Hazlehurst, Miss. 

Electrical Engineering. 

First Lieutenant Company "A." 

John hails from Hazlehurst. Miss., and has been 
a good worker since we have known him. His chief 
occupation is writing letters, and his favorite amuse- 
ment is "Prepping." He hopes to go to one of the 
big electrical companies, and we feel sure that he 
will be successful. He has made an uphill fight for 
his diploma and we are proud with him, of his sue 
cess. His specialty is military(?). 

M. A. S. E.; Treasurer Engineering Club; 1912 
Club; Philomathean Literary Society. 




"Hon' 



45 



^^^^^T>^b Re^bilivB- img^^^^^ 





ALFONSO HOUSTON, Carthage, Miss. 

Industrial Education. 

Second Lieutenant Company "L." 

"Dad" is his pet name among the younger boys. 
All who know him appreciate his sterling qualities. 
Though not the most brilliant student, he is one of 
those who can be depended on when the exams come 
around. He is noted for his thoroughness, and con- 
scientious applications to his work. He ranks among 
the first in Y. M. C. A. and literary society work, 
having charge of all the Y. M. C. A. meetings. 
"Dad" is not what you might call a ladies' man, but 
there is a little school teacher with whom he loves 
to make candy. His favorite pastime is attending 
military duties. 

Y. M. C. A., '07-12; Chairman Devotional Com- 
mittee. '11-'12; Dialectic Literary Society, '07-T2; 
Censor, '08-'09; Treasurer, '10-T1; Secretary, T0-T1; 
President, '11-'12; President Educational Club. '11- 
'12; 1912 Club; Demosthenean Club. T1-T2; Le Club 
de Francais, ' 10-' 11; Literary Editor Reflector, '11- 
'12; Literary Editor Reveille. 



'Pap' 



+0 



1£>12 




MORLEY JENNINGS. Albion, Mich. 

Industrial Education. 

Captain and Quarter Master. 

"Topsey" was first known to us as a football 
warrior, and he has won quite a reputation as being 
the man with a "toe." Though he joined us in the 
Junior year, "Topsey" was not long in adapting him- 
self. As a student, "Topsey" ranks among the best 
in tK j class, and his standing here has given him an 
opportunity to take special work in Chemistry. 
"Topsey" is very fond of the gentler sex, and it is 
rumored that he is often seen on the walk going to 
town just after supper. 

Y. M. C. A.; George Rifles; German Club; Cotillion 
Club; 'Varsity Football. '10-'12; Basketball, '10-'ll; 
Baseball, '09-'12; Track Team. '10-T2; Junior Club, 
'10-'12; Octopus Club. '11-'12; Seranaders, '10-'12: 
Cosmopolitan Club. '09-T2. 




'Topsy" 



47 



1£>1£ 





ELMER JONES, Independent, Miss. 

Agriculture. 

First Lieutenant Company "M." 

"Elmer" has been very attentive to duties during 
his four years of college life. We would be tempted 
to call him a "book worm," but we believe that he 
will return to Tate County and put his store of 
knowledge into practice. His only struggle has been 
with the English department, but since, he has been 
faithful over a few things he has succeeded in 
mastering many. 

Vice-President Tate County Club, '11-'12; Good 
Times Club; Y. M. C. A. 



"Elr 



1012 




JOSEPH BYROX JOXES. Barlow. Miss. 

agriculture. 

Second Lieutenant Company "K." 

"Squire" is a specialized ladies' man. It is inter- 
esting to hear him tell about "Squire's" love affairs. 
He started out preparing himself for the life of a 
"pedagog." but seeing the necessity of more scientific 
agriculturalists, he came over the line during his 
Sophomore year. He has a jolly word for everyone. 
1U- lias rendered much assistence in class athletics. 
especially in football. "Squire" could have done the 
football stunts on the 'varsity team, but he con- 
siders merit as a student more desirable than ath- 
letics. He always likes to visit the I. I. & C. 

Agricultural Club; Normal Club: P. P. D. Club. 
Philotechnic Literary Society, '08-'09; Scrub Basket- 
ball. '08-'O9: Scrub Football, '09-'10: All-Class Foot- 
ball, '10-'ll; Class Football. '08-'12. Manager, '11-'12, 
Manager Class Baseball, 'lO-'ll. 




"Jeb" 



4'» 



-^^^^^ThE-RE^EMDL^ lQlS^g^gg^"^ 





"Wallace' 



WALLACE C. JOURNEY, Jacksonville, Ala. 

Mining Engineering. 

Captain Comapny "F." 

This illustrious young man was reared among the 
mountains of the Vulcan State. Since his arrival at 
the Institution, he has taken an active part in all 
college activities, especially the Y. M. C. A., has won 
a host of friends, not only among the students and 
faculty, but among the people of this community. In 
him we find portrayed those sterling qualities of 
character that tend to develop true manhood. Sick- 
ness has interfered somewhat with his academic 
work, but has not influenced his kind, sunny disposi- 
tion. During the last year of his college career, he 
has had the honor of being Business Manager of our 
monthly publication, "The College Reflector," and 
under his management it has met with the greatest 
of success. "Duck" takes quite a fancy to the "fair 
ones." and his one true pleasure of each day is to 
call "143." He is quite entertaining, especially so on 
Saturday evenings when he sings for the "Preps" at 
the picture show. His sole ambition in life is, that 
some day he may Live by being Killed'. 

Y. M. C. A.. '08-'12; Vice-President, '10-'ll; Chair- 
man Bible Study, '11-'12; Chairman Social Com- 
mittee, T0-T1; Philotechnic Literary Society, '09-'12; 
Censor, Second Term, '09-'10; Recording Secretary, 
'10-'ll; George Rifles, (Resigned); Alabama Club, 
'08-'09; Cosmopolitan Club. '09-'12; President. '11- 
'12; Junior Club. '10-'ll; Lee Guards, '08-'ll, 
Sergeant, '10-Tl; Dramatic Club. , T0-'12; Comedy 
and Glee Club, '09-'10; Military Dozen. '10-Tl; Nor- 
mal Club, T1-T2; M. A. S. E.. '10-'12; Treasurer, 
Second Term. '10-'ll; Sabre Company, '11-T2; As- 
sistant Business Manager Reflector, '10-Tl; Bus- 
iness Manager, T1-T2. 
50 



1012 




WILLIAM M. KEETON, Meridian. Miss. 

Agriculture. 

Second Lieutenant Company "M." 

"Baldy" has won military honors which are second 
to none. He is commander-in-chief of the "Citz 
Clothes" Specials. His commands on the parade 
ground are clear-cut and distinct. It is true that he 
has met with ups and downs in his line of duty, but 
the top of his head shows proof that his efforts to 
succeed have been great. He has severed all friend- 
ship with the fair sex, but it is unfair to do this be- 
cause of his grievance against only "one." "Baldy" 
has elected special work in chemistry and he will 
return to Meridian and show who is who, in 
pharmacy. Ask him to sing you a solo. 

Queen City Club. '08-'10; President Lauderdale 
County Club. ' 1 1-' 12 : Mississippi Sabre Company, 
'11-'12; Y. M. C. A.. '11-'12. 




"Baldy" 



51 



1£>1& 





HARVEY J. KLUMB, Rhinelander, Wis. 

Electrical Engineering. 

Second Lieutenant. 

"Fuzzy." although a native of Wisconsin, loves the 
State or Mississippi. He came to us in the middle of 
the session. '08-'09, and has been a loyal member of 
Class '12 ever since. "Fuzzy" has the honor of being 
one of the most intellectual men in college. He is 
not inclined to be a "ladies' man," although he ad- 
mires the "fair sex" considerably. Society is his last 
thought. Electricity being his first, and well may it 
be, for some day his gifts and learning will be pre- 
sented to the Electrical world. Harvey is admired 
by his classmates for his open heart and good na- 
ture. He counts his friends few. although he has 
many, and he is true to those on his list in every 
respect. His hobby is machinery and especially that 
which has reluctance, resistence. and impedence con- 
nected with it. His friends join in wishing him suc- 
cess and happiness through life. 

Seven Sinners. '09-'10; President, '10-'ll. '11-'12; 
Engineering Club, 'lO-'ll. 11-'12: Harrison County 
Club, '10-'ll. 



'Fuzzy' 



52 



^^^s^ Tfrie- Reveille- IS) is. 




JAMES MATTHEW LANGSTON. Kola. Miss. 

Agriculture. 

Captain Company "E." 

It is a pleasure to point to "Jim" as being among 
those who never fall below the requirements of a 
brilliant student, and among the few who have never 
been found deficient on an examination. He has 
chosen dairy husbandry for special study, and his re- 
search in that subject has been extensive and inten- 
sive. Xo one has done more to encourage religious 
work among students, and the life he has lived while 
with us shows the value of such work. "Jim" came 
from the sandy land of south Mississippi where pine 
forests are a prevailing part of the flora. He is as 
precise in his habits as a chemist is in his work, 
though it is some time in the future before he should 
be called a bachelor, if ever. He will perhaps teach 
a few years in agricultural high schools. His work, 
as a whole, is praised by students and teachers. 

Class Historian. '10-'ll; 1912 Club; First Sergeants 
Club. Secretary. 'l()-'ll; Philotechnic Literary So- 
ciety, Corresponding Secretary. Second Term. Re- 
cording Secretary, Third Term. '10-'ll; President, 
Second Term. '11-'12; Mission Study Commit tee. 'ID 
'11: Chairman. '11-'12; Agricultural Club. Treasurer 
Third Term, 'lO-'lT; Director, Second Term, '11-'12 
Y. Al. C. A. Cabinet. '11-'12; Reflector Hoard 
Reveille Board: Sabre Company: President Coving- 
ton Countv Club. 




"Jim' 



s.-s 



""^Se^tes^ 1 ^ RBVE>ILLI^ ^l&^Ssg&P^ 





JOHN V. LOBDELL. Rosedale, Miss. 

Electrical Engineering. 
Second Lieutenant Band. 

John has come up the long, hard road from "Prep," 
and no one has worked harder to gain his end than 
he. His work in the Band is one of his greatest 
pleasures, and now he plays most anything from 
"hands" with the girls, to "dozens" with his class- 
mates. He does not mind being teased in the least 
(?) and is never absent minded(?). We wish him 
success with his chosen work, and his memory will 
linger long with us. 

Art Editor Reveille; Swamp Rabbits, '10-'ll; Y. M. 
C. A.; Orchestra, '09-'12; M. A. S. E. 



'Doggone' 



54 



-^^^^Ihe-REV^BELIyB- 1^18 




DAVID MARGOLIS. Starkville, Miss. 

Civil and Alining Engineering. 

Private. 

"Jake" originated in Starkville, Miss., and the be- 
ginning of his sojourn is not even remembered by 
himself. His good natured ways causes him to be 
liked by all. "Jake" does not believe in worrying 
over his text books; especially mathematics. In the 
Class games, "Jake" won a great reputation. He ex- 
pects to sell postcards of St. Louis when he finishes. 

Town Prep. '08-'09; Town Preps Football and 
Baseball Teams. '08-'09; Philotechnic Literary So- 
ciety, '09-'10; Peewee Football and Baseball Teams, 
'08-'10; Vice-President of Okitibbeka County Club. 
'10-'ll; Cosmopolitan Club, '11-'12; Class Football 
and Baseball Teams, '09-'12. 




'Jake" 



55 



"^^^^fe^th& Re^belivE^ imz^^^^^^ 





LOUIS A. MARTIN. Williamsville, Miss.. 

Agriculture. 

Private Company "B." 

"Sleepy." as his name indicates, is very fond of 
that blissful rest. He was an Engineer until the be- 
ginning of his Junior year, when he realized that at 
the present time Agriculture presented a greater 
onportunity for advancement. He takes great 
pleasure in telling of his society stunts, but his 
hearers sometime wonder if the half has yet been 
told. He is fond of a joke, and takes special delight 
in springing a good one on "Doc." "Sleepy" has 
made many friends by his social disposition, and 
they will watch with interest his future steps in life. 

J. Z. George Rifles, '10-'12; German Club, '10-'12; 
Junior Club, '10-'ll; Cotillion Club, '10-'12: Agri- 
cultural Club. '10-'12; Y. M. C. A.. , 08- , 12; Class 
Football, '11-'12; Dialectic Literary Society, '09-'10; 
President Grenada County Club. '11 -'12. 



'Sleepy" 



56 



-^^^^ Thi^ Rb^bilivB- l^is^^^^r^ 




JAMES P. McNEIL, Xettleton. Miss. 

Industrial Education. 

Private Band. 

"J- P-." or "Jimmie," drifted into this College in 
time to meet us in the Sophomore year. Since that 
historical year, his genial nature and smiling counte- 
nance has won for him a soft place in the hearts of 
all who know him. "Jim" is no mean student, and 
not only is he a musician of the first degree, but his 
dramatic talent is not easily surpassed. "J. P." is 
said to have been complicated in an "Affaire 
d'amour" in our near city, but Jim is no fatalist and 
loves to dream in the smoke of his pipe. With that, 
you constant and unchangeable friend, may you 
ever meet the gifts of the future with a smile. 

Lee Guards, '09-'12; First Lieutenant. '12; Octo- 
pus Club, Chef, '11-'12; Monroe County Club, '10-'12. 
President. '12; Y. M. C. A.. "09-'12; Sabre Company, 
'12; Dramatic Club, '10-'12: Orchestra. '09-'12; Le 
Club de Francais, '10-'12: Junior Club, '1()-'12; Ger- 
man Club. '11-'12: Mid-night Crew. '10-'12; Presi- 
dent. '12; Class Football. 11-'12. 




"J. P. 



57 



1£>1& 





MALCOLM M. McKINNON, Coldwater, Miss. 

Agriculture. 

First Lieutenant Company "H." 

"Mack" is the original type of the Tate County 
soils. He is an excellent student, preferring a studi- 
ous life, rather than putting much time on the ath- 
letic field. Everybody soon learns to like him, 
especially if they hear him discourse on his esca- 
pades with "Cupid," and of the one instance that he 
knew he was in love. He and "Hamp" are shadows, 
even when it comes to keeping out inspectors. 
"Mack" will go to his ideal farm as soon as he gets 
his diploma. 

Y. M. C. A.; Secretary Tate County Club, '10-'ll; 
President, '11-'12; Good Time Club. '10 '11. 



"Mac' 



58 



1£>12 




WYATT MIMS. 



Starkville, Miss. 



Agriculture. 
Private Company "B." 

"Pewee" has always been the runt. His sharp, 
piercing voice can be heard farther than he is apt 
to be seen. He is always a favorite with the ladies, 
but we believe that he is still looking for the lady 
who will prove to be "his" favorite. "Pewee" has 
never been interested in our military department. 
His special study has been dairy husbandry, in which 
department he has done much practical work. We 
believe that he is prepared to go out and develop 
Prof. Moore's "principle characteristics of the dairy 
cow." 

Agricultural Club; Y. M. C. A.; Oktibbeha Coun- 
ty Club; Good Time Club. '10-'ll. 




"Runt' 



v, 



1£>1& 





WILL COX MIMS. Starkville. Miss. 

Agriculture. 

Second Lieutenant Company "B." 

Our best wishes go with those who work to defray 
expenses for a college training, who strive unceas- 
ingly and meet success. Such a lad is "Will." He 
does not point out failed, but looks after his own 
duties. He is a pleasant associate and has a jolly 
word for you at all times. We hope he will improve 
the agricultural conditions of Oktibbeha County, as 
we think that there is room for much to be done. 
"Will" is fond of spending the summer vacation at 
the college, especially during the teachers' normal. 
He met some one and "they lived happily ever after- 
wards.' ' 

Oktibbeha County Club; Y. M. C. A.; Class Base- 
ball; Class Football. '09-'10; Good Time Club, TO-'ll. 



"Willy" 



60 



^^^^^^^B-RE^BILLB- l^lg. 




CHARLIE S. MOODY, West Point, Miss. 

Textile. 
Private. 

"Preacher" has been with us the regular time, but 
owing to his quiet and industrial habits, he is not as 
well known to us as he should be. Nevertheless, 
those who know him intimately appreciate his 
qualities and declare him to be one of our best men. 
He has not played "Society" while here, but in the 
Textile Mill he can play anything from "Steamboat 
Bill" to "II Trovatore" upon the spindles and spools. 
We wish him unbounded success in his chosen pro- 
fession. 

Dialectic Literary Society. '10-'ll; President '11- 
'12; Textile Club, 10-'12; Clay County Club. 'l('l-'12. 



«., 



BV^IIvIyE^l€>l& 





Tat" 



JAMES ARTHUR PATRICK. Johns. Miss. 

Industrial Education. 

Captain Company "C." 

"Pat." as he is familiarly called, came to us in our 
Junior year from the class of '11, and has since 
proven one of our best students. He has made good 
in every line of work that he has undertaken. For 
his literary ability, he was chosen Editor-in-chief of 
the Reflector; his work in the Y. M. C .A. has also 
been of the highest character; his speaking ability 
has won him a great many medals and he will repre- 
sent us at the oratorical contest; in class football he 
has won a reputation. Notwithstanding these facts, 
his best work is done in the class-room. We predict 
for him a bright future in his chosen profession of 
teaching, because his good nature and sturdy appli- 
cation are sure to win him a place. 

Y. M. C. A.; Bible Study Committee, '08-'09; Fi- 
nancial Committee, '10-'ll; Chairman and Treasurer. 
'11-' 12 ; Philotechnic Literary Society, Censor, '08- 
'09; Parlimentarian, '10-'ll; President. '11-'12; Vice- 
President Class. '08-'09, '11; Class Orator. '10-'ll: 
Class Football. '08-'09, '11-'12; Rankin County Club. 
Vice-President, '10-'ll: President, '11-'12; 1912 Club; 
Le Club de Francais; President Demostheneans, '11- 
'12; Editor-in-Chief of Reflector: Chautauquan 
Representative; Freshman Medal, '07-'08; Sopho- 
more Medal. '08-'09; Alumni Medal, '10-'ll: Missis- 
sippi Sabre Company; M. I. O. A. Representative, 
'11-'12. 



62 



i£)12 




ELLIS WINSTON POPE. Tylertown, Miss. 

Industrial Education. 
Captain Company "B." 

The subject of this sketch comes from the good 
County of Pike. He is generous, modest and at 
times was known to be very studious. "Ellis" has 
been handicapped by sickness, which caused him to 
lose his diploma. Some are aware of the fact, that 
he is quite an Epicurean. Some venture that he is 
in love, but those who were here during the Normal 
claim that his most ardent desire is to possess cer- 
tain "Land." We sincerely hope that he will come 
back to claim his diploma next year — if possible the 
"Land." 

Y. M. C. A.: Philotechnic Literary Society; Le 
Club de Francais: 1912 Club; Good Time Club; First 
Sergeants Club; Student's Educational Club; Missis- 
sippi Sabre Company; Pike County Club; Normal 
Club; Ex-Business Manager Reveille, 12: Assistant 
Business Reveille, '11. 



63 



"^^^^^ahEARE^DIIyL^ lmg^^^^^^ 





FRANK RAY PRICE, Carpenter, Miss. 

Electrical Engineering. 

Lieutenant and Adjutant Second Battalion. 

A product of Copiah County, the exact spot being 
an uncertain quantity. "Pewee," with his three feet 
two and one-half inches, manfully asserts that this 
spot is known as Carpenter, and so we must sup- 
pose for the present that this is correct. The 
"Whimper" is noted among his friends for his little 
ness and also for a very sleepy head — which we fear 
gets much abuse in the way of thinking. The "Little 
Old Boy" is ambitious of becoming an Electrical 
Engineer, in which he has our very best wishes for 
success. 

George Rifles; Junior Club: Copiah County Club; 
V. M. C. A. 



'Pe Wee" 



64 



-^^^^T^ReY-BILLE- l©12^^^^r^ 




C. C. RAXDALL, 



Bewelcome. Miss. 



Agriculture. 
Private Company "A." 

"Ram" is the class agronomist, but has taken great 
interest in all phases of agricultural study. To pass 
away the time, he talks with "Stank of their matri- 
monial prospects. He can relate many instances of 
brilliant deeds in war. and can tell you how he 
crossed the deep water while fleeting from the 
enemy at McComb City. All classes of live stock 
interest him. but especially the goats and chickens 
near the Campus. "Ram" expects to return to the 
"Old Farm." and we are sure that he i> well qualified 
to manage it in a scientific way. 

Philotecnic Literary Society. '08-'10; Class Foot- 
ball, '09-'12; Agricultural Club, '09-'ll; Good Timer's 
Club, '10-'ll; Amite County Club. '08-'12; Sabre 
Company, '11-'12: V. M. C. A., '08-'12; Normal Club. 
'10-'ll. 




" Harnesses" 



.,S 



'^^^^^Ih^RE^BILI/B- lmZ^F^^r^ 





'Stank" 



STANLEY W. RHODES, Roxie, Miss. 

Agriculture. 

Second Lieutenant and Quarter Master Second 

Battalion. 

"Stank" has had much experience in every phase 
of college activities. Believing that "He who 
tooteth not his own horn the same shall not be 
tooted," he joined the bugle corps during the early- 
part of his career. For three years he has been a 
star player on the 'varsity football team, and many 
victories in track events have been won by him. No 
one is more popular among his classmates and the 
other students. In addition to this, he is a brilliant 
student of agriculture. He tells of his ideal live 
stock farm in Franklin County which is now await- 
ing him, and we expect him to sacrifice it and go 
into partnership with Jno. J. Hood, Manager of the 
Laundry. Ask him about Whitworth College, about 
his letter marked "due 2c" which was worth more 
than all of Shakespeare's works, and his future trip 
to the Panama Exposition. 

Agricultural Club; German Club; Cotillion Club; 
Franklin County Club; Junior Club; Dialectic Liter- 
ary Society. '09-'10; Sabre Company; George 
Rifles, '08-'09; Sergeant. '10-'ll, Lieutenant, '11-'12; 
Manager Basketball Team, '10; Track Team, 'lO-'ll; 
Captain, '11-'12; 'Varsity Football, '09-'10-'ll, 
Manager, '11; Y. M. C. A., '08-'09; Band, '08-'09-'10; 
Class Baseball; Wall Stret Club; Mid-night Crew. 



66 



^^^^^Tfa^REV^ILLB- lOlg. 




CARL ELBERT ROBERTS. Prairie. Miss. 

Civil and Mining Engineering. 
First Lieutenant Company "E." 

Carl, or "Billy." as he is better known to us, 
joined the class as a Junior, having been forced to 
droo out of the Class of '11 on account of sickness. 
However, despite this late start, no one of us has 
more friends. This is due to his jolly good nature 
and never-tiring sense of humor. No crowd can 
long stay dull if "Billy" is among the number. But 
few realize what is concealed beneath this happy, 
care-free exterior, so seldom is it removed. Still 
"Billy" has his serious moods as well as the rest of 
us., and it is then that we get a glimpse of the true 
man. Love affairs? Guess we'd better not touch 
upon this topic — too broad. 'Twould require space 
unlimited. 

Lee Guard, '07-'12; First Sergeant, '10-'ll: German 
Club, , 09-'12; Cottillion Club, '08-'ll; Junior Club, 
'09-'ll: Monroe County Club, '07-'12: Philotechnic 
Literary Society, '07-'09; Y. M. C. A., '07-' 1 1 ; Scrub 
Baseball. '07-'ll; Class Football. '07-'09; Manager, 
'08-'09; M. A. S. F.. '09-'ll; Mississippi Sabres, 
'11-'12. 




"Billy' 



67 



^iS^^^^K^ REWBILI/B- i^l^^^^^^ 





CARL W. ROTHE. Agricultural College. Miss. 
Captain Company "A." 
Mechanical Engineering. 

Carl is a native of "Deutchland" and. we must say, 
possesses many of the characteristics of the people 
of that land. These characteristics assert themselves 
in such ways as a strong will power, love of indus- 
try, and an independent nature. He has recently 
shown very strong symptons of being in love. At 
any rate, we predict for "Dutchy" a success that 
many of us can well envy. 

His specialties are, hot radiators, a real mellow 
pipe, and fishing in Kosciusko. 

Class Secretary, '09-'10; Reflector Board; Reveille 
Board: Class Football, '08-'09, '09-'10; Dialectic 
Literary Society; Engineering Club; Cosmopolitan 
Club; Sabre Company. 



'Dutchy" 



68 



-^u^^^^^ThB-RE^BiivLE- l^i&^^ggr^ 




JOSEPH R. ROUTTEN, Norfolk. Va. 

Industrial Education. 

Captain Company "D." 

Joe, or "Lucy." came to us in the Sophomore year 
and, with out-stretched arms, we welcomed our smil- 
ing "Co-ed." By his musical talent and winning 
manners, Joe has practically taken the hearts of the 
fair sex in our local community. Not only in the 
class room has Joe been successful. By his pro- 
ficiency and love oi Military Science and Tactic, he 
was rewarded with a captaincy. Though rather 
severe in his military policies at times. "Lucy" has 
made a model Captain and that is something said. 
We know not your field, our Comrade, but here's to 
your health from the Class of '12. 

Cosmopolitan Club, '09-' 1 1 : Secretary, '11-'12: Le 
Club de Francais, '10-'ll; Sabre Company, '11-'12; 
V. M. C. A. Cabinet, '11-'12. 




"Lucy' 



..., 



^^g^^The* Rbvbillb- i©i&^^^^^^ 





CHARLES W. SHAIFER, Hermanville, Miss. 

Electrical Engineering. 

Private. 

Charlie has always been a hard worker and an 
honest student. His favorite game is "crack-a-lou," 
and his specialty is solid geometry(?). His future 
occupation is yet unchosen. but whatever it may be. 
if an honest effort will help, we are sure that he will 
make good. He is a great admirer of the fa'r sex(?) 
and at times we fear for his safety, but he usually 
shows up on time. When he graduates we lose him. 
but not his memory. 

Georg; Rifles, '11-'12; M. A. S. E. 



'Charlie" 



70 



E^ REVEILLE* 1£> 12 



<.'.•!/' 




MERVYN D. SMITH. Kosciusko, Miss. 

Civil and Mining Engineering. 

Captain and Adjutant. 

Mervyn. better known as "Doc," hails from 
Kosciusko. He joined the Class of 12 as a Fresh- 
man. "Doc" has taken an active interest in all 
phases of College life, and although is not an ath- 
lete himself, he has done much towards getting out 
winning teams this year. He stands high in both the 
Military and Academic Departments. "Doc" has 
many friends among the boys; to know him i- i<< 
like him. He is also a favorite o: the fair sex, but 
he never lets his love for them take up too much of 
his time. He promises to be a Civil Engineer of 
prominence, and we all wish him success. 

President German Club. '11 -'12: President Engi- 
neering Club. '11-'12: Captain George Rifles. '11-'12: 
Mississippi Sabres. 




"Doc' 



71 



-^^^^^e^Re^biule- lmz^gFsg^^ 





PETER EDWARD SPINKS, Daleville. Miss. 

Industrial Education. 

Second Lieutenant Company "G." 

This good-natured and intelligent fellow origi- 
nated somewhere down in Kemper County, and she 
could not boast of a more worthy son. "Peter" en- 
joys studying, but he delights more in telling stories 
of his experience as a school teacher, and of the 
model stock farm that he is going to operate when 
he leaves school. "Pete" is a great admirer of the 
ladies — at a distance, and speaks often of the ideal 
woman on an ideal plantation. He is taking elective 
work in Agriculture and expects to take charge of 
an Agricultural High School. 

Philomathean Literary Society; Educational Club; 
Y. M. C. A.; Bible Study Committee; President 
Kemper County Club; Le Club de Francais. 



'Peter" 



72 



^^^^^^T>i^Re^e>i1vI,b- im*^^^^ 




HARRY C. STANFORD, Lexington, Miss. 

Agriculture. 

First Lieutenant Company "F." 

"Sandy" joined us at the beginning of our Fresh- 
man year and has done four years of excellent work. 
He has made many friends by his social disposition, 
and his room is a popular hanging out place. His 
specialty is agronomy, however, he has done good 
work with poultry and can tell you the location of 
any chicken yard near the Campus. He expects to 
return to his home in June and put into practice 
what he has learned in the lecture room and on the 
farm. He will carry with him the best wishes of his 
many friends. 

Agricultural Club, '10-'12; Cotillion Club, '10-'ll; 
1912 Club. '10-'ll: Vice-President Holmes County 
Club, Tl-'12; Secretary and Treasurer. Good Times 
Club. 'lO-'ll. 




"Sandv' 



73 



^^g^^l>ic -Itev^nx^iQig. 





JESSE NEVILLE STEVENSON, Bartow. Fla. 

Electrical Engineering. 

Second Lieutenant Company "A." 

Jesse, better known as "La La Bingo," comes to 
us from Florida, and has been with us for five years. 
He is noted among his friends, which are many, for 
his originality and good nature, which some day will 
gain for him a throne, provided his many nicknames 
do not prove fatal and weigh him down, for "La La 
Bingo" L only one of the many which he bears. He 
is desirous of becoming an Electrical Engineer and 
is determined to do so, but the studying side of the 
question he does not like. We all hope his de- 
terminations will see him safely through the battles 
of life. Neville is very popular with the girls. His 
motto is, "Love all the girls, if you can't love them 
all. love as many as you can." Sheet's greatest fault 
is. exaggeration. 

German Club; Cotillion Club; Junior Club; M. A. 
S. E. Secretary, First Term. '11-'12; Wall Street 
Club; Second Lieutenant; Mid-night Crew; Cosmo- 
politan Club; Tennessee Club; Class Baseball and 
Football; Scrub Football. 'lO-'ll. 



"La La" 



74 



^^^^^JfriB* Reveille- lmz^^^^^^ 




JULIAN C. STOY, Augusta, Ga. 

Mechanical Engineering. 

First Lieutenant Band. 

Julian will flit through his college career in three- 
years, but the shortness of his stay does not detract 
one whit from his personality. He is a social 
favorite, but when it comes to actual facts we are 
sure that someone back in the Cracker State holds 
the Ace of hearts. He is a firm believer in the adage 
of "toot your own horn, or the same shall not be 
tooted. When it comes to blowing a trombone and 
curling his hair, he has few equals and no superiors. 
He has a vacant, far away look in his eyes at times, 
which seems to indicate matrimony, and in this and 
all other of his undertakings we wish him well. 

Y. M. C. A.; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, '11-'12; Dra- 
matic Club, '10-'12; President, First and Second 
Terms. '11-'12; Reflector Board. '11-'12; Editor Y. M. 
C. A. Handbook. ' 1 1 -' 12 ; Philomathean Literarv So- 
ciety: M. A. S. E.; Class Phool. '10-11: Cosmopoli- 
tan Club, '09-'12: Secretary and Treasurer, '10-'12. 
Mid-night Crew', '10-'12: Dance Orchestra. '09-'12; 
German Club, "09-'12 (resigned); German Club, '11- 
'12; Junior Club, '10-'ll; President (resigned): Lee 
Guards, '10-'ll (resigned): George Rifles, '11-'12; 
Sabre Company; Class Football, '10-'12; Class Base- 
ball. '09-'12; Reveille Board. 




"Jew' 



75 



^^^gg^ThE-RE^EILLB* lmZ^gFSsggp^ 





RIVES CLIFTON STILES. Starkville. Miss. 

Agriculture. 

Private Company "K." 

"Rab" won honors on the gridiron as his preferred 
name indicates. But he is also very limber on the 
diamond. He is a fair sample of the "town preps." 
He is a byped without feathers. When he laughs 
you will too. and he is easily tickled, although he is 
perfectly harmless. He has many cold walks out 
here every morning, but "Pap" warms him up at 
political economy during the first hour. Before 
entering college he attended the public school in 
Starkville. and consequently he is very popular with 
the ladies who were in school with him. 

Captain Town Prep Baseball Team, '10-'ll; Town 
Prep Football, '10-'11-'12; Town Pren Club. 



'Rabbit' 



7b 



"^^^^^^ s T>ib^Rev^bille^ i^i^^g^^*^ 




ASHLEY ELIHU TERRY, New Hebron, Miss. 

Agriculture. 

First Lieutenant Company "D." 

In our class there are some that have made better 
grades than Ashley, but few that are as well quali- 
fied to put into practice the many things that they 
have learned. He has spent much of his four years 
at work on the College farm, however, he has also 
found time for other things. He represented his 
society in the Annual Sophomore Debate, has shown 
interest in the Y. M. C. A., and has played Class 
football two years. 

Y. M. C. A.. '08-'12; Dialectic Literary Society. '08 
'12; Freshman Medal. '09; Lawrence County "Club, 
'08-'12; Class Football. '10-'12. 




'A. E. 



77 



^^^^^ fe$ lh^RE^BIL/IvB- lOlS. 



MB -, §* ™ 




pji 


^^ 


IB Mat -4 ' 








I A j-J 




H 


* y'SJB 





EBB THOMAE, Fayette. Miss. 

Agriculture. 

Captain Company "G." 

Ebb is one of the few who has spent five years at 
the college and he feels like a veteran among us. 
He is a bright student in agriculture, and has elected 
special work in chemistry. Being one of Peter 
Parley's Disciples, he has never gotten over his 
"preppish" ways. He likes to dance with the Stark- 
ville girls, but never forgets his "blue bird" at the 
I. I. & C. He expects to spend the rest of his col- 
lege training in the study of medicine, and we pre- 
dict for him a successful future as a "pill roller." 

Y. M. C. A., '07-'12; Agricultural Club, '09-'12; 
Junior Club, 'lO-'ll; Normal Club, '10-'ll; President 
Jefferson County Club; First Sergeants Club. '10-'ll; 
George Rifles; 1912 Club: Saber Company; P. P. D. 
Club. '10-'ll. 



"Beans" 



78 



^si^g^ TH^r Rev-e-illb- 1© lg^Sssag^ 




FRANK DEWITT THOMAS, Verona. Miss. 

Civil and Mining Engineering. 

Lieutenant Colonel Commanding Regiment. 

The subject o; this sketch is not halt* as tierce as 
he looks. The wise, public sentiment of Verona was 
demonstrated four years ago when it dumped the 
"Colonel" at A. and M. lie started on time, but on 
account of the slow trains that run from that great 
city, was delayed one year. In him we find an ideal 
student, a better comanding officer, and a man of 
great possibilities. Being capable and careful, he 
possesses the rare qualities of a dignified Lieutenant 
Colonel, an office in which he has exercised his 
authority and influence to the best of his ability, lie 
has a striking appearance, popular, is a friend to all 
who come in contact with him and will some day 
be adorned with greatness. There is only one girl 
in the world for him, and she it is who lives at 
Booneville and imposes upon his finances for 
"postage due." During his entire career at A. and 
M., he was never known to "cut" a recitation or 
have his name appear on the dcliquent list. On 
Commencement day the Faculty, as well as the stu- 
dent body, will lii-c cine if its ablest and most ef- 
ficient College men. while at the same time the U. 
S. A. will have the privilege of sharing his future 
pi issibilities. 

Dramatic Club, '10-'12; Junior Club. TO-'ll; George 
Rifles (Resigned); M. A. S. E.. '10-'ll; V. M. C. A., 
'08-'12; Corresponding Secretary, *1L'12; Class 
Treasurer, '11-'12: Normal Club, '11-'12: First Cap- 
tain Sabre Company, '11-M2; Chairman Honor Com- 
mittee, '11-'12; Class Representative at Commence- 
ment. 

79 




"Frank' 



^<^^^^H^ Rev-bill^ i&iz^^^^- 





EARL TUCKER THOMPSON, Harperville. Miss. 

Agriculture. 

Private Company "B." 

This lad entered the class three years ago. Think- 
ing his work too heavy, he at one time thought or 
dropping back with the next class, but he has suc- 
ceeded in coming on with us. Thompson is very 
skillful in imitating professors. He has never been 
in the lecture room with one whom he could not imi- 
tate to perfection. He has always supported ath- 
letics. He is a very pleasant associate, and every- 
one wishes him success. 

Vice-President Scott County Club, 11-T2; Y. M. 
C. A.: Agricultural Club; Good Times Club; Hungry 
Dozen; Philomathian Literary Society. 



"Stank" 



IQ1Z 




TINSLEY B. THROWER, Mayhew. Miss. 

Electrical Engineering. 

Second Lieutenant Company "A." 

"T. Bone" hails from the nearby metropolis of 
Mayhew and his frequent visits there, and to Colum- 
bus, have caused us a great deal of anxiety. His 
chief occupation is combing his hair like a certain 
Ex-Governor of this state. He expects to graduate 
in June, if he "has time." With all, he is a "hail-fel- 
low-well-met," and the memory of his quaint, humor- 
ous expressions will linger long with us. 




"T Bone" 



^^^^^ThB-RE^^IIvIv^ l^ifi^^a^^ 





OTIS R. TISDALE, Laurel, Miss. 

Civil and Mining Engineering. 

Private Company "C." 

"Nubby," always wearing a bright and congenial 
smile, is small of statue, but he has a big heart. It 
has been said, and truthfully, that 'no one could 
possible get angry with "i\ubby.'" He has always 
taken an active part in college affairs, and particu- 
larly true to class activities. "Nubby" is a great ad- 
mirer of the "Lady Beautiful" — as is evidenced by 
his letters — and is one of the "Star" girls of our 
Dramatic Club. We hope to see a little cottage in 
Laurel brightened by his noble character. 

Librarian Engineering Club, '10-'l 1 ; Vice-President, 
'11-'12; Vice-President, Secretary, and Treasurer. 
Dramatic Club, '11-'12; George Rifles. 



'Nubby" 



82 



1£>12 




CHARLES WESLEY TREEN, Purvis. Miss. 

Agriculture. 

Captain J. C. Hardy Volunteers. 

"Dock" is quite an important Guy when ladies visit 
the campus while he is "O. D." The young ladies 
of Starkville think there is no one like him (perhaps 
this is true). As Captain of the Hardy Volunteers, 
he has done many military stunts. He went to reci- 
tations on time — once. "Dock" is a good student, 
and few among us possess a greater literary ability. 
To all who desire information in regard to Dupont's 
dynamite, college seal pins, Wayne Wardrobes, etc., 
we refer you to him. 

Y. M. C. A., '0S-'12; Montreat Conference. '10-'ll; 
Agricultural Club. '10-'12; Lamar County Club, '10- 
'12; President; Tennis Club. '10-'ll: Junior Baseball, 
Class Football, '11-'12; Secretary Demosthenean 
Club. '11-'12: Dialectic Literary Society, '08-'12; 
Vice-President, '11-'12; Critic; Junior Debate. '10-'ll; 
Reflector Staff, '11-'12; Magruder .Medal. '09-'10; 
Prize Essay (Du Pont). 





M~S 


II ii 1 








m 




i 


P 


1 



"Doctor" 



S^ 



^^^^^^Th^RE^EMui.^ img^0 S $g 2 @^ 





HUGH REID VARNADO, 



Osyka. Miss. 



Mechanical Engineering. 
Major First Battalion. 



"Hughy" is one of those fellows who is a friend to 
everybody, and he is no doubt one of the most popu- 
lar men in school. As his record indicates, his 
activities were not confined only to academic work. 
Although a loyal A. & M. supporter, he thinks a 
good deal of "University Men." a fact which caused 
him some worry and heart trouble, but in the end 
he came out with flying colors. He intends to be a 
consulting engineer, and we all wish him success. 

Class President: President Y. M. C. A.; Dramatic 
Club; Saber Company; Honor Council. '10-'ll; Pike 
County Club. 



'Hughie" 



84 



^^^^Th^ Reveille- ^z^^g^^ 




EDGAR GUY WADE. Tillman, Miss. 

Agriculture. 

Major Third Battalion. 

"Ed." is one of the most brilliant students we have 
and has always taken great interest in College affairs. 
His popularity may be judged from the list of clubs 
and organizations below. When idle, he likes to tell 
Joe of his prospects in the field of matrimony. He 
is crazy about the dances in town, but keeps a warm 
place in his heart for the girl in South Mississippi. 
He once expected to return to the farm, but has been 
tempted to enter educational work by many flatter- 
ing offers. 

Vice-President Senior Class; George Rifles, '09-'10; 
German Club. '11-'12; Philomathean Literary So- 
ciety, '10-'12; Dramatic Club. T0-'12; Junior Club, 
'10-'ll; First Sergeants' Club, '10-'ll: Second Captain 
Saber Company. '11-'12; Agricultural Club, '10-'12. 




"Edgar" 



85 



^5^gS5te^E*RE^BIlvI^ 1©1&^^^^" 





DAVIS LEROY WELDON, Van Vleet, Miss. 

Agriculture. 

Second Lieutenant Company "C." 

Weldon came from the unknowns of Chickasaw 
County sometime during the past. He is very pre- 
cise (?) in what he says, and his laughs are mislead- 
ing, because someone is apt to think he is tickled. 
During his time at college he has met with many 
difficulties, but we have found him able to overcome 
them. He has always made high marks in his 
studies, and in the future we expect to hear of him 
being among those who are actually in the arena. 
Weldon enjoys frequent visits home, and it is always 
convenient to stop off at West Point (for some cause 
or other). 

Y. M. C. A.. '08-'10; President Chickasaw County 
Club, '10-'ll; Vice-President Good Times Club, '10- 
'11; Agricultural Club, '10-'12; Class Football. '09-'12; 
P. P. D. Club, '10-'ll. 



'D. L." 



86 



"^s^ T>i£^ Rev^biul^ 1^12^5-%^^ 




JAMES THOMAS WEST. Waynesboro. Miss. 

Agriculture. 

Captain Company "K." 

Though theory may direct our inquiry, yet the re- 
sults of experiments must at last determine our 
opinions, for which reason we point to "Bob" as be- 
ing an experiment of much interest. Whether or not 
yen find him so, it is for you to decide. When he 
entered college he was thought to have come from 
the "country." "Perhaps" you would think so still. 
Bob is a favorite of the ladies. He has many re- 
enters to "call \u. 234" over the 'phone. However, 
such calls have not interfered with his duties — since. 
by the way, this is a part of his duties. We are well 
pleased with his accomplishments, and our wishes 
for him in the future will remain as they have here- 
tofore been. 

President Wayne County Club, '10-'12; Saber 
Company, '11-'12; First Sergeants. Club, 'lfl-'ll; 
Agricultural Club, '10-'ll; Vice-Director Agri- 
cultural Club. First and Second Terms; Good Times 
Clubs; 1912 Club: V. M. C. A., '09-T2; Membership 
Committee. '11*12. 




'Jim' 



87 



1£>12 





WINSTON EARL WHEAT. Mobile. Ala. 

Civil and Mining Engineering. 

Captain Company "B." 

Winston is one of the many good men of our 
class. He came to us as a Junior in '10, and has 
been a constant worker and one of the leading men 
of the class ever since. One of his many charac- 
teristics is that of keeping the best friendship of his 
great rival. He is a worker of the Y. M. C. A., and 
a man from every standpoint. Everyone that knows 
him is his friend. There are only two serious 
charges to be brought against Winston; that of 
"breaking hearts" and "attempting to murder the 
"Principle of Mechanics." We all take pleasure in 
wishing for him, and the "lucky lady" the greatest 
possible success. 

Y. M. C. A., '07-'12; Chairman. '12; Calendar; Ex- 
change and Reading Room; Philotechnic Literary 
Society, '07-'12; Parliamentarian. Second Term. '10- 
'11; Prosecuting Attorney, Second Term. '11-'12; M. 
A. S. E., '10-'12; Mississippi Sabres; Cosmopolitan 
Club, '07-'12; 1912 Club. 



"Shorty' 



1912 




MARK S. WOMACK, Mantee, Miss. 

Agriculture. 

First Lieutenant Company "G." 

Mark is from "Old Webster" and he intends go- 
ing back to invest his talents in her soil as soon as 
he graduates. His social disposition, combined with 
his grifts as a conversationist, makes his society 
very congenial, while his wonderful talents of im- 
personating the peculiarities of his different Profes- 
sors is a constant source of amusement to his 
friends. 

Mark is rather conservative about his love affairs, 
but from the long letters he gets from the "Lone 
Star State," we suspect that he cherishes the ambi- 
tion of some day transplanting a "Texas Flower" to 
a Mississippi garden. 

Dialectic Literary Society. '08-'12; Agricultural 
Club. '09-'12; Y. M. C. A., '08-'ll; Good Time Club. 
'10-T1: 1912 Club. '10-'ll; Masonic Club, '11-12; 
President Webster County Club. '11-'12. 




"Mark" 



^^^^^^TK^REV^BiiviyE- ^ifLtttm^^^ 



Senior Class History 

WE have come, we have seen, we have conquered, and unlike the faltering, 
the class of 1912 look forward. Our faces have ever been turned toward 
the future and not the past. Our history as a class has been spanned by 
four years of honest, patient, and pleasant work. Now that w r e have at 
last reached the summit of our goal, let us record the events of our victorious deeds 
and achievements, so that they may be inscribed on our own minds and on the memories 
of those who come after us, in order that they may praise and honor our courage and 
valor. 

It was during the year of 1908, while wandering through the dim, mystic vales 
of simplicity, unburdened at the time, by the weight of but little thought or reason, 
we suddenly became possessed of the enobling desire to delve in to the wearied, en- 
chanted world of knowledge, in order that we might edify and elevate our own lives 
and well as those with whom we might become associated. As a consequence of this 
vision, two hundred and seventy-five (275) boys made their appearance on the campus. 
During our Freshman and Sophomore years, nothing of special interest occured, save 
for two years of honest labor and the occasional falling by the wayside of some of the 
weary and footsore who went to join their kind in the easier walks of life. 

Time and space would not permit me to give a detailed account of our many 
adventures and achievements, so I will mention only a few. Probably the most im- 
portant event of our Junior year was that ever-to-be-remembered Junior Banquet, 
which served to unite us into one body more than any other one thing. Many, I am 
sure, will remember the Senior-Junior game in which we left the unfortunate Seniors 
in the "still gloomy defeat," and henceforth, we were idolized (?) by them as they 
pointed with pride to the following inscription on the water tank: "Juniors' Champions." 
Again we have reason to remember February 22d, 191 1, for that day we decided that 
the Father of our country would have said "cut," had he been living. Allow us to 
say in passing that we took our medicine without bleating. Our struggle for a distinc- 
tion of uniform, which was finally granted, has doubtless caused more discussion and 
wondering among the class than any other one thing. We feel proud of the trust 
and confidence the Faculty placed in us, and we have tried to be worthy of that trust. 

As a class, our motto and watchword has ever been "Class Unity." We have 
long since decided that "Together we stand, Divided we fall." What has been the 
interest of one has been the interest of all in class affairs. 

On the athletic field we have won honor and glory for our Alma Mater. During 
the last four years we have risen from the bottom place to one of the foremost in the 



90 



^^^^ The- Reveille- 1^12^5^^^ 



S. I. A. A., this being largely due to the efforts and playing of men belonging to our 
class, as well as the combined support of the whole class. We have had members of 
our class on every 'Varsity team that has represented the college since we entered 
school. The mere fact that nine of the eighteen, who made their "M" on the 'Varsity 
football team this year, speaks for our record on the "Gridiron." 

As Seniors, we have been true to the college we have learned to love so w 7 ell, and 
have done all we could for the development of her various activities. We honor truth, 
contribute to the relief of the poor and distressed, respect the Commandant and his 
military authority over the Seniors(?). We attend all dances and shows, swipe 
everything that is loose and not red hot, counsel the under classmen, and so live every 
day that we can look any "Prep" in the face and tell him to go to Chapel. Now that 
our race is about run, it is time to say farewell to our many friends and to each other. 
We realize that before us stretches a vista of unknown destiny, but we face this 
destiny with the same courage, determination, and perseverance as we have as a class 
and can't help but believe that we will be crowned with success, growth, and useful- 
ness such as will lead to the realization of our fondest desires. In conclusion we will 
say that though we have made mistakes, yet we feel that our school days have found 
us as manly as those of any class that has preceded or may succeed us. We leave with 
fond memories of halcyon days that time cannot efface. May God speed you and all 

that bears the name of A. & M. 

Historian'. 



IM50#1 







Ml 



^^SggSfe^B REW5BJL1B* l®lZ^0S Sse &r*' 



A Toast 

Here's to the Seniors, won strength and renown, 
Who fear not Professors, — their voice or their frown. 
This power and this knowledge with work they did pay, 
Diplomas they'll get in the sweet month o' May. 

Here's to Jack Hardy, our president dear, 
Won love in the Preps, and in Congress a fear ; 
If prayers and petitions can cause him to stay; 
Fear not Alma Mater, your future he'll lay. 

Here's to old "Billy," though hoary with age, 
On cigarettes and permits he's still all the rage. 
For manhood and honor he stands staunch and true, 
By your ideals, our teacher, we've learned to love you. 

Here's to the Colonel, so sour-faced and stern, 
Your new book of Tactics we care not to learn. 
High praise of us Seniors no doubt you've express'd, 
With orders and edicts, our sojourn you've blessed. 

Here's to the Faculty, with chairman and all, 

At kindly feet, Preps, for mercy do fall. 

Those lessons you've taught us, of duty and right, 

With bright swords of honor, life's battle we'll fight. 

Here's to our victors — our strong football team, 
You've honored a few, but the scrubs heavenly dream. 
'Twas sad how you shattered the hopes of "Ole Miss.," 
Now stern is reality — that "dope" caused such bliss. 

Here's to our crack baseball team, that we know, 
Will win all the victories Southland can grow. 
We've got some new men to try out this year, 
Just one more "Ole Miss." — do dry that sad tear. 

Here's to the track team, our old standard size. 
That "mopp'd up" in Gulfport, and took every prize. 
Now, track men, get nimble, and once more repeat, 
Next college contest we want every feat. 

We'll drink to the Seniors, with intellect keen, 
In wisdom, in valor, in love — that's not seen. 
The fairest a maiden — brave men — fair themselves. 
Let's drink to to the health of the dear class of '12. 

Poet. 



92 



-^^^^JfaB-REVvBIULE- l^l&^^^a^^ 



Senior Creed 



We believe in our institution, in its President, its Vice-President, its Com- 
mandant, and all who are in Power. 

We believe in Chapel Oratory ( ?), in the filing of irregular schedules ( ?), in the 
dismissal of Cadets, and the smoking of cigarettes on the sly. 

We believe in the Military Discipline, in the walking of extras, the serving of 
confinements, and the reducing of Corporals by the dozen. 

We believe in our Athletics and the burial of our opponents — especially after 
Thanksgiving. 

We believe in the Mississippi Legislature ( ?), in the saving of the State's wealth 
by denying its young men an education, and abolishing the Educational Institu- 
tions^). And in placing our State absolutely last in the onward march of civiliza- 
tion by any means known to our August and (Omnipotent Body of Law Makers. 

Amen and Amen. 




-.? 



1€>1& 



The Class 'Thirteen 

"Oh, feats, I write, and of the Best, whom Fate 

First in Nineteen and Nine gave A. & M. 

Fill many a joy — yes, full many of late; 

From the cup of hliss, filled to its brim. 

We have drank when the lights grew dim; 

In feasts of love, the best and sweetest e'er seen, 

We have revelled in happiness, peacefully sublime. 

List: 'tis that of the dearest, the best, — the "Class 'Thirteen!' 

"O, Muse, assist me and inspire my thought, 

I would write of Juniors, who alone 

Have their trials and battles faithfully fought, 

Who have nothing for which they must atone, 

But with records clear, the best ever shown, 

They shall advance with honors bright and clean, 

To Seniordom's bright, sparkling and crystalline dome. 

"Well done!" then can be said of — the "Class 'Thirteen." 

"Onward goes "our" class, progressing each day, 

In Science and Art; and as masters of men, 

We have marched through life. A vision far away, 

Bids us ever onward to the unceasing clatter and din 

Of noiseome strife by the Senior's gridiron and pen ; 

A vision that looms up in our happiest dreams, — 

A vision illimitable, brightness, noblest, without a sin, 

Look! 'tis a vision of — the "Class 'Thirteen." 



"Onward" — is our motto inscribed in words of fire, 

Our ringing slogan for each victory well won. 

Our prize "for the laborer worthy of his hire," 

When his successful Career's departing sun 

Has fallen o'er his happy days of work and fun, 

Is not that which should e'er always seem, 

For his race of Life has now only begun, — but 

'Tis ever the crv "Onward " for — the "Class 'Thirteen." 



Class Poet. 




junior Class 

OFFICERS 

Owens, \V. A President 

Prosser, J. L Vice-President 

Washburn, N. I Secretary and Treasurer 

McKinxey, I Historian 

Harrisox, B Cheer Leader 

Roper, P. E. .......... Poet 

Wingfiei.d, F. G. Sport 

Guerry, N. D Phool 

COLORS 
Purple and White 



MS 



^sssgz&sP^^ Reveille* l^i&^^^a^" 



NAME 
Armstrong, B. E. 
Backstrom, J. F. 
Barrentine, E. S. 
Bo wen, W. R. 
Bratton, J. 
Butler, E. 
Coleman, S. A. 
Critz, A. 
Crockett, E. C. 
Dent, W. W. 
Dodd, R. E. 
English, M. L. 
French, H. C. 
Guerrv, N. D. 
Hall, D. S. 
Hester, J. W. 
Harrison, B. 
Harrison, Lee 
Holmes, H. 
Joyner, V. H. 
Kirkpatrick, J. H. 
Lamb, John 
Lipe, R. E. 
McCleur, D. 
McCoy, L. E. 
McDonald, W. M. 
Mason, D. M. 
Mercier, D. 
Miller, M. E. 
Mingee, G. C. 
Mingee, W. M. 
Mitchell, Fred. 
O'Neal, C. E. 
Overstreet, C. A. 
Ramey, W. E. 
Ranev, H. 
Riley, J. W. 
Robeards, E. S. 
Roper, P. E. 
Scott, A. A. 
Scott, J. W. 
Smith, C. A. 
Solomon, H. 
Sides, L. M. 
Spikes, A. G. 
Sayle, F. L. 
Sharbrough, W. C. 
Tate, W. B. 
Thomae, E. D. 
Theloar, J. C. 



Agricultural Juniors 

COUNTY 

Perry 
Leflore 
Panola 
Hinds 
Octibbeha 
Attalla 
Octibbeha 
Coahoma 
Claiborne 
Yazoo 
Monroe 
Franklin 
Lowndes 
Louisiana 
Copiah 
Louisiana 
Lowndes 
Desota 
Octibbeha 
Winston 
Jefferson 
Quitman 
Hinds 
Scott 

Lauderdale 
Benton 
Copiah 
Marshall 
Jefferson 
Jefferson 
Jones 
Harrison 
Kemper 
Wayne 
Lauderdale 
Atalla 
Munroe 
Marshall 
Webster 
Louisiana 
Pike 

Washington 
Tennessee 
Lauderdale 
Yalabusha 
Yazoo 
Pike 

Lowndes 
Lafayette 
96 



CITY 

Memphis, Tenn. 

Richston 

Itta Bena 

Sardis 

Jackson 

Starkville 

Kosciuskio 

Starkville 

Friars Point 

Russum 

Yazoo City 

Aberdeen 

Hamburg 

Artesia 

Lousiana 

Hazlehurst 

New Orleans 

Columbus 

Plum Point 

Agricultural College 

Plattsburg 

Union Church 

Vance 

Jackson, R. 5 

Morton 

Vimville 

Springfiel d 

Beaureaguard 

Laws Hill 

Church Hill 

Church Hill 

Eastbuchie 

Wisdom 

DeKalb, R. 1 

Waynesboro 

Vimville 

McCool, R 3 

Quincy, R 1 

Byhalia 

Martell 

Ashwood 

Greenville 
Moscow 
Daleville, R 1 
Oakland, R 1 
Hollv Bluff 
Osyka, R 1 
Columbus 
Taylor, R 1 











•'7 



lmz 



Engineering Juniors 



NAME 




COUNTY 


CITY 


Anderson, E. C. 


C. E. 


Wilkinson 


Centerville 


Best, K. H. 


E. E. 


Montgomery 


Winona 


Bethea, R. O. 


E. E. 


Lamar 


Sumerall 


Blythe, A. T. 


C. E. 


Adams 


Natchez 


Body, G. 


E. E. 


Harrison 


Gulfport 


Brading, R. A. 


C. E. 


Bolivar 


Rosedale 


Brevard, B. P. 


C. E. 


Desoto 


Eudora 


Chadwick, A. R. 


E. E. 


Ohio 


Roxbury 


Cole, G. H. 


E. E. 


Yazoo 


Yazoo City 


Conaway, J. E. 


E. E. 


Tennessee 


Memphis 


Conn, E. B. 


M. E. 


Copiah 


Hazlehurst 


Davis, J. F. 


E. E. 


Lousiana 


Innis 


Doocy, E. B. 


E. E. 


Illinois 


Pittsfield 


Dunning, A. B. 


C. E. 


Yazoo 


Yazoo City 


Dupree, S. F. 


E. E. 


Yazoo 


Yazoo City 


Gentsch, H. S. 


E. E. 


Lauderdale 


Meridian 


Gilleland, R. V. 


M. E. 


Clarke 


Stonewall 


Gunter, G. 


E. E. 


Holmes 


West 


Hammons, C. R. 


E. E. 


Copiah 


Wesson 


Howard, L. H. 


C. E. 


Hinds 


Jackson 


Huff, S. P. 


C. E. 


Wilkinson 


Woodville 


Hurdle, E. F. 


C. E. 


Marion 


Slaydens 


Jordan, F. L. 


C. E. 


Holmes 


Lexington 


Latimer, R. A. 


C. E. 


Tate 


Thyatira 


Lo-e, D..W. 


E. E. 


Lincoln 


Brookhaven 


Lucas, R. L. 


M. E. 


Atalla 


Kosciuskio 


Middleton, W. G. 


M. E. 


Copiah 


Hazlehurst 


McKie, M. S. 


E. E. 


Tishomingo 


Iuka 


McMurphv, H. H. 


C. E. 


Scott 


Harpersville 


Moss, H. C. 


C. E. 


Okitibbeha 


Starkville 


Neilson, H. H. 


E. E. 


Hinds 


Jackson 


O'Brien, C. W. 


E. E. 


Lowndes 


Columbus 


Pearson, C. W. 


E. E. 


Claiborne 


Port Gibson 


Pierce, H. R. 


M. E. 


Webster 


Mathiston 


Prosser, J. L. 


E. E. 


Madison 


Ridgeland 


Rogers, J. R. 


E. E. 


Covington 


Ora 


Stevenson, H. M. 


E. E. 


Lauderdale 


Lauderdale 


Swain, J. H. 


C. E. 


Union 


New Albany 


Sullivan, O. D. 


C. E. 


Franklin 


Meadville 


Thomson, C. C. 


E. E. 


Atalla 


Kosciuskio 


Tinsley, C. M. 


M. E. 


Indiana 


Fort Wayne 


Watson, E. L. 


M. E. 


Covington 


Seminary 


Whitaker, ]. D. 


E. E. 


Hinds 


Oakley 


Williams, W. N. 


M. E. 


Prentiss 


Booneville 


Wingfield, F. G. 


C. E. 


Yalobusha 


Clarksdale 


York, C. V. 


M. E. 


Yalobusha 


Coffeeville 




99 



-'^^^^piE^REVSBILI/E- l®lZ^gme&^ 



Pedagogical Juniors 



NAME 
Cain, L. L. 
Dove, W. E. 
Fowler, Miss Susette 
Gladney, Miss Hortense 
Graham, F. C. 
Gunn, Miss Mabel 
Hansell, T. W. 
Harden, J. C. 
Jack, W. H. 
McGeehe-, T. F. 
McKinnie, I. 
Majure, J. E. 
Mingee, E. W. 
Nash, H. E. 
Owens, W. A. 
Sargent, E. F. B. 
Saul, R. L. 
Shelton, A. D. 
Walley, E. R. 
Washburn, N. I. 
Wells, P. L. 
Whitaker, F. H. 
Wooten, J. R. 



COUNTY 

Monre 

Franklin 

Oktibbeha 

Oktibbeha 

Wayne 

Oktibbeha 

Lee 

Choctaw 

Kemper 

Franklin 

DeSoto 

Newton 

Jefferson 

Atalla 

Tishomingo 

Choctaw 

Clay 

Copiah 

Greene 

Hinds 

Tishomingo 

Jefferson 

Noxubee 



CITY 

Prairie 

Hamburg 

Starkville 

Starkville 

Waynesboro, R I 

Starkville 

Nettleton 

McCool, R 2 

Scooba 

Little Springs 

Cockrum 

Dixon 

Churchhill 

Kosciusko 

Tishomingo 

Ackerman 

Montpilier 

Hazlehurst 

Richton, R i 

Clinton 

Iuka 

Natchez 

Brooksville 






1912 



Junior Class History 

Unlike the checkered career of the American republic in its early development, 
the class of '13 never falters or hesitates, but with a bold, fearless eye eagerly scans the 
future and welcomes and hastens to meet all approaching danger and opposition. We 
have passed along the calm, quiet avenues of love and friendship, crossed the placid 
streams of success and pride, we have also toiled up the difficult and gloomy mountain 
path of adversity, suffered in the burning desert sands of opposition and assaults, yet 
at no time or at any stage have our hearts grown faint or our determination less. The 
Rubicon has been reached, and even now a ringing cry of "the die is cast" is echoing 
and re-echoing along the distant hills. 

We have had a long inning and a fruitful one. It has been one of unbroken suc- 
cesses achieved under difficulties, yet finished in truly regal style. Our Junior year 
has been the "golden age" of the class. Having the largest class that ever assembled 
at the A. & M. and having in it boys (and girls) who possess not only the re- 
quisites, but the incentives to do something, it is of little surprise that we have ac- 
complished great things. 

In every phrase of college life we have given the best we possess, whether it be 
on the gridiron, the diamond, in the recitation room, or the shops, honesty and perse- 
verance have been our ideals. We have able men in every branch of athletics, and 
indeed we have furnished the captains for two teams this year. And that is not all; 
the men who receive the hard knocks on the football field, or catch the hot ones on the 
diamond are also among the leaders of the school in academic work, where we again 
take high rank and bid fare to establish new records and new forms. 

We can also boast of our military geniuses, for we have our Caesar's, Welling- 
ton's, and Lee's, and in some future time when the deeds of heroism of the world's 
greatest soldiers entitle them to be numbered among the truly great, we do not doubt 
that a member of the class of '13 will be found among them. 

In an entirely different, but equally important field, the social circle, we have 
many representatives. And do you wonder at finding them there ? You should not ; 
for having among our number, three beautiful and fascinating co-eds, it is little 
wonder that the brilliant society of Starksville reaps the reward of the effects of 
Cupid's artless arrows. 

Ere many weeks have come, we will have passed from the Utopian realms of 
Juniordom to the strange, chaotic, unfathomable abyss of Seniordom, and in a few 
months the class of '13 will be no more. But the love, the record, the friends, and 
the imperishable memories of our noble and courageous band will be passed into the 
history of our dear old Alma Mater as the one bright light of the final epoch of the 
old regime. 

Historian. 



^^^^^^ThB-RE^BILIvB- i^lg^^^^S^^ 




103 



1©12 



Agricultural Sophomore Class 



NAME 
Adams, W. W. 
Alderman, W. H. 
Allen, J. L. 
Ames, W. P. 
Anderson, J. W. 
Bailey, R. L. 
Barksdale, L. J. 
Bell, H. C. 
Berry, J. T. 
Bibbv, F. F. 
Bond, C. A. 
Bowlin, R. L. 
Bridgeforth, R. M. 
Brien, J. N. 
Brown, L. 
Brumfield, C. W. 
Bullock, E. W. 
Bullock 
Burlett, L. C. 
Burns, J. B. 
Butts, J. L. 
Byrd, E. K. 
Calhoun, C. W. 
Campbell, J. R. 
Carpenter, S. E. 
• Coleman, J. W. 
Cook, A. B. 
Coook, F. D. 
Crawford, G. L. 
Darnall, A. L. 
Davis, H. W. 
Dean, R. A. 
Dickey, R. M. 
Dodson, H. H. 
Downs, H. E. 
Evans, L. F. 
Fleming, B. J. 
Fleeming, R. L. 
Fox, A. S. 
Gamble, J. W. 
Garman, R. I. 
Gilbert, R. P. 
Graham, J. C. 



NAME 
Gray, G. W. 
Green, T. K. 
Griffin, S. D. 
Grimes, D. W. 
Haynie, J. C. 
Heliums, T. L. 
Hester, J. C. 
Hewitt, H. H. 
Hinton, C. R. 
Hollingsworth, J. E. 
Gaines, F. A. 
King, R. V. 
Kizer, J. W. 
Lee, L. O. 
Lenoir, G. H. 
Lockard, N. B. 
Lomineck, W. R. 
McArthur, W. B. 
McBee, J. S. 
McCandless, D. A. 
McCartv, J. C. 
McClure, J. C. 
McCullough, J. D. 
McDemott, R. J. 
McElroy, H. H. 
McGeehee, A. F. 
McHenry, A. B. 
Mclnnis, R. 
McKay, H. M. 
McKewen, J. S. 
McPherson, H. A. 
McPherson, H. L. 
McReynolds, E. C. 
Montcrieth, N. S. 
Moore, J. B. 
Mounger, C. T. 
Naff, H. H. 
Nelson, C. B. 
Noble, C. R. 
Olson, L. A. 
Oneal, J. R. 
Pace, L F. 
Pace, W. B. 



NAME 



Parker, C. G. 
Parker, W. D. 
Perkins, S. V. 
Pigford, W. E. 
Pope, A. G. 
Powers, H. T. 
Peu, P. W. 
Priddy, E. H. 
Reid, A. K. 
Reed, M. D. 
Reed, R. S. 
Phodes, A. L. 
Riggan, R. C. 
Robbins, J. N. 
Roberds, C. E. 
Robinson, W. E. 
Rogers, R. R. 
Roseborough, |. L. 
Russell, D. M. 
Sasser, H. A. 
Scott, R. A. 
Sheehi, B. S. 
Smith, C. B. 
Smith, L. O. 
Stennis, H. O. 
Stewart, W. W. 
Strahan, L. C. 
Taylor, M. G. 
Thorsen, K. W. 
Tingle, J. T. 
Tooms, T. 
Walker, F. W. 
Walker, I. C. 
Wiley, E. H. 
Watkins, R. S. 
Watson, T- A., Jr. 
Watson, J. G. 
Welch, R. W. R. 
White, E. F. 
White, R. P. 
Wilkinson, D. A. 
Williams, D. I. 
York, W. 



104 




IMS 



1£>12 



Engineering Sophomores 



Abernathy. H. G. 
Allerman, A. B. 
Anderson, M. M. 
Anderson, W. L. 
Armstrong. H. G. 
Baker, F. 

Birdenharn. H. A. 
Bolton, W. F. 
Boone, S. J. 
Bradford. P. S. 
Bradley. H. R. 
Busby, R. E. 
Bynum, W. M. 
Cary. L. A. 
Cavett, J. R. 
Chalk, A. D. 
Chinn, T. G. 
Clardy. W. J. 
Cole, J. H. 
Collins. J. J. 
Consley, H. L. 
Cox, J. E. 
Critz, S. P. 
Cryines. T. P. 
Durham, J. H. 
Durst. J. S. 
Faircloth, J. L. 
Frederick, I. C. 
French. H. L. 
Gaither. H. 
Heard, J. M. 
Hines, W. M. 
House. J. B. 
Hunter, E. E. 
King, J. D. 
Kinney, H. C. 
Knight. J. R. 
Kyle, H. A. 
Lindley. W. C. 
Livingston, J. M. 
Luker, M. B. 
Lyons, J. D. 
McAmis. J. C. 
McCoy, R. G. 
McGilvia. B. L. 
Mclllheny, G. N. 
Mason, J. G. 



Woodland 

Gulfport 

Meridian 

May hew 

Memphis 

Jackson. Tenn. 

Vicksburg 

Biloxi 

Wanilla 

Biloxi 

Jackson 

Buccatunna 

Sessums 

Lake City 

Jackson 

Meridian 

Biloxi 

West Point 

Jackson 

Hardy 

Water Valley 

Colliersville 

Starkville 

Hattiesburg 

Clarksdale 

Nittayums 

luka 

Walnut 

Starkville 

Para Avis 

Aberdeen 

Wesson 

Senatobia 

Spinks 

Agr. College 

Vicksburg 

Love 

Saltillo 

Baldwyn 

Tupelo 

luka 

Vicksburg 

Corinth 

Martin 

Brandon 

Forest 

Quitman 



Miller. O. J. 
Owin. R. 
Overstreet, C. 
Pepper, J. H. 
Peterson. J. B. 
Rose, F P. 
Ruffin, R. 
Ruffin, W. F. 
Sherman. H. S. 
Springer, M. E. 
Stansell. H. S. 
Strahan, E. K. 
Thornton, S. 
Tillman, A. G. 
Waddell. H. M. 
Weaver, W. B. 
West. J. D. 
Willis, L. A. 
Woodtin, A. E. 

Brooks. C. S. 
Owens, C. W. 
Smith, R. R. 
Rogers. J. T. 
Bransford, R. W. 
Carothers, A. B. 
Cook, T. I. 
Courts. W. F 
Cox, C. G. 
Cox. C. J. 
Duvall, J. S. 
Dyess, C. R. 
Green, C. D. 
Hey. C. H. 
Holmes, J. E. 
Hudson. A. J. 
Kohorn, S. 
Lewis, R. E. 
Lewy. H. E. 
Longest. T. 
Manning, L. L. 
Mount, E. B. 
Rye. B. W. 
Sanders, L. C. 
Smith, J. F. 
Spitzkeit. W. H. 
Verner, C. 



Jackson 

Starkville 

Moss Point 

Yazoo City 

Brooksville 

Zazoo City 

Como 

Como 

Columbus 

Agr. College 

Columbus 

Mount Olive 

Baldyn 

Vicksburg 

Columbus 

Columbus 

Kosciusko 

Elizabeth 

Okolona 

Agr. College 

Germantown 

Carledona 

Pickens 

Okolona 

Starkville 

Deatur 

Yazoo City 

Jackson 

Columbus 

Lumberton 

Stonewall 

Starkville 

Castille 

Memphis 

Hudsonville 

Starkville 

Meridian 

Greenville 

Pontotoc 

Grew 

Woodville 

Hamilton 

Corinth 

Jacksonville 

Bogue Chitto 

Hamilton 



1 06 




ic>7 



-^^^^^lhE-RE^E>ILL^ l®lZ^g S s$ mS p>^' 



Pedagogical Sophomores 

Arnold. W. A. Mantee 

Banks, H. H. Forest 

Bearden, H. J. Holmesville 

Bedenbaugh, M. M. Como 

Bolton. J. L. Newton 

Bozeman, T. I. Prentiss 

Buckley. J. T. Enterprise 

Brewer, M. I. Aberdeen 

Caraway, J. O. Liberty 

Clark. T. C. Ruth 

Cockerham. K. L. Quincy 

Crumpton, H. B. Yazoo City 

Coppedge, E. E. Senatobia 

Fagg. L. W. Maben 

Goza, E. D. Wilsonville 

Cranberry, C. E. Lake 

Greer, C. K. Potts Camp 

llalitt. A. VV. Vicksburg 

Jacobs, R. D. Wiggins 

Johnson. O. E. Sebastopol 

Livingston, J. S. Sturgis 

Lacy, S. B. Benton 

Patterson, T. M. McComb City 

Powell, Mrs. Pearl Agr. College 

Pittman. C. C. Tylertown 

Rosenbaum, D. M. Meridian 

Sanders, P. H. Kosciusko 

Smith. M. E. McCalls Creek 

Swilley. H. E. Wesson 

Thweatt, W. K. Coldwater 

Vaughn. M. C. Caledonia 

Watson, H. T. Greenville 

Whalley, H. M. Potts Camp 

Wingo, G. W. Holmesville 

Wall. W. E. Lux 



1 08 




PEDAGOGICAL SOPHOMORES 



!<><) 



^^s^sss^^Re^billi^ lGiz^gssses^ 



Sophomore Class History 

In the fall of 191 1, there were assembled on A. & M.'s campus about two 
hundred and seventy "ringtails" and "privates" ready to be subjected to the most 
strenuous year of the whole college course — that of Sophomore year. Our history has 
been one of courage, effort, and toil ; and parallel with this, indeed, resulting from our 
efforts, it has been one of success, glory, and accomplishment. Especially has our 
course been marked with success since September. Our whole class has united into 
one strong, compact body working for the good of all. Setting our whole forces 
against every difficulty and discouragement, we have mounted the hill of obstacle, and 
bid fair the summit of success. In the class room, in oratory, and in athletics, we 
have been in a sphere all our own. Aside from the regular routine of events which 
are experienced in the Sophomore year, we have accomplished some feats above the 
ordinary. In fact, this class is much above the average, and it is some things about 
this extraordinary class that we wish to make mention. 

Class '14 is by far the largest Sophomore class that has ever matriculated at this 
college during its existence. Last year there were about one hundred seventy-five 
Sophomores, this year there are about two hundred seventy. 

We speak with pleasure of the beginning in this year of an inter-class oratorical 
contest between the Sophomore class of A. & M. and that of Millsaps College. This 
contest took place at Moorehead, Mississippi. The "eventful" of this is that we are the 
first class of this institution to go into joint debate with another class from another 
institution. 

For the first time in years the individual classes have been given the priviledge 
of editing an issue of the College Reflector. We are the first class and the lowest 
class to attempt to publish an edition this session. In how far we have succeeded, let 
the Reflector speak for itself. 

Probably the feats that showed more grit and for which the class, and more 
especially the players, deserve more praise than for any other, was the winning of the 
class championship in football and basketball. This is the first time the Sophomores 
have won the championship in football, and is the first time that any class has won 
championship in basketball. 

The history of this class has been so very successful that we look forward to still 
greater and grander achievements in 191 3 and 1 9 14. 

Historian. 



^^^^^ThE- Reveille- lmg^^g^^ 




OFFICERS 

Varnado, O. D President 

Anderson, J. C. . . . . . . . . Vice-President 

Hurst, F. H. .......... Secretary 

Bending, H. ......... Treasurer 

Browning, R. I Historian 

Tucker, H. L. . . . . . . . . . . Poet 

Freeman, G. M. Phool 

GuiCE, J. G Cheer Leader 




1912 



Agricultural Freshmen 



Adams, N. S. 
Anders, C. B. 
Anderson, J. C. 
Andrews, G. D. 
Anthony, J. C. 
Arnold, G. F. 
Ashe, A. K. 
Bacot, G. W. 
Bacot, M. C. 
Bailey; T. W. 
Baker, H. G. 
Barron, D. N. 
Beard, L. O. 
Bearden, C. C. 
Bending, H. 
Blackburn, E. 
Blanton, C. H. 
Blythe, J. C. 
Boiling, R. L. 
Boyd, H. L. 
Brannaman, H. W. 
Branning, W. J- 
Breland, G. W. 
Brown, N. H. 
Brunson, F. 
Bullock, C. T, 
Bynum, E. K. 
Carter, H. H. 
Carr, T. C. 
Carey, L. C. 
Craffin, J. 
Chambers, L. C. 
Cobb, E. 
Cothern, H. J. 
Cox, H. E. 
Critz, J. E. 
Crow, L. J. 
Curet, A. B. 
Deen, E. E. 
Deen, S. R. 
Dickey, E. K. 
Dunlap, R. L. 
Durham, M. B. 



Dunnaway, L. L. 
Elzey, E. V. 
Feigler, W. L. 
Flanagan, H. G. 
Fleming, C. D. 
Fletcher, L. 
Flowers, B. H. 
Flowers, F. L. 
French, C. O. 
Gaither, E. 
Gaither, W. 
Grantham, H. G. 
Gunn, J. A. 
Gray, L. H. 
Grisham, C. C. 
Harris, R. C. 
Hartman, D. C. 
Hinton, E. F. 
Hoggett, E. L. 
Holton, J. C. 
Howard, F. M. 
Howell, J. F. 
Howell, W. C. 
Hurst, F. J. 
Hurst, F. H. 
Ingram, I. C. 
Jeffery, Y. B. 

kidd, j. c. 

Kimball, H. H. 
Kite, J. C. 
Lee, B. F. 
Leggett, H. H. 
Lofton, W. 
Lomineck, L. P. 
Martin, R. R. 
Massengill, W. K. 
Maxwell, A. 
McArther, H. 
Mclntyre, C. S. 
McPherson, E. M. 
McMullen, C. J. 
McWilliams, L. C. 
McWilliams, W. R. 



Moore, S. R. 
Morgan, E. G 
Mortimer, T. C. 
Montgomery, T. H. 
McNeil, S. C. 
My res, M. P. 
Neil, S. C. 
Nicholes, L. E. 
Passmore, E. R. 
Peterson, J. G. 
Peterson, J. D. 
Peters, C. G. 
Pitchford, C. M. 
Power, O. J. 
Ragland, E. L. 
Rainey, E. 
Rogers, A. M. 
Rogers, F. 
Rowan, W. H. 
Reid, L. A. 
Redden, M. 
Rilev, W. C. 
Saul, S. S. 
Scott, J. C. 
Seals, T. L. 
Smith, G 
Still, W. E. 
Sistrunk, J. S. 
Standifer, W. E. 
Suttle, A. D. 
Terry, J. E. 
Treleaven, H. H. 
Thomas, S. M. 
Taylor, R. W. 
Tubb, W. L. 
Vaughen, R. O. 
Watson, I. 
West, H. G. 
Whittington, C. E. 
White, R. W. 
Walker, H. L. 
White, C. D. 




H3 



^^g^^lhB- Rev^iddb* img^ 



Engineering Freshmen 



Alleman, A. F. 
Ames, W. B. 
Anderson, C. L. 
Barntt, A. T. 
Black, R. W. 
Blackwood, G. T. 
Bond, R. C. 
Bounds, H. G. 
Causey, H. F. 
Clower, C. A. 
Cozzani, O. C. 
Crossett, J. L., Jr. 
Cunningham, W. W. 
Cygon, L. 
Daniel, W. 
Dasher, W. R. 
Dillard, C. L. 
Feigler, B. C. 
Foster, J. C. 
Freeman, J. Z. 
Frentz, G. P. 
Fuller, H. H. 
Gaston, B. W. 



Gathings, J. C. 
Gholston, J. G. 
Guice, J. G. 
Hart/og, J. E. 
Huit, P. H. 
Jones, W. H. 
Johnson, D. 
Knotts, W. W. 
Marshall, A. R. 
Mathews, B. E. 
McArthur, D. 
McCaskill, K. H. 
McDade, W. M. 
McGee, W. J. 
McLavy, J. R. 
Moorman, J. S. 
Munn, F. E. 
Nesbitt, R. D. 
Nethery, S. R. 
Netto, L. J. 
O'Brien, L. B. 
Olive, J. M. 
Pearre, W. R. 



Potter, F. E. 
Potter, V. S. 
Price, E. B. 
Prichard, D. L. 
Rooks, C. G. 
Scott, Roger 
Shaifer, G. A. 
Smith, C. A. 
Smith, M. P. 
Smith, Y. 
Steadman, G. R. 
Taylor, W. P. 
Tucker, H. L. 
Turner, D. O. 
Varnado, O. D. 
Walker, W. W. 
Wall, W. P. 
Westbrook, R. A. 
White, C. D. 
Wooten, W. D. 
Worthington, F. H. 
York, E. L. 



GENERAL SCIENCE 
Browning, R. I. Ellard, F. 

Coffey, G. C. Enochs, J. W. 

Crane, J. W. Freeman, A. M. 

Crawford, W. W. 



TEXTILE COURSE 
Pace, H. B. Rife, R. S. 

Jackson, W. S. Ruffin, D. A. 



114 




1 1.5 



"^s^g^a^T^ Reveille- loig^g^aap^ 



Pedagogical Freshmen 



Anderson, J. R., Jr. 
Armstrong, S. C. 
Boswell, M. 
Brashier, C. E. 
Cooper, G. P. 
Crump, W. B. 
Davis, W. R. 
Golden, W. W. 
Greer, R. A. 
Hathorn, E. 
Hickman, A. E. 
Longest, H. B. 
Lott, V. D. 
Vavender, F. C. 
Massey, L. L. 
McCalley, J. B. 
Parks, L. 
Pentecost, E. L. 
Pierce, W. W. 
Prisock, N. 
Smith, E. H. 
Sweat, F. B. 
Torrens, L. M. 
Tucker, R. L. 
Underwood, C. K. 
Watts, J. C. 
Winkler, M. H. 



Zeiglerville 

Vaiden 

Quitman 

Shubert 

Pacuta 

Peete 

Vaiden 

Taylorsville 

Pott Camp 

Bassfield 

Noxapoter 

Pontotoc 

Seminary 

Scooba 

Coldwater 

Memphis 

Etta 

Coila 

Sebastopol 

Louisville 

French Camp 

Hesterville 

Battlefield 

Holly Springs 

Sebastopol 

Meridian 

Meridian 



116 




PEDAGOGICAL FRESHM EN 



117 



^^^^^^Th^RE^^iiviv]^ lmz^^^^ 



Freshman Class History 

To forecast achievement is a difficult thing, but certain it is that the rare ex- 
pectancy, the planning and the anticipation of a brilliant future is ours. The word fresh- 
man may be associated, by persons of the baser sort, with such satirical epithets as 
"Freshie," "Plebe," and other slang expressions contrived by ingenius members of other 
classes to perpetuate the College jokes. To some this may seem unjust and humiliating, 
but nevertheless the members of our class are not wanting in those good qualities that 
will enable them to bear it without a murmur ; and we believe that this is one step in the 
direction of the goal for which we are striving. In after years our troubles here will 
all be forgotten, and we will recall, with pleasure, these happy days of our novice year 
at College. 

Perhaps this class is not an exceptional one, though we have many good men 
among our number who are destined for a career of achievement. Our opportunities 
have not been so great perhaps as those of other classes, but we have conquered the 
difficulties that have presented themselves at the beginning of our career at this institu- 
tion. We can boast of having the largest number of men of any Freshman class in 
the history of the College. In the recitation room we have done excellent work, and, in 
fact, men from our ranks are found in all the activities of College life. 

On the football field we are represented by, a certain "Chick," (Magee), a huge 
"Pewee," (Mills), and a jovial Kimball, whose names will go down in the 'Varsity 
football annals as memorials to the class of '15. Among the scrubs and those who 
hope to make the M next year, we are profusely represented. Why we did not win 
the class championship in football this session is a mystery and a strange puzzle to us. 
Our other commendable merits may be presented in concise order ; versatility in ex- 
plaining reports, calm endurance, and stoical heroism in walking extras. We have sur- 
mounted these barriers and, at the beginning of next session, we will not tremble at 
the awe inspiring cilmax of ascending into the ranks of the upper classmen. Indeed, to 
those aspirants for the distinction of corporal it will be a moment of proud triumph. 

"Old Freshman year 
After all you're not a knave. 
We'll cherish long the joy you gave, 
And shed a tear upon your grave, 

Old Freshman year." 

Historian. 



118 



~^m&£%m^^ Rev^ili^ i®±g^0§sg£0^ 



Sub-Freshman Class 



OFFICERS 



Denton, C L. 
Collins, H. H. 
Kimbell. G. B. 
Hamilton. J. R. 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Class Historian 




119 



"^^^^^hE*RE^E>ILL^ KH&^gSSsagS^ 



Second Year Training Course 



Allen, Y. J. 
Antimarch, P. H. 
Ball, P. Y. 
Barber, A. H. 
Barnes, J. D. 
Bates, E. A., Jr. 
Baylis, J. W. 
Bethea, J. D. 
Birdsong, F. J. 
Bounds, W. R. 
Brougher, F. S. 
Bullock, E. L. 
Butler, K. L. 
Calcote, W. H. 
Cassidv, T. P. 
Childress, R. L. 
Clark, T- W. 
Cliburn, W. B. 
Conger, B. C. 
Courts, Miss Grace 
Covington, D. E. 
Craft, F. L. 
Crawford, C. D. 
Critz, G. H. 
Crow, R. L. 
Crutherds, W. R. 
Cutrer, T. H. 
Dewees, H. H. 
DeGraffenreid, R. S. 
Dewees, M. F. 
Denton, C. L. 
Dorrill, P. 
Fisher, H. L. 
Fontenot, J. A. 
Fulmer, H. K. 
Gammill, R. W. 
Gammill, J. H. 
Gannaway, J. J. 
Garner, L. C. 
Gilemore, W. E. 
Gipson, J. V. 
Gonia, I. C. 
Goza, K. 
Gwin, H. F. 



Haimes, W. W. 
Hamilton, A. G. 
Hamilton, J. R. 
Hamilton, S. T. 
Harris, S. T. 
Harrison, S. D. 
Helm, S. D. 
Henkel, M. R. 
Henry, J. O. 
Horton, J. Robt. 
Hooper, I. M. 
Huff, V. E. 
Jack, J. E ; , Jr. 
Johnson, G. E. 
[opes, E 
Kelley, T. E. 
Killingsworth, C. V. 
Kimbell, G. B. 
Kimbrough, M. M. 
King, L. R. 
Larr, D. B. 
Lambert, C. T. 
Lea, L. E. 
Leverett, J. P. 
Lewis, H. D. 
Lowery, E. C. 
McAllum, W. 
McGovern, L. 
McGregor, P. N. 
Mcintosh, T. L. 
McKee, J. A. 
McNeese, L O. 
Mayfleld, W. B. 
Nance, R. R. 
Odom, H. W. 
Owens, C. F. 
Pou, W. L. 
Powell, C. E. 
Powell, L. W. 
Powell, X. G. 
Pride, F. G. 
Read, C. S. 
Rich, J. C. 
Roberts, J. N., Jr. 



Robertson, M. L. 
Robertson, O. W. 
Roby, J. D. 
Russ, W. D. 
Sanders, B. B. 
Scoates, H. W. 
Scott, Wm. J. 
Sharder, W. H. 
Sipe, H. H. 
Smith, H. M. 
Steinburg, B. 
Stevens, E. B. 
Stevens, H. W. 
Stewart, F. E. 
Stewart, G. R. 
Stewart, J. R. 
Stogsdill, O. W. 
Sumrall, R. E. 
Tardy, T. W. 
Tate, T. T- 
Terry, G. B. 
Thomas, A. L. 
Thomas, S. E. 
Treadway, H. E. 
Turnage, P.. H. 
Turner, G. M. 
Turner, J. W. 
Turner, C. S. 
Vaughn, J. W. 
Wade, J. C. 
Walker, T. W. 
Watkins, R. R. 
Watts, T- L. 
Wells, H. L. 
Wells, H. L. 
Wiggins, B. B. 
Williams, F. W. 
Williams, L. M. 
Williams, G. T. 
Wood, J. 
Wood, W. L. 
Wright, W. W. 
Young, J. R. 



1£>12 



First Year Training Course 



Adams, S. C. 
Ball, D. D. 
Ball, I. H. 
Bennett, W. E. 
Blackwood, H. G. 
Bounds, J. E. 
Bowie, J- M. 
Brock, D. C. 
Burrow, H. H. 
Butchee, H. M. 
Carpenter, J. H. 
Carter, J. S. 
Cassanora, A. H. 
Clark, R. E. 
Clayton, J. J. 
Cochran, I. B. 
Cobb, D. C. 
Cohea, L. C. 
Cook, J. W. 
Cooley, J. J. 
Cooper, V. E. 
Cotton, E. B. 
Couch, F. B. 
Crenshaw, E. F. 
Curet, G. J. 
Davis, E. D. 
Davis, L. B. 
Dent, R. C. 
Dill, A. E. 
Dillard, C. L. 
Edwards, G P. 
Eubanks, B. F. 
Forbes, H. H. 
Fruente, A. R. 



Gabriel, E. R. 
Giffin, J. W. 
Goddard, E. M. 
Goode, M: D. 
Grisham, C. R. 
Hall, S. F. 
Harmon, S. A. 
Harper, W. W. 
Harris, O. P. 
Harris, S. A. 
Head, M. T. 
Hubbard, R. E. 
Hudson, R. E. 
Hull, H. C. 
Jurney, L. S. 
Kearnev, E. W. 
King, L. R. 
Lay, W. H. 
Loqan, F. Y. 
Long, W. C. 
McArthur, R. 
McBeath, W. C. 
McCaskill, M. M. 
McGee, A. L. 
McFarland, E. A. 
McFadden, T. 
McMullan, I. Q. B. 
Malone, W. B. 
Mathews, J. L. 
Maxwell, N. B. 
Mliler, D. W. 
Mims, L. D. 
Mitchell, G. Y. 
Mvers, H. F. 



Neel, J. R. 
Parham, H. 
Prewit, I. R. 
Price, E. K. 
Price, T. G 
Ranck, W. A. 
Reynolds, M. G. 
Rice, J. W. 
Rich, A. A. 
Rich, C. S. 
Richardson, J. D. 
Rogan, C. C. 
Rogers, B. 
Russell, L. M. 
Simmons, V. L. 
Sims, W. A. 
Smith, C. S. 
Smith, G. W. 
Smith, J. C. 
Sorrels, R. L. 
Stevenson, A. D. 
Stewart, T. W. 
Taylor, T. R. 
Thames, ]. H. 
Till, J. A. 
Travis, B. S. 
Turner, J. M. 
Upchurch, G A. 
Walker, A. E. 
Walton, B. 
Watson, C. C. 
Watron, W. H. 
Wofford, J. W. 
Young, W. T. 



Allen, E. J. 
Barnes, W. J. 
Barrett, J. D. 
Beauchamp, C. E. 
Beeson, C. A. 
Bell, T- F. 
Blanks, H. H. 
Povken, O. L. 



SUB-FRESHMEN 

Coaker, D. C. 
DeLoach, G. D. 
Doughty, R. E. 
Du£"an, G E., Jr. 
GraVm, H. A." 
He-der:o % J. C. 
Hendero^, T. C. 
He~der;-o\ L. D. 



Hurt, A. C. 
Kellev, H. W. 
Martin, H. E. 
Poeers, C. G. 
Wade, T- L 
Wade, S. I. 
Westberrv, S. D. 




123 



lb Reveille- 1^12^%^^ 



Prep History 

On Wednesday morning, September the twentieth, nineteen hundred and eleven, 
the Chapel bell summoned the students of the Mississippi Agricultural and Me- 
chanical College to assemble in the College Auditorium. Two hundred and sixty-eight 
"Preps" responded to its tones. We differed very much in stature and intellect, but 
were all of the same color — green. Many of us had arrived a few days before and 
had caught a glimpse of the buildings and external appearance of things in general, 
but this was the first time the majority of us had even an idea of what College life 
meant. Other things too were new to us. In the mess hall we learned what "zip"' 
and "wasp nest" meant, and we soon came to the conclusion that guarding the dormi- 
tory was no easy task. We could hear "bugle calls like we never heard before that 
made us want to go" — home. About a week later our class began in "Prep heaven." 
Then we had something to occupy our time and gradually overcame our home-sick- 
ness. Our work has grown more interesting to us each day. 

As a Class, we are united and stand ready to combat the obstacles that confront 
us, and thereby get strength to battle with the problems of life. We realize that the 
greater part of our College life is before us. The goal that we are trying to reach is 
is far ahead. The "Preps" have taken part in most activities confronted here. They 
have supported the Y. M. C. A., and Athletics, as well as the College publications. 
Many of the men from the Preparatory classes during previous years, owe their suc- 
cess in life, in a way, to the things they have learned while "Preps" here. Though 
we sometimes have to brush up against difficult propositions, we know that this is what 
it takes to make a real man. When we reach the goal in the distance, we will have 
attained as much as any of those who have gone before. Many of our men will have 
fallen by the wayside no doubt, but men from the high schools over the state will 
come in to take their places. No doubt, our number will be increased during our 
Freshman year. The old "Preps," however, will make their mark in life. Our 
journey seems long and toilsome, but ere long the time will come for us to leave the 
scenes of our many joys, pleasures, and hardships, and march off to fight life's battles.. 
We look forward with joy to that bright spring day in 191 6, when, with diplomas in 
hands, we will leave our dear old Alma Mater to take our places in the ranks of those 

who are doing great things for humanity. 

Historian. 



124 



-^^tt^a&J)^ Reveille- i®ig^ 1 gm 3 g&^ 

The Last Will and Testament 

of the Senior Class of the Agricultural and Mechanical 
College of Mississippi. 

To whom it may concern : 

We, the Senior Class of the Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College, 
being of sound mind and body, and being mindful of the fact that we are soon to 
leave forever the scene of our many joys and hardships, and wishing to compensate in 
some measure for our absence, do hereby make this our last will and testament. 

To "Jack," our President, who has been largely responsible for the growth of 
this institution and for his great love for this institution, we give and bequeath: 

1. All rights for the introduction of daily Chapel visitors who believe in this 
institution, in the work being done by this institution, in that which this institution 
stands for; who believe in the young manhood of Mississippi and its development 
through this institution. 

2. The gratification of his wish that some day "Jack," Jr., may stand out as 
the invincible "southpaw" and star quarterback on the A. & M. diamond and gridiron. 

3. A legislature which has higher aspirations than to create a Farmer's Union, 
and whose investigation committees have previously learned the difference between a 
radiator and an improved fire escape. 

To "Billy," because of his ardent love for long Chapel speeches, we give and 
bequeath : 

1. The sole right to limit speakers during Chapel to ten or fifteen minutes. 

2. The possession of a patent chicken coop for the safe keeping of his Christmas 
turkey. 

3. The privilege of caring for all executive business during the absence of the 
President. 

4. The filing of all irregular and special schedules in his office. 
To "Buzz," our enthusiastic athletic advisor, we leave: 

1. The right to act in an insane manner, unbecoming a professor of his rank, 
whenever the A. & M. shall defeat the University in football. 

2. The exclusive right to monopolize all laughing of the faculty during Chapel. 
To "Peter Parley," our eminent "bull herder," we bequeath: 

1. All brogan shoes made by the Hamilton Brown Shoe Company during the 
next decade. 

2. A new laugh with which to laugh at his own jokes. 

To the Commandant for his strenuous attempts to make this a second West 
Point, we will and bequeath : 

1. All green "preps." 

2. Faculty supervision as follows: right to report: Professor Hutchinson for 
crying and whining during Chapel, "Fckie," for slipping into Chapel through the 
front way, Peter Parley, for continual lateness at Chapel exercises. 

125 



^^^^^E^Re^BIULI^ l^lfi^^^^T^ 



3. All corporalships belonging to the Sophomores. 

To "Eckie, ' for his tiresome efforts to make a suitable garden out of the campus, 
we leave : 

1. All steam shovels, scrapers, and other grading implements in Mississippi. 

2. The right to move all dirt back to its original place at such a time as he 
sees fit. 

To "Pap," for his untiring assistance toward promotion and settlement of stu- 
dent clubs and organizations, we leave: 

1. A text-book which sets forth his views on all economical problems. 

2. The privilege of holding special examinations for all students deficient in de- 
partment of History and Civics. 

As a token of kind remembrance and not wishing to slight, we give and bequeath 
to: 

Ard, radiators that will radiate rather than refrigerate. 

Critz, a slot machine well stacked with gum, and from which he may obtain an 
occasional fresh supply. 

"Sissy," exclusive rights to exclaim, "Crystal Violets," whenever angry. 

"Bully," the sole right to impersonate "Happy Holligan" at Chapel exercises. 

Campbell, five gallons of water wrom the fountain of youth that he may drink 
thereof and renew his energy. 

Stark, the exclusive right to use the floor as a blackboard. 

Simon, a standing invitation to all dances, regardless of special invitations. 

In our great and earnest consideration for those who will attempt to fill our place, 
we give our bequeath : 

To the Juniors, our special uniforms and nerve enough to get them. Also a class 
team that can win a championship. 

To the Sophomores, that unity of class spirit which is sadly lacking to the Juniors. 
And nerve enough to take the punishment awarded by the Commandant and Faculty. 

To the Freshmen, a view of that new modernly equipped gymnasium which will 
be erected in 19 — . 

To the "Preps," a special rural high school to be provided by a Mississippi 
Legislature. 

Believing that the Mississippi Legislature of 191 2 should be rewarded for the 
services they have done this College in trying to cut out the "Prep" department, de- 
creasing appropriations at the expense of the young men of the state who are attempt- 
ing to get an education, and in other ways trying to remodel the state government to 
suit their own individual taste: and recognizing the ability of said body to economize 
and at the same time make each thankful for what he receives, we name the Missis- 
sippi Legislature of 19 12 as sole executors. 

Class 191 2 



""^I^^^S^lh^RE^BILL^ l©l&^^g^P^' 



Thinking of You 

Far from these studies, tired mind, 
Why art thou back- ward roaming? 
To smiling face and love so blind, 
And evenings lost in gloaming. 

Little knew I then it could not last, 
The harvest moon was gleaming, 
From present loves these thoughts fly past, 
O!! heaven, 'tis joy a dreaming. 

I wonder'd if you think of me, 
E'en on some lonely evening. 
Perhaps another sweetheart, she ; 
Could love to be so deceiving? 

I knew not then what 'twas to part, 
You sigh'd as I was leaving. 
In vain Fve searched for truer heart, 
None yet, I think believing. 

There in that night's departing whirl, 
Embrass'd in the moon-strewn path, 
Fare-well to you, my true loved pearl, 
This longing is after-math. 

N'Importe, '12. 



127 



^^^^IhB- REV^IIvIyB- 10 



Yearning 



I wonder why I yearn to-night, 
For one that's far away. 
It's not for my hearth-side bright, 
Though there I loved to stay. 

It's for a girl with auburn hair, 

And eyes of darkness brown. 

Her voice chimes sweet, her face is fair, 

Her brow knows not a frown. 

With all these qualities, and — love, 
Which doth her beauty crown; 
In manner gentle as a dove: 
To such all must bow down. 

I would that I could be to-night, 

With her, mine own ideal. 

Perhaps, a porch with moon-light bright, 

Then, to make things real. 

NTmporte, '12. 




128 




COL. MUSGRAVE 



129 




no 




131 




132 




133 




134 



!£>!£ 




Company "A" 

OFFICERS 

Rothe, C. Captain 

Thrower, T. B. . . . . . . . . First Lieutenant 

Armstrong, B. E First Sergeant 

SERGEANTS 
Best, K. H. McKie, IVL S. 

Dodd, R. E. Sullivan, O. D. 

Lucas, E. L. 

CORPORALS 
Cook, T. I. Pace, J- F. 

Pace, W. B. Smith, R. R. 

135 




u(> 



"* s ^^^^3>^REWBnL,LB* 1^12^^^^ 




Company "B" 

OFFICERS 
Wheat, W. E. .......... Captain 

Britt, J. M. . . . . . . . . First Lieutenant 

MlMS, W. C. ........ . Second Lieutenant 

Owens. W. A. ........ First Sergeant 

SERGEANTS 
Anderson, E. C. Hurdle, E. F. Overstreet, C. A. 

Boddie, G. Kirkpatrick, J. H. 

CORPORALS 
Bvnum, W. M. Moore, J. B. Thorson, K. W. 

Heard, J. M. Newman, J. L. Woodfin, A. E. 

137 




138 



^^^^The- Reveille* i^is^^^^^^ 




Patrick, J. A. 
Weldon, D. L. 
Riley, J. W. 



Scott, A. 



Bradford, P. S. 
Crawford, G. L. 

Miss Harris 



Company "C" 

OFFICERS 



SERGEANTS 
Harden, J. C. 

CORPORALS 
Biedenbaugh, M. M. 
Gaither, H. 



Captain 

Lieutenant 

First Lieutenant 



Thompson, C. C. 



Hinton, C. R. 

Thornton, S. 



Sponsor 



139 




J4-0 



~*^^gg^s T>*£- REVEILLE- 10 12^^^^^ 




v, ijn*r< 




ff/(A^ 




Company "D" 

OFFICERS 

Routten, J. R. Captain 

Terry, A. K. ........ First Lieutenant 

Chapman, R. E. ....... Second Lieutenant 

Roper, P. E First Sergeant 

SERGEANTS 
Harrison, L. O'Brien, C. W. 

Tovner, W. H. Williams, W. N. 

'Mitchell, F. 

CORPORALS 
Collins, J. J. Mclnnisj R. Rogers, L T. 

McBee, J. S. Lenoir, C. H. Tingle, J. T. 

141 




142 




143 




144 



1£>1& 




Company "E" 

OFFICERS 



Langston, J. M. 

ROBERDS. C. E. 

Stevenson, J. N. 



Captain 

First Lieutenant 

Second Lieutenant 



Brown, H. G. 
Coman, R. M. 

Alderman, W. 
Brooks, C. S. 
Goza, E. D. 



SERGEANTS 

Dunning, A. B. 
Tate, W. B. 

CORPORALS 
H. Griffing, S. D. 

McKay, H. M. 
McKewen, J. S. 



Miss Moore 



Sponsor 



145 




146 




Company "F" 

OFFICERS 

Journey, W. C Captain 

Stanford, H. C First Lieutenant 

Brewer, C. A Second Lieutenant 

NON-COMMISSIONKD OFFICERS 

McMurphy, H. H First Sergeant 

SERGEANTS 
Guerrv, N. D. Savle, S. F. Huff, S. P. 

Whitaker, F. H. Shelton, A. D. 

CORPORALS 
Fleming, B. J. Brumneld, C. W. Robbins, J. N. 

Fleming, R. L. Thweat, W. K. Crumpton, H. B. 

Cook, F. D. 
Miss Hartness Sponsor 

H7 




148 



—^^^^ThE- Reveille- \®\%^^s^a^" 




Thomae, E. 

WOMACK, M. S. 

Spinks, P. E. . 



MlXGEE, W. M. 



Company "G" 

OFFICERS 



SERGEANTS 
Tinsley, CM. McGehee, T. F. 

Harrison, B. Backstrom, J. F. 

CORPORALS 
Byrd, E. H. Lindley, W. C. 



Captain 

First Lieutenant 

Second Lieutenant 

First Sergeant 



H9 




ISO 



^i^^^lhe- Reveille- 1012^^^^ 




Company "H" 

OFFICERS 
Beanland, W. C. ......... . Captain 

McKlNNON, M. M. . . . . . . First Lieutenant 

Cunningham, H. ....... . Second Lieutenant 

Henkle, J. O. . . . . . . . . . Private Senior 

Robers, K. S. . . . . . . . . . . First Sergeant 

SERGEANTS 
Dove, W. E. Sharbrough, \V. C. 

Wingfield, F. G. McKinnie, D. 

CORPORALS 
Adams, W. W. O'Neal, J. R. 

Knight, J. R. Kinney, H. C. 

McClure, J. C. Carpenter, S. D. 

151 




152 




153 




154 



^^^^^^Ih^RE^^iui,^ l^i&^^^^r^ 




Greaves, J. M. 
Barrett, C. P. 
Herbert, S. A. 
Nash, H. E. . 



Company "I" 

OFFICERS 



SERGEANTS 
Sargent, E. F. B. English, M. L. 

Whitaker, J. D. Howard, L. H. 

CORPORALS 
Arnold, W. A. Sanders, P. H. 

Olson, L. A. White, E. F. 



Captain 

First Lieutenant 

Second Lieutenant 

First Sergeant 



Rhodes, A. L. 
Allen, J. L. 



155 




156 



^^^§^T>iE- Reveille- img^^§^^ 




West. J. T. . 
Carpenter. J. W. . 
Jones, J. B. 
Mingee, G. C. 

CritZj A. 
Conaway, J. E. 

Ames, W .P. 
Busby, R. E. 

Miss Gray 



Company "K' 

OFFICERS 



SERGEANTS 
Miller, M. E. 
Bowen, W. R. 

CORPORALS 
Watson, J. G. 
Cockerham, K. L. 



Captain 

First Lieutenant 

Second Lieutenant 

First Sergeant 



French, H. O. 
Graham, F. C. 

Grimes, D. W. 
Sponsor 



157 




158 



-^^ggsg&JE^ Reveille- i&ib^^^s^^ 




Company "L" 

OFFICERS 

Allen, A. H Captain 

Child, E First Lieutenant 

ALLEN , J. B. . . . . . . . . Second Lieutenant 

Houston, A. F. Third Lieutenant 

Mingee, E. W. . . . . . . . . . First Sergeant 

SERGEANTS 
McDonald, W. M. Sides, L. M. Smith, C. A. 

York, C. V. Rainey, H. Jourdan, F. L. 

CORPORALS 
McCarty, J. C. Darnell, A. F. Frederick, I. C. 

White, R. P. Kyle, H. A. Pou, P. W. 

Toomer, T. 

159 




i6o 



""^^SfeJfaE- RBV-BILLEh 1® 12^^^-" 




Casanova, T. H. 
Jones, E. 
Keeton, W. M. 
Prosser, J. L. . 



Company "M" 

OFFICERS 



Spinks, A. G. 
Scott, J. W. 
Dent, W. W. 



SERGEANTS 



Lipe, R. E. 
Mason, D. M. 



CORPORALS 

West, J. D. Willis, L. A. 

Smith, M. E. Livingston, J. M. 



Captain 

First Lieutenant 

Second Lieutenant 

First Sergeant 




1 62 



-* s ^^^^J>\£*REVraLIyB* 1^1^^§^^ 




Treen, C 
Harrison, 


W 
L 




J. 


c. 


Hardy Volunteers 

OFFICERS 






First 


Captain 
Sergeant 










Neil 


son, 


SERGEANTS 
H. H. 


Solomon, 


II 












Peterson, 


J. B. 






CORPORALS 
Smith, C. B. 






Ad< 


■rhnlt 


T 


. S. 



163 




Professor Carl Leake ......... Director 

B. L. Field .......... Captain 

J. C. Stoy .......... First Lieutenant 

J. V. Lobdell ........ Second Lieutenant 

R. A. Brading . . . . . . ■ • Principal Musician 

A. D. Chalk ......... Drum Major 

SERGEANTS 
Bethea, R. O. Middleton, W. G. 

CORPORALS 
Cole, J. H. Stansel, H. S. Mason, J. G. 

INSTRUMENTATION 

C. D. White Oboe S. C. McNiel . . . Third Cornet 

L. J. Netto Piccolo D. W. Love First Horn 

J. P. McNiel . . . Solo Clarinet O. J. Miller .... Second Horn 

J. V. Lobdell . . . Second Clarinet E. S. Barrentine Alto 

E. M. McPherson . Second Clairnet S„ B. Chambers Alto 

C. H. Hey .... Third Clarinet J. T. Allen Alto 

W. R. Lominich . . Third Clarinet J. C. Stoy .... Solo Trombone 

C. C. Grisham . . Third Clarinet W. W. Golden . . First Trombone 

C. K. Underwood . . Third Clarinet C. E. Whittington . Second Trombone 

T. W. Fagg . . . Third Clarinet C. H. Blanton . . Second Trombone 

J. G. Mason . . . E Flat Clarinet J. W. Crane . . Third Trombone 

R. O. Bethea . . . Alto Saxophone H. H. Fuller . . Third Trombone 

M. R. Dasher . . Tenor Saxophone W. W. Pierce . . Third Trombone 

H. M. Waddell . Baritone Saxophone B. Steinberg Baritone 

L E. Cox .... Third Clarinet T. W. Bailey Tuba 

B. L. Field Solo Cornet E. H. Smith Tuba 

R. A. Brading .... Solo Cornet H. S. Stansel . . . BB Flat Bass 

W. H. Rowan .... First Cornet J. H. Cole Snare Drum 

E. A. Jones .... Second Cornet N. F. Ruffin .... Bass Drum 

J. N. Roberts . . . Third Cornet A. F. McGeehee .... Cymbals 



FIELD MUSIC 



S. W. Rhodes 

B. L. Field Bugle 

J. C. Stoy Bugle 

R. A. Brading Bugle 

W. G. Middleton .... Bugle 

W. Brogan Biu>le 

O. J. Miller Bugle 



Trumpeter-in-Charge 

A. B. McHenry Bugle 

J. G. Bethea Bugle 

J. P. McNiel .... Snare Drum 

J. H. Cole Snare Drum 

S. B. Chambers . . . Bass Drum 



164 




i65 




1 66 




167 



^-^aegSfcsJ}"^ Re^e-illb* imz^gFsg&pr*- 



Members of the Mississippi Sabre Company 



Allen, A. H. 
Allen, J. F. 
Baird, C. O. 
Barrett, C. P. 
Beanland, W. C. 
Bergman, J. E. 
Brewer, C. A. 
Carpenter, J. W. 
Casanova, T. H. 
Child, E. 
Crumpton, J. R. 
Cunningham, H. 
Ellard, J. A. 
Field, B. L. 
Greaves, J. M. 
Gulledge, E. P. 
Harper, H. G. 
Herrinyton, G. L. 



Journey, W. C. 
Keeton, W. M. 
McNeil, J. P. 
Randall, C. C. 
Rhodes, S. W. 
Roberds, C. E. 
Rothe, C. 
Routten, J. R. 
Smith, M. D. 
Stanford, H. C. 
Stoy, J. C. 
Thomae, E. 
Thormu, F. D. 
Vafnado, H. R. 
Wade, E. G. 
West, J. T. 
Wheat, W. E. 






168 




IC9 




170 




i7i 



^^g^s^B^ REWBIIX2B* 1^1^^^^^^ 



Miss Critz 

Miss Carpenter 
Miss James . 



George Rifles 

COLORS 

Red and Blue 



Sponsor 
Maid 
Maid 



OFFICERS 



Smith, M. D. . 
Rhodes, S. W. 
Field, B. L. 
Bratton, J. H. 
Armstrong, B. E, 
Gentsch, H. S. . 
Rhodes, A. L. 



Captain 

First Lieutenant 

Second Lieutenant 

First Sergeant 

Second Sergeant 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Color Sergeant 



Brading, R. A. 
Crumpton, J. R. 
Hall, D. S. 
Herbert, S. A. 
Henkel, J. O. 
Hogan, J. B. 
Jennings, M. 
Lipe, R. E. 
Martin, L. A. 
McMurphy, H. H. 



ROLL 

McDermott, R. J. 
Olson, L. A. 
Oneal, J. R. 
Powers, H. T. 
Price, F. R. 
Shaifer, C. W. 
Smith, C. B. 
Stoy, J. C. 
Tisdale, O. R. 
Thomae, E. 



172 




Ct\>>T COBa/RO . Mlb!>ALLlE INSOJf 

F/rst Lieu J PM c Niel MissLurune Puller 

Sec. L'eu. J.N. Stevenson Miss Lelia Henry 



•73 



^^^^^^ThE^R^V^BILvIv^ i£>ig^ 



The Lee Guard 

COLORS 

Old Gold and Purple 

Reeves, Miss Allie ......... Sponsor 

Puller, Miss Lurline ......... Maid 

Henry, Miss Lelia ......... Maid 

OFFICERS 

Baird, CO............ Captain 

McNiel, J. P. . • • . . . . First Lieutenant 

Stevenson, J. N. ....... . Second Lieutenant 

Dupree, S. F. . . . . . . . . . . First Sergeant 

English, M. L. . . . . . . . . Second Sergeant 

Cook, A. B. . . . . . . . . . . Third Sergeant 

McClure, J. C. . . . . . . . . Color Bearer 

Coleman, S. A. . . . . . . . Secretary and Treasurer 



ROLL 



Bergman, J. E. 
Brogan, W. 
Clardy, W. J. 
Conaway, J. E. 
Cunningham, H. 
Dunning, A. B. 
El lard, J. A. 
Gardner, F. W. 
Gilleland, G. T. 
G reave:,, J. M. 



Harrison, B. 
Harrison, L. 
Kinney, C. P. 
Prosser, J. L. 
Joiner, V. H. 
Roberds, C. E. 
Rogers, J. T. 
Randall, C. C. 
Wingfield, F. G. 



174 




175 



1£>12 



Special Military Companies 



Our special military companies have the same signigcance to us as the Greek 
letter fraternities have to the college that have them. The state has seen fit to debar 
"frats" at this institution, and, induced by the laws of human nature, — to have some 
social function wherever we go — there has been organized in the student body three 
special military companies, viz: — The Sabre Company, Lee Guard, and George Rifles. 

The Sabre Company is composed of members of the Senior Class only, and the 
drill is with the saber. 

The Lee Guard and George Rifles are composed of members of the student body 
who have been connected with the school for one year, and who have qualities to suit 
the demand of these organizations. Their drills is with the rifle and consists chiefly 
of "fancy stunts.' 

Thus the purpose of these companies is more than to create a social organization, 
for while each has its social functions, including the annual ball for each, there is a 
great benefit to be derived from the short drills, to which the members are glad to give 
a little of their spare time each day. 

These organizations, under the proper management, are a source of benefit to 
the members as well as a credit to the college, and should hold the esteem of both the 
faculty and student body. 




176 



101& 



The Last Run of Tom Calhoun 

"Now, my boy," said Dr. Covington, turning to Tom Calhoun, the engineer on 
the "Dixie Flyer," "You have one chance in fifty of reaching St. Louis in time to save 
this young lady's life, and I believe you have the grit and nerve to do it." Tom 
reached over and threw two switches and the big gyroscope wheels began to revolve, 
for the "Dixie Flyer" was a monorail train and a fast one, at that. 

"Well, 'Doc,' " he said, as they shook hands, "I'll do my best, but be sure and 
have a clear track for me." 

Again Tom threw a switch, and the ponderous train slid easily from between its 
supports and sped away on the fastest run of its career. Calhoun was a fine, manly 
fellow of about twenty-three. But, although young in years, he was old in experience. 
He came from a fine old Southern family, but soon after he had finished his college 
education, his parents died, leaving him to support his two younger sisters. As soon 
as he had settled up the estate, which to tell the truth, was not very large, he went 
north and secured a position in the electrical department of the St. Louis and 
Southern, a monorail line. From this point he had gradually worked up to the posi- 
tion of engineer of the "Dixie Flyer," the pride of the line. Since this position paid a 
good salary, Tom was able to live comfortably and dress nicely, as well as support his 
sisters. But, although they were a great draw back to him, he loved them none the 
less for it, as he realized that it was not their fault and that it was his business to care 
for them. 

As the monorail gathered speed, Tom's thoughts turned to Esther Wade, his 
lone passenger. Esther was the daughter of Howard Wade, the president of the road, 
and he was also a mighty steel magnate. 

"I know," soliloquized Tom, "that I love Esther better than anything on earth 
and I believe she cares for me, but old Wade has drawn the line on engineers. The 
last engineer of this old trolly car was a sentimental young cuss, and tried to get fresh 
with Esther. So as long as yours truly is an engineer, there's nothing doing in the 
marrying line." 

Tom's soliloquy was broken off by a sharp report from one of the motors that 
drive the big gyroscopic wheels. In an instant Tom was bending over the motor, 
searching, with a practical idea, for the brake. Slowly and almost imperceptable, one 
of the big wheels began to slacken its pace and the car began to lean to one side. In 
his excitement, Tom went over the motor twice before he discovered the trouble. He 
was so excited that he had overlooked the big carbon brushes, and he now found one 
of these broken off within the holder. With a frantic effort, Tom forced the carbon 
and holder so as to touch the contract point, the commutator. Quickly he ran to the 
other end of the car to get a fresh carbon from his supply box, but to his dismay, he 
found it empty — the careless assistant had forgotten to fill the box. Now Tom began 
to tremble all over and the cold sweat broke out all over his face. The monorail was 
leaning more and would soon loose its balance and Tom knew what would happen. 
He looked ahead with the hope of seeing one of the big supports which are placed at 
intervals along the track, in case of an accident that would disable the gyroscopes. 
Realizing that no help was to come from that quarter, he braced himself for the crash. 
But instead of a crash there came a sharp noise as if a hard substance had fallen and 
struck the floor. Tom merely glanced in the direction of the sound, but that glance 
brought him to life. With difficulty he crawled along the sloping floor, passed the 
open door of the car and seized the object which had fallen to the floor — it was an 

177 



191& 



old dusty but perfectly good carbon. It had been laid across a rafter in the ceiling, 
and owing to the slant of the car, had slipped from its support. It required the work 
of an instant to adjust the carbon, and the disabled gyroscope began to revolve with 
renewed energy. Tom was by no means a saint, but he had no sooner fixed the 
carbon, than he got down upon his knees and thanked God for his Esther's deliverance. 

Tom now put his whole soul into the race and two hours later the "Dixie Flyer - ' 
pulled into St. Louis. Thirty-two minutes ahead of the fastest record. Esther was 
hurried to a sanatorium. Tom went home to try to collect his almost shattered nerves. 
Twice that evening he sent to the sanatorium to find out about Esther's condition, but 
both times he got unsatisfactory reports. 

The next morning, when he awoke, Tom found a note from President Wade, re- 
questing his presence at the president's office. When he was admitted, he was sur- 
prised to find the Vice-President and board of directors seated around a large table. 

"Now, Mr. Calhoun," said the president, "You will please tell us the incidents 
of your trip and how you managed to break the records set by your rival road, the 
N. O. & E." Tom faithfully related the details and laid great stress upon the lucky 
fall of the carbon, and was modest enough to only touch lightly upon the latter part 
of the run. When he had finished, the President rose and said: "Gentlemen, you 
know what Mr. Calhoun has done for the road and now I will tell you what he did 
tor me. When the 'Flyer' left Memphis I received a message from Dr. Covington, 
who is a personal friend of mine, which reads as follows:" 

" 'Dear Wade, have just put your daughter on 'Dixie Flyer.' Believe Calhoun 
will make it.' Well, gentlemen, he did make it, and my daughter is now doing nicely. 
I move that we make Mr. Calhoun the manager of our electrical department, and I 
hope you will see fit to act on this motion." 

The motion was voted on and defeated by one vote. When the meeting was over, 
Tom turned with a sad heart, not so much because his promotion had failed, but be- 
cause he was still an engineer, and, as such, he could not hope to win Esther. As he 
turned to go, he felt a hand laid on his shoulder. 

"My boy," said the deep voice of Mr. Wade, "I regret the failure of that motion 
more than you do, for I not only wanted you in the plant, but I also wanted that fellow 
Taylor out. Now, boy," and the deep voice quivered a little as he spoke, "I can never 
thank you for what you have done for me, but my daughter who is now entirely out 
of danger wishes to thank you for both of us." Tom flushed with pleasure at this un- 
expected opportunity to see Esther, and as he started for the sanatorium, he heard 
Wade call, "By the way, Tom, I forgot to tell you that I have withdrawn my decree 
against engineers." 

And Tom bound down the steps, feeling ten years younger. 

H. M. W., '14. 




178 




179 




i8o 



FOOTBALL 




181 




1A6&UDCR. 



1 82 




1 83 




1 84 




Looking back over the past Football Season, we have just cause to be proud of 
the team which wore the Maroo.i and White. Too much praise cannot be given to 
our coaching staff and players who, in spite of all discouragement and hard luck, in 
form of sickness and injuries of the members of the team, made the season the most 
successful in the history of the College. At the beginning of the season the defeat we 
had suffered the year before was still in the mi:d of everyone, and the energy of the 
coaches, as well as that of the players, was utilized to develop a team that would be 
able to defeat our old rivals, Mississippi University. 

We had the good fortune to have most of the old team back, Williams, Jennings, 
Allen, Rhodes, Ellard, Cole, and Mills formed the nucleus, from which, with the 
addition of Kimball, Magee, Wells, and Cooper, the coaches developed a fighting 
machine which held its own against any of its opponent;. 

It is true, victory not every time Lodged in our camp. Auburn a:d Tulane de- 
feated us, but both times the causes of our defeat can be traced back to conditions 
which were beyond the control of the coaches or players, each time some of the regulars 
were substituted by subs on account of sickness. 

We opened the sea;on by playing Mississippi College. The victory was an easy 
one for us, but the game brought out the fact that our team was on the road to suc- 
cess. A week later we defeated S. P. U. and, on the 20th of October, the entire stu- 
dent body went to Columbus to see, in company of the I. I. & C. girl-, our team play 



Alabama. This was the first real football game of the season, and although in some 
respects the game was a disappointment, it gave the team a chance to discover faults 
and defects, and study out remedies for the future. 

The next game was against Auburn in Birmingham. In this game the team 
proved that they could play ball. After having been defeated in the first few minutes 
of the game, our men pulled together, and not only held their own against their heavy- 
opponents, but also for the first time in our football history an A. & M. player crossed 
Auburn's goal line for a touchdown. 

After Auburn, we played L. S. U. at Gulfport. The Louisiana Tigers went into 
the game with the grim determination to take revenge for a past defeat. But A. & M. 
proved to be too much for the Tigers' strength. We defeated them in a very hard 
fought game, in which Williams, Ellard, and Mills sustained injuries which pre- 
vented their taking part in the game against Tulane, which, in consequence of the 
crippled condition of our team, defeated us. 

However, by the time the last game of the season was to be played, all players 
were in excellent condition. They left for Jackson in high spirits, and the result of 
the game showed that our confidence was not misplaced. We beat University of 
Mississippi by a score of 6 to o, and won the championship of the state. 



Football Scores 

September 29 Mississippi College .... 6 

October 7 S. P. U o 

October 14 Howard O 

October 20 Alabama 6 

October 27 Auburn 11 

November 3 Birmingham College .... o 

November 11 L. S. U o 

November 20 Tulane 6 

November 30 University of Mississippi . . o 



A. & M 27 

A. & M 30 

A. & M 48 

A. & M 6 

A. & M 5 

A. & M 62 

A. & M 6 

A. & M 4 

A. & M 6 




186 




BASE* BALL 




187 



-^^gg^Sss^ThE- Rb^billb* lQi&^^^a^*" 




BASE BALL 




19 12 

March 25, 2b, 27 . . . Millsaps Jackson 

March 29, 30 ... . University of Georgia Campus 

April 4, 5, 6 University of Alabama Campus 

April 8, 9, 10 . . . . Auburn Auburn 

April 11, 12, 13 . . . Mercer Macon 

April 18, 19, 20 . . . L. S. U Campus 

April 25, 2b, 27 . . . Mississippi College Campus 

May 2, 3, 4 S. P. U Campus 

May 6, 7 University of Mississippi Oxford 

May 8 University of Mississippi Meridian 



Mississippi A. & M. 



Base Ball Schedule '11 








5 


Mississippi College 


2 


Clinton 


March 


27 


2 


" " 


I 


" 


u 


28 


2 


(< n 


5 


" 


" 


30 


^ 


Alabama Polytechnic 


5 


Campus 


April 


3 


6 


U a 


o 




" 


3 


i 


(1 14 


2 


tl 


" 


5 


s 


Tulane University 


4 


New Orleans 


" 


10 


2 


Millsaps College . 




I 


Jackson 


" 


12 


I 


University Alabama 




6 


Tuscaloosa 


" 


13 


3 


ii it 




4 


" 


" 


14 


4 






i 






15 


6 


Mississippi College 




2 


Campus 




19 


5 


" " 




O 


" 


" 


20 


4 


" " 




3 




" 


21 


i 


Louisiana State 




o 


Campus 


" 


28 


i 


" " 




2 






29 


5 


" " 




I 


" 




29 


2 


Cumberland University 


O 


Campus 


May 


4 


3 




I 






5 


3 


u 


2 






5 


o 


University of Mississipp 


3 


Campus 




9 


7 


" " 


2 


" 


" 


10 


3 


" " 




2 


Gulfport 


May 


12 



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-"^sggJS^Thi^ Revbillb* i©i&,^^a^^ 



BASE BALL 

The Baseball Season of 191 1 was something that will always go down in the 
annals of this College, for it was during this year that we really branched out and 
played some of the leading Colleges of the South. 

The season opened with three games with Auburn, and although the series went 
to Auburn, our team showed strength, and gave promise for success in future games. 

We next played Mississippi College in Jackson. We lost one game, won one, 
and forfeited the last one in the eighth inning with a score of two to nothing in our 
favor. After these games our team returned home for good hard practice in prepara- 
tion for a trip to New Orleans, Jackson, and Tuscaloosa where Tulane, Millsaps, and 
University of Alabama were played. The trip was a successful one, A. & M. winning 
the series from Tulane and Millsaps, but losing to U. of A., two games out of three. 

The next games were with Mississippi College on the Campus. A. & M. made 
a clean sweep of the series. It was in these games that A. & M. showed Mississippi 
College that their dreams of State — or probably Southern Championship — were pipe 
dreams. 

Next came L. S. U. to cross bats with A. & M. This being the last series 
L. S. U. had to play, they were determined to take it, but they fell before A. & M. 
just as Mississippi College had done. The next victims of our team were the repre- 
sentatives of Cumberland. They came with the same dreams and expectation the 
other teams had done, and returned under the same conditions, — beaten. 

Now we were prepared for our last series, the one upon which the success or 
failure of our entire season depended. It was with our old rival, U. of M. The first 
two games were played on Hardy Field, and the last one at Gulfport. The red 
and blue came over with their spirits high, expecting to "mop up" with us, but we 
were determined to have revenge for the treatment we received from their hands the 
previous Thanksgiving Day at Jackson, so A. & M. ended this eventful season by 
dropping only one of the games to U. of M., thereby winning the championship of the 
state for the year, igio-'n. 



190 



igi 



-*-^^^^^lhE-REVBILD^ img^sggg^ 



B AS K ET BALL 

The Basketball Season of ign-'i2 will long be remembered by the supporters 
and the believers in the Maroon and White, for it was in this season that our team 
defeated every team it met. 

We began our record breaking season by defeating Mississippi College in two games 
on the Campus. These games were well played and very exciting. The next team 
to arrive on the Campus was Union University, but they were easily beaten both 
games. 

The last two of the home games were a splendid exhibition of basketball. These 
games were played with L. S. U. The Louisiana Tigers had beaten University of 
Mississippi in two games, so they thought we would be "Easy Money," but in both of 
the games we were victorious. The winning of these games put us ahead of U. of M. 
for the championship of the state. 

After the games with L. S. U., A. & M. went on the road for three games, or.e 
with Millsaps at Jackson, and two with Mississippi College at Clinton. As we were 
victorious in those games, we are the undisputed champions of Mississippi. 



Basket Ball Scores, 1912 



January 


25 


A. 


& M. 






45 


January 


26 


A. 


& M. 






30 


February 


1 


A. 


& M. 






66 


February 


2 


A. 


& M. 






36 


February 


6 


A. 


& M. 






22 


February 


7 


A. 


& M. 






21 


February 


12 


A. 


& M. 






22 


February 


14 


A. 


& M. 






25 


February 


15 


A. 


& M. 






21 



Mississippi College 17 

Mississippi College 20 

Union University 18 

Union University 13 

L. S. U 16 

L. S. U 13 

Millsaps 6 

Mississippi College 17 

Mississippi College 13 



Total 



A. k M. 



288 



Opp. 



i33 




BASKETBALL TEAM 



193 



1£>12 




TENNIS CLUB 



Whitaker, F. H. 
Granberry, C. E. 
Pearson, C. W. 



Tennis Club 

OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



Bolton, W. T. 
Bolton, J. L. 
Chinn, T. G. 
Cox, J. E. 
Caldwell, H. M. 
Evans, T. S. 
Harden, J. C. 
H amnions, C. R. 
Hulett, A. W. 
Lyons, J. D. 
McCrlla, J. B. 
McKinnie, I. 



MEMBERS 

McElroy, J. H. 
McPherson, E. M. 
Matthrews, R. E. 
Roseborough, W. 
Roseborough, J. L. 
Sherman, H. S. 
Smith, C. A. 
Thorsen, K. W. 
Waddell, H. M. 
Wingneld, F. G. 
Whitaker, J. D. 



194 




195 



1912 



TRACK ATHLETICS 

The Annual Intercollegiate Field Day was held May 13, 191 1, at Gulfport, 
Miss., and our team gained the honor of being the champions of the state. 

A. & M. made more points then the other three colleges (Millsaps, U. of M., 
and Mississippi College) put together. Namely, 64 out of possible 120. A. & M. 
won first and second place in several events, and only in pole vault we did not w T in a 
place. Our relay team gained the honor of breaking the Southern record at this meet. 



RECORDS 

First Second 

Low Hurdles Williams Jennings 

High Hurdles ....Jennings 

One Mile Fletcher McCluer 

Two Mile McCluer 

440 Yard Run Rhodes 

220 Yard Run ....Wells Venerable 
100 Yard Dash . . . 

Shot Put Rhodes 

Discus Throw Jennings 

Hammer Throw . . Lamb 

Broad Jump Smith 

Relay Run — Wells, Parker, Rhodes, Gaston. 



Third 



Magill 
Venerable 



196 




TRACK TEAM 



197 



-^^j^^ThE^RE^E-ILLE- l^ia^ssgagr-^ 



CLASS FOOTBALL 

CLASS football at A. & M. has always been famous for its keen rivalry, hard 
fought games, and manly sportsmanship. Seldom in its history has a team 
scored more than one touchdown over an opponent, and often the two 
strongest teams have battled each Saturday almost into the baseball season, 
only to have the matter decided by a streak of luck, or the flipping of a coin. This 
season the rivalry has been as keen as ever, but the victories have been more decisive. 

This year a famous tradition of eleven years standing has been dispelled and 
scattered to the four winds of Oktibbeha County. As far back as history, Elder, and 
"Billy" diary can remember the Junior Class always won the championship, but the 
Junior Class of '13 failed to uphold the tradition. It has been a seasonal surprise and 
sad tragedy of the four to one bet. 

Class football has done a great deal for " 'Varsity". Such wearers of the "M ' 
as "Head" Ellard, Bob Gilleland, "Pewee" Mills, "Cub" Allen, and many other 
noble players got their start in football. In the first game of the season, the husky 
Juniors rightly expected to win from the recruited Senior team, but this dream was 
dispelled by the first work of "Squire" Jones, and the miniature wandering Jew, — the 
Senior quarterback, and transformed into a 0-0 tie. The work of the Junior captain 
and of several other members of each team, showed ability. The Junior team should 
have won the game, as it was composed of heavier and more experienced men, but that 
very necessary quality, known as team work, was missing. Later the Seniors with- 
drew from the race, as their desire for glory was satisfied by their performance of a 
year ago. 

The Freshman-Sophomore game was the most astonishing of all, in this game the 
over confident Freshmen were swept off their feet by the fast Sophomores back field. 
They gave the best exhibit of speed ever witnessed here in a class game. They worked 
the onside-kick and forward pass successfully. 

The championship game after innumerable postponements was finally played off 
on one balmy afternoon in February. Both teams had valuable men out of the game, 
but the recruits went into the game to "pay" for it. It was almost an exact reproduc- 
tion of the Freshman-Sophomore game. The Sophs scored both their touchdowns in 
the first quarter, just as in the previous game, after that the game was hard fought, 
with honors almost even. 

Far into the dead hours of that historical Saturday night, the witches came from 
the dark blue cedar trees and the murmuring haunts of the hills, and with their 
legendary steeds of cobweb ruhses and white wash they did the brazen deed. Old 
Sol disclosed the waking campus in huge letters on "the Tank," the story of the game. 




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203 



The Singer's Climax 

"If you want to hear 'Annie Laurie' sung, come to my room, No. 513, tonight,"' 
said a Senior to his classmate. "We have a lovelorn fellow in our midst who has 
been sadly wrecked recently by the refusal of a young girl to whom he has been pay- 
ing attention for more than a year. It is seldom he will sing ; but when he does, it is 
enough to draw tears from one unused to weeping." 

The noisy party assembled on time at the appointed place, and were gayly 
chatting and laughing, when a tall cadet, whose peculiar face and air instantly 
arrested attention, entered the room. He was very pale, with that clear, vivid com- 
plexion, which dark-haired consumptives so often have; his locks were black as jet, 
and hung profusely upon his square shoulders ; his eyes were very large and spiritual, 
and his brow was such as a poet might have. One or two thoughtless lads laughed 
as they whispered that he was "love-cracked," but the rest of the boys treated him 
with respectful deference. 

It was rather late in the evening when singing was proposed, and to ask him to 
sing "Annie Laurie" was a task of uncommon delicacy. One song after another was 
sung, and at last that one was named. At its mention, the young, slick-faced cadet, 
who was now the center of attention, grew deathly pale, but he did not speak; he 
seemed instantly to be lost in reverie. 

"The name of the girl who treated him so badly was Annie Laurie,' " said 
naughty Tom, whispering to his spellbound colleagues. "But oh! I wish he would 
sing it; nobody else can do it justice." 

No one dares to sing Annie Laurie' before you, Jack," said elderly Sherbrum. 
"Would it be too much for me to ask you to favor the boys with it?" he asked timidly. 

He did not reply for a moment, but his lips quivered ; and, then, looking up as 
if he saw a spiritual presence, he began. Every soul was hushed, — it seemed as if 
his voice was the voice of an angel. The tones seemed to vibrate through every nerve, 
pulse, and heart, and made one shiver with the pathos of his feeling. Never was 
heard melody like that, in a human voice, — so plaintive, so soulful, so tender and 
earnest. 

He sat with his head thrown back, his eyes half closed ; his locks of hair glisten- 
ing about his pale temples; his fine throat swelling with the rich tones, his hands 
lightly folded before him. And as he sung, 

"And 'twas there that Annie Laurie 
Gave me her promise true," 
lie shook from head to foot with emotion. Many a lip trembled ; and there was no 
jesting, no laughing, but instead, tears were in more than one eye. 

And on he sang, and on, holding every one in rapt attention through the last 
verse, "Like dew on the gowan lying 

Is far fa' of her fairy feet, 
And like the winds in summer sighing 
Her voice is low and sweet, 
Her voice is low and sweet, 
And she's a' the world to me." 
He paused before he added, 

"And for Annie Laurie 
I'd lay me down and dee." 

There was a long and solemn pause. The black locks seemed to grow blacker ; 
the white temples whiter, almost imperceptibly the head kept falling; the eyes close 
shut. One boy glanced at another; all seemed awe stricken, 'till the same person who 
had urged him to sing laved his hand gently on his shoulder, saying: 

"Jack! Jack!" 

Then came a hush — a thrill of horrow crept through every frame — the poor, 
tired heart had ceased to beat. Jack, the love-betrayed, was dead. Easy, '12. 

204 



Organizations 







205 



^S^ggSfe^^RB^BILLB* IQlA^gSsa^^ 



The Honor System 

The A. & M. student body, during the latter part of the session of igio-'ll, 
accomplished, in the face of a great many besetting difficulties, a thing which shall ever 
stand as a perpetual monument to its integrity of Power and Purpose, — the Honor 
System. 

Mr. Lindley, our efficient Y. M. C. A. secretary of last year, had agitated this 
movement throughout his connection with the college, and with the co-operation of a 
few earnest-minded students, he succeeded in getting here Dr. W. D. Weatherford, the 
Genertal Student Secretary of the south, to help in the agitation and establishment of 
this movement. Dr. Weatherford came, and with him the vitality of deep-seated and 
powerful conviction of right, which swept everything before him in his plain, business- 
like and masterful appeals to the students. He presented and urged upon them the 
necessity of an Honor System in any college. A vote on the question was taken by 
the classes, the Senior class of that year taking the initiative. It was unanimously 
carried and adopted by each of the five classes. 

Under this system the students are placed upon their honor to do the right thing 
in all things. Though its mission, primarily, includes only the prevention of cheating 
on examinations, recitations and written tests, it is also believed that when firmly- 
rooted, the other evils that mingle within the midst of our college life will be eradi- 
cated. 

The Honor System is controlled by a council committee which consists of five 
members, two from the Senior class, one of which is the chairman, and one each 
from the Junior, Sophomore, and Freshman classes. The committee this session is 
composed of F. D. Thomas, Chairman, J. M. Langston, P. E. Roper, G. L. Craw- 
ford, and H. F. Causey. 

It is the duty of the council to investigate and pass judgment upon all cases re- 
ported to them. Any Cadet, regardless of class, who is found guilty by the council 
will be asked to withdraw from college, with the privilege of appealing to the faculty 
if the Cadet thinks that he lias not received justice. If a Cadet refuses to comply 
with the request of the council he will be dismissed by the faculty. 

Some have argued that the system conflicts with military discipline, but this has 
been proven fallacious. By their own free will, the students have accepted it, and the 
claim that the harm that the Honor System works when the power of the system is 
lost through negligence, is without justification. The system has worked ever since 
its establishment, and has continued to receive the support of every class in college, as 
well as the faculty. 

Each student is on his honor to see that no one cheats within his ob:ervations, 
though he is not required to act as a spy, but to report any case that he may chance to 
see. 

A new era has dawned, and in it we see a brighter, happier and more honest 
future for the intellectual ability of the students of the A. & M. College. 



2of> 



Y. M. C. A. 



Fitzgerald, R. H. . 

Varnado, H. R President 

Mercier, D. \ "ice-President 
Patrick, J. A Treasurer 

Harned, H. H./ 

Thomas, F. D. \ " ' 



Secretaries 



Pope, E. W Membership 

Journey, \V. C Bible 



OFFICERS 

General Secretary 

Langston, J. M Missions 

Houston, A. F Devotion 

Patrick, J. A Finance 

Routtex, J. R Social 

Stoy, J. C Handbook 

Wheat, W. E. . . Reading room 
Livingston. J. S. . . . Extension 



ADVISORY BOARD 

Herbert, Prof. J. C. Moore, Sec. A. J. 

Logan, Prof. W. N. Fitzgerald, R. H. 

Garner, Prof. P. P. Varnado, H. R. 

Davis, Lib. T. W. Mercier, D. 



In many respects, our I . M. C. A. holds quite an enviable place among the col- 
lege associations of the South. It is true that the percentage of students enrolled as 
members of the association and as members of Bible and Mission study classes may 
not be as high as that of some other colleges, but when the number of students in 
attendance here, and the difficulty in reaching each one of them individually, is con- 
sidered it must be conceded that we have a fairly strong association. 

There is no doubt but that the Y. M. C. A. has been a great factor for good 
here. This is especially true of our bi-weekly prayer meetings. It seems that in these 
prayer meetings, more than any where else, we have gotten closer to God, and that 
He is more real to us. We have always had good attendance at these meetings and we 
believe that it is due to the lack of all formality and cant, and to a feeling of the 
Divine Presence of God. Surely, there is nothing like prayer if we would actually 
commune with God. 

We have not had an evangelical campaign this year because of many unavoidable 
reasons, but hope to hold a real live one next session. While we haven't had this 
evangelical campaign, we have enjoyed very much listening to several good addresses, 
and I am sure that we are all the better because of having heard them. 

We do hope and pray that the Y. M. C. A. will continue to grow from year to 
year in its power to influence the lives of the^e in attendance here for the good, and to 
draw men and bovs closer to CHRIST. 



207 



1£>12 



Members of the Dialectic Literary Society 
for the Session 1911-1912 



Anthony, J. C. 
Alderman, W. H. 
Backstrom, J. F. 
Beacham, C. E. 
Bending, H. 
Bozeman, T. L. 
Boyd, H. L. 
Brewer, C. A. 
Brumrkld, C. W. 
Bullock, C. T. 
Burnes, J. B. 
Byrd, E. H. 
Clay, W. S. 
Clark, T. C. 
Carraway, J. O. 
Casanova, T. H. 
Cook, F. D. 
Courts, Miss Grace 
Cockerham, K. L. 
Denton, C. L. 
Dent, W. W . 
Dickey, R. M. 
Dove, W. E. 
French H. O. 
French, C. O. 
Gammill, J. W. 
Guerry, N. D. 
Guice, J. G. 
Houston, A. F. 
Hickman, A. E. 
Hurdle, E. F. 
Hullet, A. F. 
Hullet, A. W. 
Jacobs, R. D. 
McAmir, J. C. 



Mercier, D. 
Moody, C. S. 
Pace, J. F. 
Pace, W. B. 
Parker, W. D. 
Patterson, T. M. 
Peters, C. G. 
Pentacost, E. L. 
Prisock, N. 
Priddy, E. H. 
Powell, Mrs. P. 
Riggan, R. C. 
Redditt, T. O. 
Rothe, C. 
Roberds, E. S. 
Rosenbaum, D. M. 
Saul, R. L. 
Scott, J. W. 
Sharborough, W. C 
Smith, L. O. 
Smith, C. A. 
Sweat, F. B. 
Taurrens, L. M. 
Treen, C. W. 
Tubb, W. S. 
Vaughn, M. C. 
Walley, E. P. 
West, H. G 
Wall, W. E. 
White, R. P. 
White, W. R. 
White, E. F. 
Wingo, G. W. 
Womack, M. S. 



208 



-^^^DTKb* Reveille* t&ig^a*,^^ 




bsbbb; 



OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Critic 

Pros. Attorney 

Chaplain 

Parliamentarian 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Censor 

Librarian 

Sergeant-at-Arms 

Anniversarian 



First Term 
Houston, A. F. 
Womack, M. S. 
Casanova, T. H. 
Mercier, D. 
Merrier, D. 
Rothe, C. 
French, H. (). 
Dent, W. W. 
White, E. F. 
Dickey, R. M. 
Guice, J. G. 
Brewer, C. A. 



Second Term 
Casanova, T. H. 
Treen, C. W. 
Houston, A. F. 
Dove, W. E. 
Mercier, D. 
Moodv, C. S. 
Guerry, N. D. 
Blackstrum, J. F. 
Brumfield, C. W. 
Powell, Mrs. 
Bending, H. 



Third Term 
Moodv, C. S. 
Womack, M. S. 
Treen, C. W. 
Dent, W. W. 
Mercier, D. 
Huston, A. E. 
Saul, R. L. 
Scott, J. W. 
Riggan, R. C. 
Powell, Mrs. P. 
Pentercost, E. L. 



209 



^mms&ss^ 1 ^ Revbill^ i^s^s^a^"" 



Philotechnic Literary Society 

OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Critic 

Pros. Attorney 

Chaplain 

Rec. Secretary 

Cor. Secretary 

Parliamentarian 

Treasurer 

Censor 

Librarian 

Sertreant-at-Arms 



Allen, J. L. 
Barrett, C. P. 
Branning, W. J. 
Brien, J. N. 
Britt, J. M. 
Brumfield, C. L. 
Bullock, G. W. 
Burrows, H. H. 
Bates, E. A. 
Bailey, R. L. 
Bausey, H. F. 
Child,' E. 
Caldwell, H. M. 
Cook, T. I. 
Cutrea, T. H. 
Dickey. E. K. 
Fleming, B. J. 
Fleming, R. L. 
Golden, P. M. 
Golden, W. W. 
Harden, J. C. 
Hathorn, E. 



Dennis Jetta, 
Gladney, Hortense 



First Term 
Patrick, J. A. 
Langston, J. M. 
Barrett, C. P. 
Britt, J. M. 
Pope, E. W. 
Wells, P. L. 
Sargent, E. F. B. 

Harden, J. C. 
Livingston, J. S. 
Causey, H. F. 
Burrows, H. H. 



Second Term 
Langston, J. M. 
Caldwell, H. M. 
Herrington, G. L. 
Wheat, W. E. 
Patrick, J. A. 
Sargeant, E. F. B. 
Harden, J. C. 
Mitchell. F. 
Wells, P. L. 
Walker, F. W. 
Herrington, I. L. 
Golden, J. M. 



Third Term 
Herrington, G. L. 
Britt, J. M. 
Caldwell, H. M. 
Langston, J. M. 
Wheat, W. E. 
Owens, W. A. 
Graham, F. C. 
Harden, J. C. 
Sargeant, E. F. B. 
Pittman, C. C. 
Golden, W. W. 
Herrington, I. L. 



MEMBERS 

Holton, T- C. 
Heard, j. M. 
Herrington, G. L. 
Hulett, F. C. 
Herrington, I. L. 
Journey, W. C. 
Kersh, L. L. 
Kyle, H. A. 
Kite, J. C. 
Langston, J. M. 
McBee, L S. 
McCoy, L. E. B. 
McCune, J. K. 
Mclntyre, C. S. 
McKewen, J. S. 
McKinnie, I. 
Mitchell, F. 
Newsom, C. E. 
Olive, J. M. 
Owens, W. A. 
Owens, C. F. 
Patrick, J. A. 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

Gunn, Mabel 
Courts, Grace 



Patton, T. W. 
Pittman, C. C. 
Reeves, G. C. 
Reddit, T. E 
Roper, P. E. 
Sanders, P. H. 
Sargent, E. F. B. 
Shelton, A. D. 
Smith, M. E. 
Smith, E. H. 
Stewart, G. R. 
Taylor, R. W. 
Thorson, K. W. 
Turnage, R. H. 
Upshaw, R. V. 
Wall, W. P. 
Walker, F. W. 
Walker, H. L. 
Wells, P. L. 
Wheat, W. E. 
Wilkinson, D. A. 



Fowler, Susette 



101& 



Hutchinson Agricultural Club 

OFFICERS 



Director 

Vice-Director 

Secretary 

Critic 

Treasurer 

Librarian 

Censor 

Sergeant-at-Arms 



First Term 
Gulledge, F. P. 
West, J. T. 
Brewer, C. A. 
Weldon, D. L. 
Treloar, J. C. 
Roper, P. E. 
Harrison, P. 



Second Term 
Langston, J. M. 
West, J. T. 
Womack, M. S. 
Wade, E. G. 
Roper, P. E. 
Harrison, B. 
Lamb, J. 



Third Term 
Brewer, C. A. 
Terry, A. E. 
Gulledge, E. P. 
Herrington, G. L. 
Overstreet, C. A. 
Dent, W. W. 
Bratton, J. 



Alderman, W. H. Alderman, W. H. 



MEMBERS 



Alderman, W. H. 
Allen, J. B. 
Allen, J. F. 
Armstrong, B. E. 
Backstrom, J. E. 
Barrentine, E. S. 
Bratton, J. 
Brewer, C. A. 
Brown, H. G. 
Brumfield, C. W. 
Chaoman, R. E. 
Cook, F. D. 
Crawford, G L. 
Crocket, E. C. 
Crumpton, J. R. 
Dent, W. W. 
French, H. O. 
Guerrv, N. D. 
Gulledge, E. P. 
Harrison, B. 
Herrington, G. L. 
Kirpatrick, J. H. 
Langston, J. M. 
Lamb, J. 
Martin, L. A. 
McCandliss, D. A. 
McDonald, W. M. 
McCluer, D. 
Mercier, D. 
Miller, M. E. 
Mims, W. 



Mitchell, F. 
Overstreet, C. A. 
Preddy, E. H. 
Ramey, W. E. 
Randall, C. C. 
Raney, H. 
Rhodes, S. W. 
Roberds, E. S. 
Robbins, J. W. 
Roper, P. E. 
Savle, F. L. 
Scott, J. W. 
Smith, C. A. 
Spinks, A. G. 
Stanford, H. C. 
Sharbrough, W. C. 
Tate, W. B. 
Terry, A. E. 
Tingle, J. T. 
Thomae, E. 
Thompson, E. T. 
Treen, C. W. 
Treloar, L C. 
Wade, E.' G. 
Walker, F. W. 
Welch, R. W. R. 
Weldon, D. L. 
West, E T. 
White, E. F. 
Womack, M. S. 




213 



^^^^^Th^RE^BILDB- lm&^f^ggg^ 



Clubs and Organizations 



ALTHOUGH our college curriculum is not designed to give the students very 
much time for outside work, the rocial side of college life is by no means 
neglected on the campus. We have clubs and societies of every kind in which 
groups of students of mutual characteristics band together, and for the time indulge 
in activities which give them the much needed recreation and make them forget the 
monotonous routine of academic work and duties. 

Beginning with the organizations which have an educational purpose, we may 
mention the four literary societies. The members of these are men who desire to 
develop their oratorical talents, for the training of which the College Curriculum does 
not provide. The Engineering Club, Agricultural Club, Textile Club, and Educa- 
tional Club consist of Junior and Senior Engineering, Agricultural, Textile, and 
Educational students. The aim of these clubs is to bring their members in closer con- 
tact with the problems in the held of work in which they receive their training, and 
which they intend to make their life's work. 

Besides the regular Military Organization we have three special Companies, the 
Sabre Company, consisting of members of the Senior Class, the George Rifles, and the 
Lee Guard. The purpose of these Companies is to make their members profficient in 
the use of sabre and rifle, while at the same time the social side is taking care of by 
giving several dances and entertainments during each session. 

The German and Junior Club take care of those students who have the inclina- 
tion for dancing. 

We also have County Clubs organized by the boys from the different counties 
of the state. In the meeting of these clubs the boys of one count}- meet each other, 
become better acquainted, and try everything that is in their power to help each other. 




214 




215 



"^^^^^E^Re^BIUDB* 1^12^^^^^ 



Reflector Board 

EDITORS 
J. A. Patrick, '12, Philotechnic .... 
W. C. Journey, 12, Philotechnic, 



Editor-in-Chief 
Business Manager 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
E. G. Wade, Philomathean 
A. F. Houston, Dialectic 
H. G. Harper, Philalethian 
C. A. Brewer, Dialectic . 
E. Child, Philotechnic 
J. C. Stoy, Philomathean 
C. W. Treen, Dialectic . 
J. M. Langston, Philotechnic 
C. Rothe, Diolectic . 
J. E. Bergman, Philotechnic 
C. P. Barrett, Philotechnic . 



P. E. Roper, '13 
B. Harrison, '13 



Literary 

Literary 

Alumni 

Clubs and Organizations 

Locals 

Locals 

Y. M. C. A. 

Industrial 

Athletics 

Circulation Manager 

Exchange 

Assistant, Editor-in-Chief 
Assistant Business Manager 




216 




HARPER 




-ON :« f^^^ ^ ADE 




^^^^^lh^RE^EMI.I,E- img^^g^^ 




The 

Cap and Bells 

Dramatic 

Club 




Vaughn, J. R. 
Director 



Miss Thorson 
Sponsor 



OFFICERS 



President 
Vice-President 
Sec. and Treas. 



First Term 
Stoy, J. C. 
Varnado, H. R. 
Tisdale, (). R. 



Second Term 
Stoy, J. C. 
Tisdale, O. R. 
Wade, E. G. 



Third Term 
Wade, E. G. 
Child, E. 
Roper, P. E. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Herhert, S. A. McNeil, J. P. 

Child, E. Stoy, J. C. 

Harrison, B. Bratton, J. 

MEMBERS 
Armstrong, B. E. Journey, W. C. 



Brading, R. A. 

Bratton, J. 
Child, E. 
Field, B. L. 
Gentsch, H. S. 
Howard, L. H. 
Harrison, B. 
Harrison, L. 
Herhert, S. A. 



McNeil, J. P. 
McKie, M. S. 
Owens, W. A. 
Roper, P. E. 
Stoy, J. C. 
Thomas, F. D. 
Tisdale, O. R. 
Varnado, H. R. 
Wade, E. G. 



218 




DRAMATIC CLUB 



101£ 




Mississippi Textile Club 

OFFICERS 

Saul, T. G President 

Moody, C. S . • ■ Vice-President 

Coman, R. M Secretary and Treasurer 

Smith, R. R Librarian 



Brooks, C. S. 
Jackson, H. T. 
Owens, C. W. 



MEMBERS 

Quarles, W. M. 
Ruffin, D. A. 
Rife, R. S. 



Smith, R. R. 
Springer, M. E. 
Rogers, J. T. 



HONORARY MEMBERS 
Coman, Prof. J. G. Nelson Prof. H. W. 



1£>1£ 






CALENDAR 



y. * .v 



SEPTEMBER 

1 8 — 400 students enter. More on Campus. 

19 — More students arrive. 

20 — School opens with 800 students and more coming on every train. 

21 — Students still coming. 

22 — Classification of students. 

23 — All students who have not been classified report to Vice-President's office. Signed 

W. H. Magruder. 
24 — Regular duties begin. 

25 — Prof. Hutchinson makes his annual Chapel talk. 
2b — Treen makes canvass of dormitory with Wayne Paper wardrobe. 
29 — A. & M., 29; Mississippi College, o; first football game. 
30 — Extra walkers out for the first time. 



OCTOBER 

3 — Half holiday in honor of the Oktibbeha County Fair. 

4 — No recitations in the School of Agriculture ; all Profs, gone to the fair. 

5 — Seniors order uniforms. 

9 — Did you subscribe for the Reflector ? 
10 — Peter Polly forgets the Lord's prayer in Chapel. 
1 1 — Dr. Magruder goes to sleep in Chapel. 
12 — Ask Varnado who was late at Chapel. 
16 — National Guard members return from McComb City. 
19 — Mass meeting in Chapel. 

20 — Student body goes to Columbus. A. & M., b; Alabama, b. 
21 — Everybody asleep, cuts all hours and get reported. 

23 — Prof. Harned away inspecting Nurseries( ?). Later returns with his wife. 
24 — Capt. Goodale makes speech in Chapel, but fails to kill first hour. 
25 — Miss Howard and Dr. Aicher married in Chapel. 
28 — First Lyceum. 
30 — Preps all smiling. L<niforms are here. 



NOVEMBER 

1 — Six farm demonstrators speak in Chapel and can't kill first hour. 

2 — Student body goes into uniform. 

3 — A. & M., b2 ; Birmingham, o. Preps view the game in full dress. 

8 — Mr. Jackson lands the Reveille contract by bribing the board with 

9 — Visitors from Legislature make speeches in Chapel. 
11 — Dr. Weatherford arrives to conduct State Bible Study Conference. 
13 — Dr. Magruder cuts football rally short. 
14 — Jack eats up a pencil during Chapel exercises. 
17 — Commandant cuts Chapel. 



bo> 



191& 



20 — A. & M., 4; Tulane, 5. Who's happy? 

27 — Mass meeting in Chapel. 

29 — Faculty gives the college yell. Led by President Hardy. 

30 — A. & M., 6; University, o. 



DECEMBER 

1 — Student body returns from Jackson. All tired, but with plenty of coin. 

4 — Formal burial of the University and all their hopes. 

8 — Half the Seniors cut Chapel and get reported. 
12 — Thirty-four cases of mumps in hospital. Preps having a swell time. 
17 — Preps alarmed at nine-thirty. Hog pen on fire. 
18 — Exams begin. 
22 — Preps leave for home. Billy lost another turkey. The Commandant's chickens 

were slightly disturbed. Brewer's peanuts go by the wholesale. 
23 — Football team leaves for Cuba. 



JANUARY 
2 — Boys begin to return from the holidays. 
3 — School begins. 

12 — Seniors get reported for wearing citz. 

13 — Seniors get reported for wearing uniform. 

18 — Reveille Board meets. Smith gone to town. 

22 — President Hardy goes to Jackson. 

2^ — Seniors practice football. 

25 — Legislature attacks Prep department. 

27 — Seniors and Juniors tie up. Nothing to nothing. 



FEBRUARY 

1 — A. & M. trounces Union in basketball. 

2 — Dutchy, while acting Major, marches Lucy over the watering trough. 

3 — First Dramatic Club play. 

5 — Freshman-Sophomore game. Freshman, o; Sophomore, 10. 

6 — A. & M. trounces L. S. U. in basketball. 
11 — Dr. Hull lectures to Y. M. C. A. 
12 — Celebration of Lincoln's birthday. 
13 — Rev. Nash Broyles makes talk on morality. 
14 — Same. 
1 5 — Same. 
16 — Same. 
17 — Lyceum. 

19 — Reveille Board meets with Lobdell on time. 
22 — Sophs celebrate Washington's birthday. 
29 — Miss Critz makes announcement in Chapel. 

24 — I. 1. & C. girls on campus. Treen, officer of the day. Look out Preps. 
28 — Fifty-five corporals reduced. 



MARCH 

2 — Jack comes to Chapel with his hair combed. 
6 — Sophomores repentant. 
8 — Mr. Hounsell addresses the student body. 
J 1 — Examinations begin. 

lb — All material for Reveille leaves. Business manager and Editor-in-Chief want 
something to do. 

222 



tS>12 



REPORTS 



Report — Prof. W. H. Magruder allowing speaker to kill first hour on 

February 12. Special report 10 tours 

Report — Prof. F. D. Mellen trying to impersonate Abraham Lincoln . . 10 tours 
Prof. Magruder going to sleep while Prof. Herbert was speaking . 10 tours 

Prof. Maxwell wearing hat in Chapel 10 tours 

Prof. P. P. Garner continually wearing long face 10 tours 

Prof. McKay, same 5 tours 

Prof. Critz chewing gum in section room 5 tours 

Prof. Hutchinson smoking in section room 5 tours 

Col. T. C. Musgrave stepping on his feet at battalion parade . 25 tours 
C. W. Treen reports cadets because I. I. & C. girls were watch- 
ing him 20 tours 

T. H. Casanova claiming to be a hypnotist and forgetting his 

profession 10 tours 

H. G. Harper refusing to have picture made for the Demosthen- 

ean Club, because Treen was a member of same .... 10 tours 
B. L. Field imitating Commandant while instructing Sabre Com- 
pany, while same was present 10 tours 

H. Cunningham showing ignorance of electricity by catching hold 

of two exceedingly live wires. Punishment sufficient. 
J. N. Stevenson not changing bed clothes, but once during session 5 tours 
J. R Routten allowing Commandant's chickens to be stolen during 

holidays 15 tours 

Prof. C. Leake not putting knees together when having picture 

taken 5 tours 

Same, running to keep up at Guard Mount 10 tours 

Prof. B. M. Walker repeated failure in Freshman Algebra . . 15 tours 
Prof. J. C. Hardy continually going to Jackson to see Legislature 

without a permit 10 tours 

Prof. F. J. Weddell correcting short stories in sleep. S. R. . . 10 tours 
W. C. Journey going to sleep on bridge between college and town, 

and staying until 3 :oo A. M. waiting for roommate ... 5 tours 

F. D. Thomas smiling once during 191 2 session 5 tours 

Same (Playing buddies) with Treen by keeping him on Regi- 
mental staff table, when he should have been on Battalion 

staff 10 tours 

Miss Mable Gunn accusing (Bill) Owens of being "Hungry" . 5 tours 
Miss Hortense Gladney trying to persuade Prof. Blocker to walk 

home with her 10 tours 

Miss Susette Fowler making love to Gentsch while holding: 

Mercier's hand. Special report 15 tours 

Miss Jetta Dennis continually lureing Bergman away from 

campus 5 tours 

Miss Courtz attempting to flirt with ordinance sergeant Hall . 10 tours 



223 



Otertnan 




OFFICERS 



Smith M D. 






President 






i 


Secretary 




MEMBERS 






Armstrong, B. E. 


Myers, J. S. 






Baird, CO. 


Martin, L. A. 






Bergman, J. E. 


McNeil, J. P. 






Brogan, W. 


McDermott, R. [. 






Bratton, J. 


McClure, ]. C. 






Cunningham, H. 


Olson, L. A. 






Cook, A. B. 


Rhodes, A. L. 






Coleman, S. A. 


Rhodes, S. W. 






English, M. L. 


Rosenbaum, D. M. 






Field, B. L. 


Roberds, C. E. 






Gilleland, G. T. 


Stoy, J. C. 






Gardner, F. W. 


Stevenson, J. N. 






Hogan, J. B. 


Smith, C. B. 






Jennings, M. 


Thomae, E. 






Lipe, R. E. 


Wade, E. G 






Magruder, F. H. 







224 




GERMAN CLUB 



22S 



^^^^T^E^ Re^3IDIyE^ i£>ifi^%§^^ 




Clay County Club 

OFFICERS 

Brogan, W President 

Saul, T. G. . . . . . . . . Vice-President 

Moody, C. S. . . . . . . . . Secretary and Treasurer 



Allen, J. L. 
Bonds, R. C. 
Clardy, W. J. 
Dill, A. E. 
Fagg, L. W. 



MEMBERS 

Howard, F. M. 
Jovner, V. H. 
Lowerv, C. D. 
Marshall, A. R. 
McFadden, T. 



Reed, L. A. 
Rife, R. S. 
Saul, R. L. 
Saul, S. S. 
Tern, G. B. 



226 



^^^^The- Reveille- i^is^s^^^ 




Enochs, J. W. 
Ellard, F. 
Crane, J. W. 



A. & M. Science Club 

OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



MEMBERS 
Crawford, W. W. Dale, S. B. 

Coffey, J. C. Garner, M. 

Freeman, G. M. 



227 



1£>1& 




Rankin County Club 

OFFICERS 



Patrick, J. A. 
Magilvra, B. L. 
Williams, D. L. 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



MEMBERS 




Martin, R. R. 
Jones, W. H. . 
Mclngtyre, C. S. 
Kersh, L. L. . 
Stevens, E. B. . 
Harris, S. A. 
Berry, J. T. . 
Magilvra, B. L. 
Leggett, H. H. 
Mangum, W. N. 
Cox, C. G. 
Williams, D. L. 
Patrick, J. A. 



Braxton, 

Jackson, 

Johns, 

Brandon, 

Braxton, 

Mendenhall, 

Brandon, 

Brandon, 

Florence, 

Greenfield, 

Jackson, 

Florence, 

Johns, 



Miss. 
Miss. 
Miss. 
Miss. 
Miss. 
Miss. 
Miss. 
Miss. 
Miss. 
Miss. 
Miss. 
Miss. 
Miss. 



Miss Alice Noel 
Sponsor 



228 



^^^^JfriB- RE^BIIvI^ i^i&^s^^^ 




Walley, e. p. 
Backstrom, J. F., Jr. 
Rich, C. S. 



Richton Club 

OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



MEMBERS 
Cochran, I. B. Smith, H. M. 

Coaker, D. C. Wade, J. J. 

Mills, R. Wade, S. I. 

Rich, A. A. Walley, E. L. 

Smith, T. A. 




Miss Spruce 
Sponsor 



229 



-^sssgZZg&Q^ Rb^billb- i&iz^^^^^- 




Oktibbeha County Club 



OFFICERS 



Crumpton, H. B. 
Reed, M. D. . 
McReynolds. E. C. 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 




MEMBERS 
Brynum, W. M. 
Carpenter, S. D. 
Gaston, B. W. 
Goddard, E. M. 
McKee, J. A. 
McReynolds, E. C. 
Mims, L. D. 



Reed, K. S. 
Stewart, F. E. 
Upchurch, G. A. 
Wafford, J. W. 
Taylor, T. L. 
Livingston, J. S. 



Miss Mary Evans Lampkin 
Sponsor 



230 



'^^^^^^^Re^bilde- lois^f^ggr^ 




Pou, P. W. 
Ramey, W. E. . 
Graham. F. C. 
Harrison, W. L. 



Wayne County Club 

MOTTO 
"To make lonely moments merry.' 

COLORS 

Purple and White. 



OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



Busby, R. E. 
Cooler, J. J. 
Davis, E. 



Odom, H. W. 
Pou, W. L. 
West, J. T. 




Miss Gray 
Sponsor 



231 



"^-^ggg^^l^RE^BILI^ l^l&^Ss^g^ 




Harrison, B. 
Hall, D. S. 



Louisiana Club 



OFFICERS 



President 
Vice-President 




Anders, C. B. 
Blanchard, J. T. 

Fendicker, E. C. 
Harrison, B. 
Hall, D. S. 
Kimball, G. B. 



MEMBERS 

Moore, S. R. 
Moore, J. B. 
McWilliams, W. R. 
Naff, H. H. 
Scott, J. W. 
Trevelean, H. H. 



Miss Adams 
Sponsor 



232 



ATALLA COUNTY CLUB. 

m v m 




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J?-= 



23j 



"^^^^^IhB- Re^bila^ lmg^^gsp^ 




Monroe County Club 



PASTIME 

Amusing ourselves by appeasing hunger 

COLORS MOTTO 

Chicken Brown "Live and Learn" 

OFFICERS 

McNiel, J. P. President 

Roberos, C. E. ......... Vice-President 

West, H. G. . . . . . . . Secretary and Treasurer 




MEMBERS 



Bibby, F. F. 
Brewer, N. I. 
Burns, J. P. 
Byrd, E. H. 
Cain, L. L. 
Chaffin, J. 
Cocherham, H. I. 
Crosby, L. C. 



English, M. L. 
Heard, J. M. 
Heard, M. J. 
Lenoir, F. S. 
McHenry, A. B. 
Riggan, R. C. 
Roberds, E. S. 
Tubb, W. L. 



Miss Bessie Leftwich 
Sponsoi 



234 



^^gg^^r^REv-BiLLE- lmz^gssss&r^ 




wt ' B 

ii 

Yalobusha County Club 

OFFICERS 

SAYLE, F. L President 

York, C. V. . . . ... . . . Vice-President 

Watkins, R. S Secretary 

York, W Treasurer 



MEMBERS 
York, E. L. Quarks, Wm. 

Consley, H. L. Priddy, E. H. 

McLaw, T- L. 




Miss Stevens 
Sponsor 



235 



■^^^^^^b-Re^biLvIvB- imz^^^^^ 





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9* * a^-gc' 4 




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HBw — > £ 8 





Carroll County Club 

PURPOSE 

To make life more pleasant and sociable while in college. 

MOTTO 

"By our efforts we hope to rise. 

OFFICERS 

Neal, H. S President 

Taylor, R. W. Vice-President 

Pentecost, E. L Secretary 

Lee, B. J . . . . . . . . . . Treasurer 




Miss Em Scruggs 
Sponsor 



MEMBERS 



Armstrong, S. C. 
Bowlin, R. L. 
Conger, B. C. 
Crow, L. G. 
Davis, W. R. 
Eubanks, B. F. 
Flowers, E. L. 
Journey, L. S. 
Kimbrough, M. M. 



236 



McGregor, P. N. 
McCarty, J. C. 
McCuno, J. K. 
Mortimer, T. C. 
Nelms, A. M. 
Sanders, B. B. 
Tardy, T. W. 
Wells, H. L. 



^^^^^^IhE- REV*>ILLB* I^IS^^^T^ 



4 * Jl# t 

>. ^.v ^^m ^^^ ^ -*" ^ ^ 



Spinks, P. E. . 

Ov'ERSTREET, C. A. 

Spinks, A. G. . 



Kemper County Club 

OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



Adams, S. C. 
Bounds, W. R. 
Clark, J. W. 
Davis, H. W. 
King, L. R. 
Lavender, F. C. 



MEMBERS 

McArthur, R. 
McArthur, H. 
McKaskill, K. H. 
McWilliams, L. C. 
Stennis, H. A. 




Miss Lagette 
Sponsor 



237 



-^^gsjgg^E- Reveille- i©i&^^^^^" 




Leflore County Club 

MOTTO 
Be Square 

PASSWORD 

Praeterias Ponus Amicus 



OFFICERS 

Mathews, R. E. . . . . . . . . President 

Allen, J. B. . . . . . . . . . . Vice-President 

Flowers, B. H. . . . . . . Secretary 

Lipe, R. E. ..... Treasurer 




Miss Baugh 
Sponsor 



MEMBERS 



Allen, J. B. 
Barrentime, E. S. 
Deloach, G. D. 
Feigler, J. D. 
Flanagan, H. G. 
Flowers, B. H. 
Kersey, E. W. 



238 



Lipe, R. E. 
Mathews, R. E. 
Peterson, J. D. 
Seitz, J. E. 
Walton, B. 
Young, W. T. 




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'^^ T^Re^biIvLB- l^ig^^^^r^ 




Newton County Club 

OFFICERS 

Cook, T. I President 

Bolton, J. L. . . . . . . . . . Vice-President 

Pace, J. F. ........ Secretary and Treasurer 



B*^l 


ra 


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Anderson, J. W. 
Bolton, J. L. 
Blackburn, E. 
Cook, T. I. 
Harper, W. W. 



MEMBERS 

McMullen, J. Q. B. 
Pace, J. F. 
Pierce, W. W. 
Thames, J. M. 



Miss Norris 
Sponsor 



240 



[E- Re^e-illb^ lQis^ss^gg^ 




McBee, J. S. . 
Thorsex, K. W. 
Freeman, G. M. 



Sunflower County Club 

OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



-MEMBERS 



Beeson, G. C. 
Barnett, M. M. 
Blackwood, G. T. 
Blackwood, H. G. 
Chapman, C. P. 
Critz, G. H. 



Davis, L. B. 
Fletcher, L. 
Johnson, D. 
Martin, H. C. 
Powell, C. E. 
Peterson, J. G. 




Miss Thorsen 

Sponsor 



241 



^^^^^^T^^RE^^HvivE- l^iS^^g^T^ 




Webster County Club 

OFFICERS 



WOMACK, M. S. 

Scott, A. 
Cook, F. D. . 
Britt, J. M. 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 




MEMBERS 
Arnold, W. A. Scott, A. 



Britt, J. M. 
Cook, F. D. 
Dunlap, R. L. 



Scott, J. C. 
Springer, M. E. 
Womack, M. S. 



Miss Thomas 
Sponsor 



2+2 



1012 




Amite County Club 

MOTTO 

"Hew to the line; and let the chips fall where they will." 

COLORS 

Orange and Purple. 

OFFICERS 

Newman, J. L President 

Wall, W. P. . . . . . . . . Vice-President 

Caraway, J. O Secretary 

Stewart, G. R. . . . . . . . . . Treasurer 

MEMBERS /^i 

Bates, E. A. Newman, J. L. 

Ball, I. H. Randall, C. C. / 

Ball, D. D. Reynolds, M. G. ' 

Butler, K. L. Raiban, T. 

Caraway, J. O. Stewart, G. R. 

Gordon, I. F. Travis, B. S. \ 

Hughes, D. M. Wall, W. P. 

Hewitte, H. H. Whittington, C. E. 
Mcintosh, T. L. 

Miss Travi 
Sponsor 

243 





244 



"^^^^^rhE- Revvbillb* i^i&^^^^ 




Covington County CI 


lib 


OFFICERS 




Langstox, ]. M. . 




Watson. E. L. . 


Vice-President 


Wall, W. E 


Secretary and Treasurer 


MEMBERS 




McGee, A. L. 




j^A Vfet 


^^m^^_ 


j»y ^^^k 


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fit i vv. ii. 


jfi ^l 


A Lott, V. D. 


jB ^ 


r^*RA 


jB SB***" ' l ^B A 


^., B Rogers, F. 


1* '"* ***■ 


yS| Rogers, S. 


■ ■ Jh 


^^A ^^B Hf 


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^1 I | Sumrall, J. R. 
^Am % * ■ W Sumrall, R. E. 


^^^ T 




^^ M y Walker, A. E. 




^^1, ^^ 




Watts, J. L. 




Honorary Member Welch, R. W. R. 


Miss Spell 


Marvin Geiger Worthington, F. H. 


Sponsor 



245 



-^l^ggSfe^hE- RE^E>IULI^ lOlS^gSs^gP^ 



Lowndes County Club 

MOTTO 

"Mississippians for Mississippi." 

PURPOSE 

'To promote a warmer friendship, and more cordial relations among the sons of 

Lowdnes." 

FAVORITE FLOWER 

Clover Blossoms. 



Thrower, T. B. 
O'Brien, C. W. 
Smith, R. R. 



OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



MEMBERS 
Anderson, W. L. McCullough, J. D. 




Miss Cox 
Sponsor 



Ashmore, P. D. 
Butts, J. L. 
Butts, A. B., '] 
Burton, J. R. 
Cook, A. B. 
Cox, C. J. 
Evans, T. S. 
Guerry, N. D. 
Harrison, L. 
Harrison, B. 
Haynil, J. C. 
Henkel, M. R. 
Henkel, J. O. 
McClure, J. C. 



Nance, R. R. 
Robertson, O. W. 
Roberds, J. N. 
Stephenson, W. C. 
Stansel, H. S. 
Sherman, H. S. 
Vaughn, J. R., 'n 
Vaughn, M. C. 
Vaughn, R. O. 
Waddell, H. M. 
Weaver, W. B. 
Watson, J. A. 
West, H. 



246 




LOWNDES COUNTY CLUB 



^47 



"^^B^^^b-Re^biulb- iGig^mm^" 




White, E. F. 
White, R. P. 
Terry, A. E. 



The Lawrence County Club 



OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 




Miss Bond 
Sponsor 



MEMBERS 
Carr, T. C. 
White, W. R. 
White, C. D. 



248 



^^^^g^^Th^ Rbwmu.^ iois^^^^^ 




Brewer. C. A. 

WOMACK, M. S. 

Owens, W. A. 



Allen, A. h. 
Burns, J. B. 
Miss Gunnell 



OFFICERS 



MEMBERS 

Tinslev, C. M. 
Wallev, E. P. 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



Preddy, E. H. 
Sponsor 



PURPOSE 
In search of light. 

MOTTO 

BrotherU love, truth and friendship. 



249 



^^g^^^JTh^ Re^bill^ i@i&,^^zg^^ 




Marshall County Club 

OFFICERS 



Miller, M. E. 
Hurdle, E. F. 
Roper, P. E. 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 




MEMBERS 

Cox, J. E. 
Greer, C. K. 
Greer, R. A. 
Mason, W. W. 
Malone, W. B. 
McClatchery, W. B. 
McDermont, R. J. 



Miller, D. W. 
McKie, M. S. 
Rogers, C. G. 
Tucker, R. L. 
Tucker, H. L. 
Sides, L. M. 



Miss Moore 
Sponsor 



250 



~^^^^^ThE- Reveille- 1^12^5^^^ 




Ittawamba County Club 



MEMBERS 



Brown, L. 
Gaither, H. 
Gaither, W. 
Gaither, E. 
Grimes, D. W. 



Harmon, S. A. 
Reed, A. K. 
Roberts, C. D. 
Toomer, T. 




Miss Effie Grimes 
Sponsor 



251 



101& 




Miss Avery Caldwell, Sponsor 
Jacksonville, Ala. 

Cosmopolitan Club 

OFFICERS 



Journey, W. C. 
Hall, D. S. . 

ROUTTEN, J. R. 



Anders, C. B. 
Baird, C. O. . 
Chadwick, A. R. 
Connaway, J. E. 
Cooper, S. F. . 
Cox, J. E. . 
Crossett, J. L. 
Cunningham, H. 
Dasher, M. R. 
Faircloth, J. L. 
Fitzgerald, R. H. 
Elliott, C. N. . 
Fudicker, E. C. 
Gardner, J. 
Gardner, F. W. 
Hogg, G. A. . 
Harrison, B. 
Jennings, M. . 
Kohorn, S. D. . 
Kimball, G. B. 
Lamoon, Nai 



Jacksonville, Ala. 

Stonewall, La. 
Heathesville, La. 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



Calhoun, La. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Marietta, Ohio. 

Memphis, Tenn. 

Marengo, Mich. 

Colliersville, Tenn. 

Moscow, Tenn. 

Evergreen, Ala. 

Augusta, Ga. 

Union City, Tenn. 

. Pelham, N. C. 

. . Poole, Ark. 

Monroe, La. 

Memphis, Tenn. 

. LaLande, N. M. 

. Pine Bluff, Ark. 

New Orleans, La. 

. . Albion, Midi. 

. . Mobile, Ala. 

Arizona, La. 

Korat, Siam. 



Margolis, D. . . New York, N. Y. 
Mason, B. I. . . . Moscow, Tenn. 
Massengikl, W. K. Henderson, Tenn. 
Moore, J. B. ... Burnside, La. 

Moore, S. R Monroe, La. 

McCalla, J. B. . . Memphis, Tenn. 
McWilliams, W. R. . Monroe, La. 

Naff, H. H Bastrop, La. 

Nesbitt, R. D. . . Piedmont, S. C. 
Owens, C. W. . Germantown, Tenn. 
Price, E. B. . . . Tuscumbia, Ala. 
Price, F. G. ... Cherokee, Ala. 
Roper, P. E. . . Festherston, Okla. 

Pothe, C Cairo, 111. 

Scoates, H. W. . . . 

Stogsdill, W. O. . . . Fackler, Ala. 

Scott, R. A Ashwood, La. 

Stoy, J. C Augusta, Ga. 

Treleaven, H. H. . New Orleans, La. 
Turbin, C. A. . . . . Chicago, 111. 
Wheat, W. E. . . . Mobile, Ala. 



252 




253 



imz 




Casanova, T. H. 
Boddie. G. 

OvERSTREET, C. 




Gulf Coast Club 

OFFICERS 



Sponsor 
Miss Cowan 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



Alleman, A. B. 
Alleman, A. F. 
Broadus, L. L. 
Breland, G. W. 
Bradford, P. S. 
Bolton, W. T. 
Boddie, G. 
Couret, G. J. 
Couret, A. B. 
Chinn, T. G. 
Casanova, T. H. 
Casanova, A. H. 
Fuente, A. R. 



Frentz, G P. 
Jopes, I. 

McAuthor, W. B. 
McAuthor, D. 
Moorman, J. S. 
Netto, L. J. 
Overstreet, C. 
Russ, W. D. 
Robinson, W. E. 
Simmons, V. L. 
Vance, L. E. 
Young, O. A. 



254 



"^^ JlK& Re&exlu* l^l&^^^g^^ 




Thirteen Militarists 

OFFICERS 

Roper, P. E. . . . . . . . . . . President 

Caine, L. L. . . . . . . . Secretary and Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Armstrong, B. E. . . Company "A.'' 

Caine, L. L "B." 

Rilev, J. W. ... " "C." 
Roper, P. E. . . . " "D.- 
Watson, E. L. . . . "E. 

McMurphv, H. H. . " "F." <-"* 

Mingee, W. M. . . " "G." 

Roberds, E. S. . . . " "H." f| ^ 

Nash, H. E. . . . " "I." 

Mingee, G. C. . . . " "K." 

Mingee, E. W. . . " "L." 

Prosser, J. L. . . . " "M." 

Miss Susette Fowler 
Sponsor 




255 




256 



~* s ^^ i ^ Ss ^£*RE^:BII^B* imZ^0^2gg0^ 




McKinnon, M. M. 
Jones, E. 
McPhearsox , H. A. 



Tate County Club 

OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



Bailey, W. P. 
Coppedge, E. E. 
Hurt, C. A. 
House, J. B. 
Hudson, R. E. 
Latimer, R. A. 
Massey, L. L. 
Pace, H. B. 
Rich, J. C. 



Roseborough, W. 
Roseborough, J. L. 
Rook, C. G. 
Stevens, H. W. 
Still, W. E. 
Scott, W. J. 
Scott, T. J. 
Scott, D. A. 
Thweat, W. K. 




Miss Thweatt 
Sponsor 



257 



101S 




Scott County Club 

OFFICERS 

Cranberry, C. E. . . . . . . . . . . President 

Thompson, E. T. . . . . . . . . Vice-President 

McMurphy. H. H. . . . . . . . Secretary and Treasurer 




MEMBERS 
Burnham, J. R. McCoy, G. R. 

Banks, H. H. Pace, W. B. 

Golden, J. M. Robbins, J. N. 

Kidd, J. F. Rew, F. A. 

Mclllhenny, G. L. Underwood, C. K. 



Miss Ethel Haddon 
Sponsor 



258 




259 



101& 




Panola County Club 

OFFICERS 

Nelson, C. B. President 

Chapman, R. E. . . . . . . . . Vice-President 

Ruffin, R. ........ Secretary and Treasurer 



MEMBERS 

Bowen, W. R. McGehee, A. 

Dunning, A. B. North. E. S. 

Hamilton, A. G. Ruffin, W. F. 

Harmon, D. I. Smith, J. C. 

Jackson, N. S. Smith, M. P. 
McDade, W. M. 




Miss Brown 
Sponsor 



260 



^s^^z^ The- Reveille- imSt^sss&pr* 




Lafayette County Club 

OFFICERS 



Treloar, J. C. 



MEMBERS 
Harris, R. C. Parks, C. S. 

Harris, (). P. Bedenbough, M. M. 

Crawford, W. M. Mayfidd. W. B. 



President 




Miss Childress 
Sponsor 



261 



101& 




Pike County Club 

PURPOSE 
To toot our own horns and those of Pike county's. 

MOTTO 

"Do or die." 



Brewer, C. A. 
Pope, E. W. . 
Smith, C. A. . 
Brumfield, C. W. 




Miss Williams 
Sponsor 



OFFICERS 



MEMBERS 



Alexander, R. S. 
Bacot, M. C. 
Brumfield, C. L. 
Bearden, H. J. 
Beaden, C. C. 
Beard, C. L. 
Bullock, E. R. 
Bullock, G. W. 
Bullock, C. T. 
Bullock, L. E. 
Boyd, H. L. 
Causey, H. F. 
Cothern, H. J. 
Cutrer, F. H. 

262 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



Dunaway, L. L. 
Elezv, E. V. 
Howell, E E. 
Lee, B. F. 
Morgan, E. G. 
Pitman, C. C. 
Patterson, T. M. 
Reeves, G. C. 
Smith, C. S. 
Varando, O. D. 
Varando, H. R. 
Tate, W. B. 
Tate, J. J. 




263 



"^^gS^J!>iE^REW3ILL^ 1@1^^^^^^ 



THE GREY EYE 

Misery and Wretchedness walk silently in multiform array throughout the dreary 
confines of the earth ; Sorrow and Despair, stealthily, slowly, — but surely — gather 
about them their sepulchral habiliments of woe and utter ruin, and intercept with 
white, bloodless, and quivering fingers, the paths of men. Death, red-handed with the 
hot, spluttering, seething gore of the innocent, stalks uninterruptedly with upraised 
hands of evil, sin, and glaring, fiendish eyes of remorseless and unconquerable hate, 
about the souls of the Good and Just. 

* * * * * * * 

My Christian name is Pierre ; that of my family, I will not mention. Suffice it 
to say, that my ancestral line is a long one, reaching far back into antiquity, those days 
when every man was the other's enemy. 

My father, I never knew, dying before my birth ; my mother, so good, so pure 
and gentle, died as I was approaching my seventh year. I was left to the tender care 
and solicitude of my only relative, an old uncle, who had lived for several years aloie 
with his only daughter, Lorene. My uncle was rich, and like nearly all old, rich men, 
he lived in almost seclusion. Morose, silent, and very reserved, he sat locked within 
his darkened library throughout the day, never allowing the entrance of anyone, save 
his own servant. 

From some unaccountable reason, my uncle seemed to take a great fancy to me 
almost immediately upon my arrival. He took me into his library, this hitherto "un- 
approachable and mysterious den of the beast," as his neighbors termed it, and there 
would keep me for hours, never permitting me to speak or move from the deep- 
cushioned chair in which he invariably placed me. Of course, this proved to be very 
irksome to me, my child's nature rebelled, and often, I would make a futile and in- 
glorious attempt to escape through the locked door and carefully barred windows, only 
to be watched more closely in the future by his ever furtive eyes. Slowly, very slowly, 
I became reconciled to my uncontrollable Fate ; a kind of settled stoicism came over 
me; all throughout the day and far into the night I would sit almost immovable be- 
fore the continual, slowly flickering fire, studying the rugged and harsh features of my 
uncle. 

When my relative had seemingly convinced himself that I had become reconciled 
to my position, he would give me a book, commanding me in no very pleasant tone to 
read to him. For the first time, I found out the character of bis studies. Rooks on 
psychology, metaphysics, theosophy, and spiritualism "ere. and had been his constant 
companions for these many years. The verv soul of these mvstic authors, from the 
ancient writings of Joseph de Glanville in his Mysteries of the Will, to the modern 
Dr. Hudson in his Laws of Psychic Phenomena, he had imbibed until thev had be- 
come an essential part of him. With creat care, he would explain these almost un- 
fathomable passages, until T could repeat in my own lanpuaee, the meam'ne conveyed 
bv the author. This was always followed bv a Ion? discourse upon the mysteries of 
life, always ending with the words: "Youna man, the eye is tlv seat of the will and 
the transmitter of thoughts. Remember!" 

For fifteen years. I had studied in this manner under the neverceasine super- 
vision of mv old uncle. I had Gradually acquired his characteristics, his attitude, — 
in fact, his thoughts were mine in every respect. I nmed "o lonp-er with voutbful 
enthusiasm for the beautiful "out of doors," the srlorious sunshine, or the communion 
of mv fellow man. T irrew morose, sad, and despondent of life a< T had formerly 
known it, — but T reioiced in mv bitterness. The a< T e of twe"tv-two fou"d me a weak, 
pale, dejected and bitter, but mystically intellectual, old man. 

I had never seen Lorene but once. Tt was the dav that I had arrived at this, my 

264 



1012 



future home, that I saw and spoke to her for the first time, — this beautiful and gentle 
girl of twelve. With child-like awe and perfect amazement, 1 had looked upon her 
sweet, spiritual face, so pure and angelic in its contour. With silent — almost noise- 
less — steps she had that day walked about the house with the old woman-servant, her 
governess. Her verv presence, her low, even, quiet voice sounded as distant, hushed 
music to my ears, and her cold, clear, almost crystal-like gray eyes with their electric 
rays, seemed to penetrate my inmost soul in their intensity. 

Deep were the impressions that were made upon me that day by this girl, m\ 
hitherto unknown cousin. For a long time afterwards, even after my conciliation to 
the absurdities and eccentricities of my old relative, her father, I could hear with vivid 
and lurid imagination that beautiful, music voice, it seemed to be in everything that I 
heard. When awake or sleep, I could see those old, piercing, crystalline eyes; they 
seemed to my highly excited imagination, to be watching me in every movement that 
I made. 

Lorene was never allowed within her father's library and apartments; I was never 
allowed outside of them. Years past — and I forgot my cousin, the day of my arrival 
was to me as only a hazy and very indistinct dream. I lived and grew within my own 
domain of thoughts; she in hers; my nature developed into a something fiendish and 
heinous; hers, in an atmosphere of love and purity, grew into a something sublime in 
its ethereal essence. 1 was as a demon cast upon the rugged and chaotic rocks of 
intellectuality; she was as an intangible divine spirit; gently floating through space on 
the effulgent, spiritual pinions of sacred love. 

My uncle was now approaching his seventieth birthday; — steadily, slowly, but 
surely, he was fast approaching that goal, which through his long years of metaphysical 
study, he had attempted to avoid. Hut still his was an unchanged nature; morose, 
bitter, and sarcastic of life's realities, he grew more feeble and decrepit. However, 
his decreasing physical powers seemed only to stimulate his greater mentality. He 
now never permitted me a moment's rest throughout the day, — I was kept constantly 
reading to him and listening to his mystical discourses. 

His birtlulav arrived. That morning I assisted him from his bedroom to the li- 
brarj and gently placed him in his great arm-chair. I immediately went to a book 
case and took down a volume of Eliphas Levi's Transcendental Magic, his favorite 
morning study. To my surprise, he refused it; very tersely he commanded me to re- 
turn it to its place. I was more surprised when he told me to bring him a Bible, then 
motioned me to a seat. He apparently found, in a short time, that passage for which 
he was seeking. He soon laid the book down and sat gazing into the fire. For hours 
he sat — for hours he continued his meditations, never speaking nor deigning to notice 
me. 

Night was now drawing near, the sun was casting its last flickering rays through 
the low shrubbery in the lawn. Into the windows of the library and across the deeply 
carpeted floor, quaint, fantastic shadows were creeping, casting, as it seemed, a faint, 
ruddy-golden halo about the head of my aged uncle. For the first time, since he had 
requested the Bible, he spoke, quoting from Job : 

"Then a spirit passed before my fare; the hair of my flesh stood up; it stood 
still, but 1 could not discern the form thereof; an image before mine eyes; there was 
silence!" He paused and turned his glittering, almost maniacal eyes upon me; again 
he spoke : 

"Young man, the spirit has passed ; for the first time in my existence, I have had 
fear; it did stand still, and there must be silence. I have to-day, lived the three score 
years and ten allotted to me by Him, who controlleth the destiny of all. To-night, I 
die. At twelve o'clock, I shall have ceased to exist, it is decreed that I must return 
to that realm of immortal spirits from which I came. He paused, then I ventured to 
speak : 

265 



"It is decreed, Uncle." 

Again, he spoke: "All of mine is yours, young man. My daughter is yours. 
Pierre, it is my wish that you marry Lorene. You may not remember her ; that 
matters not. Listen! "The eye is the seat of the will and the transmitter of thoughts. 
Remember!" 

Again, I spoke: 

"1 will remember, Uncle." 

The sun sank; the shadows of evening crept about the gloomy and somber walls 
of the room. Night came on; the hours passed wearily away. I had been reading at 
times, during which 1 was trying to recall the day that I had seen Lorene. My uncle 
interrupted my thoughts: 

"Pierre, it lacks only fifteen minutes of being twelve; ring for the woman, and 
tell her to bring Lorene hither." 

I did as 1 was bid, stoically, a mere automaton] under the will of my uncle, as I 
had been since childhood. Unhesitatingly, I rang for the old servant. In a few words, 
I told her, remaining seated without looking up; just as quickly the old woman re- 
turned, Lorene with her. 

The old man stretched forth his arms to his child: "Lorene, my daughter, at 
twelve o'clock my will ceases. This man, your cousin, must be your husband ; 1 must 
have your promise before that will ceases to exist. Young man, young woman, look 
upon each other." 

Slowly and steadily, 1 looked to where Lorene was standing; quietly — gently she 
turned her eyes upon me. With a shriek, wild piercing, and demoniacal, I fell 
shuddering back in my chair. / remembered: it was still the same cold, crystalline 
gray eye that looked upon me. In a moment I had recovered my self-possession and 
almost unconsciously spoke : 

"Uncle, your will is mine; Lorene shall be my wife." Almost in the same breath, 
the beautiful, the pure and gentle Lorene spoke: 

"Father, your will is mine, my cousin will be my husband." 

The next day my uncle was buried ; at exactly twelve o'clock, at the end of his 
seventieth birthday, in the presence of his only daughter and his nephew, he quietly 
passed away — his will had ceased to exist. On the next day, Lorene and I were 
married. 

We continued to live in her home, the only home that I had known; the only 
world of which she was cognizant. Happy indeed, were the days that we spent to- 
gether, in each other's presence. We had learned to love ; ardent, passionate and 
devoted were our mutual affections — our very souls were blended. Her purity, her 
love so divine, so sacred, seemed about to overcome my moroseness and almost fiendish 
hate of humanity. Her voice and presence enraptured me as it had done on that day 
when we had met as children. I felt as if I would give my soul for her, that I would 
have given ten thousand lives, had I possessed them, for her. 

There was only one thing that worried me, and continually marred my happiness, 
and that was — her gray eyes. I do not even remember of ever having looked her 
straight into those eyes ; — they were unbearable to me. This aversion to her eyes may 
have been the starting point, I do not know, — but our happiness was not long to con- 
tinue. In time, I came to feel that I did not need her, that she was in my way. I 
did not wish to tell her; — perhaps it was my uncle's will — I now avoided her as much 
as possible. 

For hours, I would sit alone in the library ; for hours I would sit and muse, 
pondering over my past and present. A kind of melancholia, more powerful than I 
had ever known, settled over me. I came to hate myself, a hatred as deep-seated as the 
hatred which I bore to all humanity. 

It was in one of these deep melancholy moods, that I was sitting in my arm- 

266 



1012 



chair, on a dark and dreary night, before a slowly blazing fire in the library. Out 
side, the wind was roaring and howling; the rain was beating against the window 
panes, and lurid flashes of blue lightning came through the darkened room, casting 
ghost-iilce shadows upon the walls beyond. My thoughts seemed to partake of the 
character of the elements; violent and tumultous they swelled within my breast. 

1 had not seen my wife for a week; I rarely gave her a thought, but when these 
thoughts did come, they were of the most intense hatred and bitterness. I was now 
thinking of her, a heavy clap of thunder reverberated through the dark and dreary- 
halls of the old house ; a flash of light played upon the portrait of my dead uncle, 
hanging upon the opposite wall. At this moment 1 heard a low creak of the door 
upon its hinges. Soft, muffled footsteps fell upon the carpet and gradually grew 
nearer my arm-chair. Gently, a hand was placed upon my shoulder ; softly a voice 
almost whispered the words: 

"Pierre, do you still love me? Have I done anything that displeases you? What 
would you have me do? — 1 love you, my soul cries out for you in my loneliness, — 
why do you avoid me?" 

1 slowly turned my eyes from the fire into which I had so long been gazing, and 
looked towards my wife, standing at my side. Almost contrite, my hand sought hers ; 
words of repentance were coming to my lips, — I looked into tier calm and beautiful, 
but sorrow-stricken face, — full into her eyes! 

As an enraged and tormented lion springs upon his keeper, so I sprang with all 
of my might upon my wife. " 'Tis the eye — the eye — the eye — the gray eyes!" I 
screamed in satanic rage. "Out of here, thou demoness of hell, out-out-out-out, or 1 
shall kill thee!" 1 again shrieked. 

Stupefied and fear-stricken, Lorene remained immovable in her tracks. Exasper- 
ated, I seized a dagger lying upon the mantel, and hurled it at her with all my 
strength, passing through the side of her left eye and shattering the portrait of her 
father on the other side. A jet of blood shot from her eye, and, as she quickly turned, 
a cross, ruddy and seething was formed upon the carpet. When she had reached the 
door, she turned, with her hand at her wounded eye, and spoke to me very calmly : 

"Pierre, you have failed to remember, 'The eye is the seat of the will and tin 
transmitter of thoughts.' I forgive you; I love you still." 

Wretched, more melancholy, I again took my seat and resumed my craze into 
the slowly dying fire. But the eye! — the eye! — everywhere I looked, I saw that 
despised gray eye. In the grate, on the floor, on the walls, I could see nothing but that 
eye, that ever-gleaming, that cold, crystalline gray eye. All throughout the dreary 
night, I paced the floor, I wrung my hands, cried, screamed, shrieked, — and still noth- 
ing but — that eye. I shut my eyes tight, I clenched my fingers until the nails sank 
deep into the flesh, — but still that ever-present eye was before my vision. I was going 
mad ! 

jfe Jfe JjfC j|£ jfc 3|£ jfe 

The next morning, the old servant came in and very briefly told me that my wife 
was dead, and that the body had been prepared for burial that day. Without a word, 
1 motioned her out of the room, and sat down to my reflections. 

* * * * * ■*• * 

I was in my room, still sitting before the fire-place; the fire having long gone out. 
My clothes were wet, torn, and muddy ; my hair was wet and bedraggled. Near m\ 
chair there was a muddy spade and mattock; on the mantel was a case of surgeon's dis- 
secting instruments, which the officers had found on me with the tools near the grave 
of my exhumed wife. 

As I regained consciousness, I was silently and very steadily gazing first from 
the officers, who were examining the cross upon the carpet, to that of a large, crystal- 
like, gray eye which I held within my hand. 

P. E. R., 'i 3 . 
267 



11 ■' 




i ' 



j I 




268 




269 



llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllLf 

1 Mississippi Agricultural 
1 and Mechanical College 

I ORGANIZED 1880 

| OBJECT | 

To promote the liberal and practical education of the masses. Five E 

E separate and distinct courses — the Agricultural, the Mechanical, the '"■ 

E Textile, the General Science, and that of Industrial Pedagogy, Theo- E 
E retical instruction in each course, supplemented by the practical work in 

E field, garden, shops, and laboratories. E 

| CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION | 

~ Applicants must be sixteen years of age and of good character. 

= Entrance requirements for admission to the Freshman Class shall be five ;-- ; 

E units — one unit being the equivalent of one subject taken for five hours E 

per week for at least thirty-six weeks. Three units shall be required E 

E from the following groups: — English, one unit; History, one unit; E 

E Mathematics, one unit. Two additional units must be selected from the - 

E following groups and subjects; — E 

E Group I. English — Composition, Rhetoric, Literature. 5 

Group II. History — English, General, Greek and Roman. E 

E Group III. Mathematics — Algebra, Plane Geometry, Trigonometry. 

Group IV. Foreign Language — German, Greek, French, Latin, E 

E Spanish. r : 

Group V. Sciences — Agriculture, Botany, Chemistry, Physiology, I 

E Physics, Physical Geography, Zoology. ~ 

Those who have not fully completed these studies may enter the Prepara- E 

E tory Department, provided they are not in reach of a high school. ; : 

| EXPENSES | 

s The average cost of board per month for the last session was $7.10. 5 

E The cost of uniform, board, books, furniture, etc., for the entire session E 
= is about $135.00. Many students earn enough by labor in the farm and 
E garden to reduce their expenses below $100.00. 

CORRESPONDENCE IS CORDIALLY INVITED. 1 

The College has dormitory accomodations for 800 students, and its E 

E equipment for literary, scientific, and practical, is varied and excellent. ~ 

= Address all communications to the President or Secretary, postofRce : E 

[ AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, MISS. | 

I J. C. HARDY, President. A. J. MOORE, Secretary. | 

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270 



PROBLEMS 

If an engine approaches a station at the rate of 70 miles per hour, and the wind 
is blowing the smoke at right angles to the engine, what time of day is it ? 

If a Corliss engine runs at 5,000 r. p. m. at A. & M. College, how long will it 
take the engineer to draw his pay? 

If a smokestack is 100 feet high and the velocity of smoke through the chimney 
is at the rate of 40 feet per second, the boilers used being horizontal return-tubular, 
what is the name of the fireman? 

If the beetle is of the order, . Coleoptera ; and the Crocodile is of the branch, 
Chordata; to what order and branch does the bed-bug belong? 

A farmer lives 10 miles from a railroad ; plants one acre in corn, one acre in 
wheat, and one acre in oats, what is the condition of the Pope? 
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Boys Don't Forget Us 

When Wanting 

SODA WATER 

CANDY CIGARS 

GROCERIES or DRY GOODS 



Fresh supplies of DELICACIBS 
always on hand for College Boy 

D. A. CLARDY 

STARKVILLE, MISS. 



H. A. Carroll & Co. 1 

Wall Paper, 
Paints, Oils, 
Art Material I 



Everything for the Painter. Paper Hanger 
and Artisan 

332 Main St. Memphis, Tenn. 5 



Crane Steel Valves and Fittings 



Especially adapted for high pressure, satturated and superheated 
steam lines, and extreme hydraulic service. We make everything in steel 

from I '4 inch valves to enormous headers or manifolds. 

We carry in stock an extensive line of steel valves, screwed and 
flange fittings in straight sizes, and are prepared to fill orders with 
reasonable promptness for large steel valves or fittings. Reducing 
fittings ami special fittings. 

SEND FOR SPECIAL STEEL CATALOG NO. 7 



CRANE COMPANY 



ESTABLISHED 1855. 



CHICAGO 



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271 



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DRAWING 
MATERIALS 



Civil Engineering Instruments 
Draftsmen's Supplies 



Write for Catalogue 



| A. S. ALOE CO. 

E No. 513 Olive Street 

| ST. LOUIS, MO. 

E The Leading House of the United States 




We offer graduates special inducements on 
DIETZGEN Engineering Instruments 



Write 

for 
Catalogue 

and 
Particulars 



EUGENE DIETZGEN CO. 

NEWORLEANS, LA. 




WHETHER STUDENT or ALUMNUS 1 

You should be posted on Electrical Apparatus and know who makes the jj~ 

best kinds for different purposes. E 

Perhaps it's not possible for you to visit our factories, but we want s 

you to become familiar with our products. E 

We make a specialty of manufacturing Complete Equipments for - 

Light and Power Stations. E 

Our Meters, Alternators, Generators, Transformers, Switchboards, p : 

Motors, etc., are used in some of the finest installations all over the E 

country and have established for us a national reputation for quality. - 

We won't attempt here to tell all their strong points; their ex- E 

elusive advantages — the features that make them superior to others, or = 

show why they last longer, do their work better and require fewer re- ,™ 

pairs, but we have some interesting illustrated Bulletins on each subject E 

that go into details on these points. ~ 

These Bulletins are free and we will be glad to furnish you with i: 

any you deside. E 

FORT WAYINE ELECTRIC WORKS § 

of General Electric Company — 

MAIN OFFICE: Fort Wayne, Ind. FACTORIES: Fort Wayne. Ind., and Madison. Wis. - 

SALES OFFICES: = 
Atlanta Cleveland Grand Rapids New York 
Boiton Dallas Kansas City New Orleans 
Cincinnati Denver Madison Pittsburg 
Chicago Detroit Milwaukee Philadelphia 



Seattle Syracuse 

St. Paul Yokohama, 

St. Louis Japan 

San Francisco 



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272 



^ss^s^^ Reveille- l©l&^^a^^ 

Two trains on Illinois Central running at the rate of 75 miles per hour have a 
head-on collision, no one injured, but the conductor on rear car was killed, when will 
the Legislature of Mississippi make an appropriation for the Colleges? 

If the town clock of Starkville points out twelve o'clock and the College time is 
eleven forty-five, what time will the concrete walk between the two places be finished ? 

If a boy 9 years old gets tired of holding his baby sister, who weighs 15 pounds, 
in ten minutes, how long will it take a man 21 years to get tired of holding somebody 
else's sister who weighs 120 pounds. 

If the flea belongs to the order, Siphonaptere ; and the electric-light bug belongs 
to the order, Hemiptera; sub-order, Hetroptra ; family, Belostonidae ; to what order 
and family does the Boll Weevil belong, and what remedy would you suggest for 
catching a Siphonaptera? 
JllllllligillllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIBIIIIIIIIIIIIilllllllllllllMllllllllilllSlilillllllllllllllllllllllllHIII^ 

1 FAIRBANKS-MORSE 
I =OIL ENGINES = 

S furnish cheap, reliable power for Cotton Ginn- 

— in*. Feed and Grist Mills. Manufacturing Plants. 

ZZ Etc. Operate successfully on kerosene or oils 

ZZ as low grade as 39 degrees distillate. 

= Oil Tractors, 15-25 H. P. and 30-60 H. P. 

E We build engines from 1 to 500 H. P. 

S Write for Catalog No. 4LI69S. stating type of 

engine and horse power desired. 

I Fairbanks, Morse & Go. 




THE NEW 
CHILES 

HOTEL 

R. H. CHILES, Manager 
Rates $2.00 and $2.50 per day 

Hot and Cold Baths 
Free Sample Rooms 
Bus at All Trains 
College Boys always 
WELCOME 
STARKVILLE - - MISS. 



City Barber Shop | 

First Class Work = 

GUARANTEED = 



Best located SHOP m town for 

COLLEGE BOYS 

Alexander & IVier, 'Proprietors 



- I OMRAPn IR0N w R KS AND SUPPLY COMPANY 
= LUlTlDAKU AGUSTA, • • • GEORGIA 



Foundry, Machine and Boiler Works and Mill Sup- 
ply Store, Engines, Boilers, Bridges, Roofs, Tanks, 
Tower and Building Construction; Cotton. Saw, 
Grist, Oil. Fertilizer, Cane and Shingle Mill Ma- 
chinery and Repairs; Bui'ding, Bridge, Factory, 
Furnaee and Railroad Castings; Railroad and Mill 
Supplies: Belting, Packing, Injectors, Fittings, Saws, 
Files. Oiler9, Etc.: Shafting, Pulleys and Hangers. 

Cast every day. Capacity tor JO0 hands. 

BOILERS 

Engines, Korting and Leader Injectors, Turbine 

Water Wheels, Etc. High Grade Mill Boilers 

Bui!t to Hartford Specifications a specialty. 

WRITE US BEFORE YOU BUY. 



LEWIS MERCANTILE CO. 1 

....Wholesale.... = 

Fruit - Produce | 

...and... 

Agricultural Seeds | 



701 Ohio St. 



Cairo, Illinois E 



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273 



imiiiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiimiiimiiiiiiiin 




OLLEGE 

NNUALS 



HAMMERSMITH 
ENGRAVING CO. 



Designers, Engravers 
and Printers of : : 



College Annuals 

OFTHE BETTER GRADE 



Consult our Advisory 
Board regarding the 
plans of your Year 
Book :::::: 



HAMMERSMITH 
ENGRAVING CO. 



\ 



116 Michigan Street 

MILWAUKEE 



501 South Dearborn Street 

CHICAGO 



274 




STUDENTS ROOM 

sjiimMiiiiiimiiiiiiiiimiiiiiimiiiimiimim iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiBiiEiBiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiisiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiieniiii^ 

| A. H. FETTING | 

= Manufacturer of 5 

| Greek Letter Fraternity Jewelry 1 

| 213 N. Liberty St. - : - Baltimore, Md. I 

E Factory: 212 Little Sharp St. = 

E Memorandum package sent to any fraternity member through the ■£ 

E secretarj' of the chapter. E 

Special designs and estimates furnished on class pins, rings, medals, ; 

E for athletic meet, etc. S 

?1llllllllllllllll!Mllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli: 

275 



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1 PROMPT MEMPHIS SHIPMENTS j 

Electrical Supplies and Apparatus 1 

= for = | 

Central Station and Telephone Work 1 

E Complete Stock. ::: Correct Prices E 



ELECTRIC SUPPLY COMPANY 

Memphis, ------ Tennessee 



Royal "C" Brand Fertilizer. Red Band 16% Acid Phosphate, 

The very best fertilizers for our lands. Time tried and soil 

tested. Goods that our Fathers have used and approved. 

For 30 years the standard by which fertilizers have 

been measured. Once tried, always used. 

"Fry them once and you will always 

insist on having them. 



E Manufactured by E 

[ THE JACKSON FERTILIZER CO. [ 

JACKSON, :: :: :: MISSISSIPPI | 

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276 



jiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiii mi ilium n imu 



Opposite East Entrance Court House 

3(ob Office 

^rogramg 

3ntutations< 

©tatting Carbs 

ano all Jfancp printing a g-prcialtp 



Ad. in .Mess Hall: Mr. M. Please calls 
at room No. 44s immediately after sup- E 
per, and build banister for top story bed. = 
Signed, L. G. C. E 



Two Preps from the piney woods at j 
A. & M. College: 

First Prep: "Say, Jawn, give me aj 
chaw of terbacaw." 

Second Prep: "I ain't got no 'baccer, 
but I got some of the finest pine-rosum 
you ever set your teeths in." 



ELECTRIC APPLIANCE COMPANY 

C. ROBERT CHURCHILL, President and General Manager 

ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT 
OF EVERY CHARACTER 



205-7-9 Chartres St. 



New Orleans, U. S. A. 



GERMICIDES 



INSECTICIDES - DUSTICIDES 



For your HOME, BARN or STOCK :: \ 

....WRITE US YOUR TROUBLES.... [ 

Frederick Disinfectant Company 

MANUFACTURING CM EM I STS 

ATLANTA, .... GEORGIA : 

WHAT SHE WANTED. 

They had been married but two ■ 

months, and they still loved each other i 

devotedly. He was in the back yard j 

blacking his shoes. "Fritz," she called i 
at the top of her voice. 

"Fritz" came to her quick, for he i 

knew that she was in imminent danger, j 

He grasped a coal shovel and rushed up ■ 

the two flights of stairs to the rescue. He : 

entered the room breathless, and found i 
her looking out of the window. "Look, " 

said she, "That's the kind of hobble I ; 
want you to get me." 
illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllh 



1 College Boys Supplies 



We 're Your 
FRIENDS 



I Gladney&Cunninham 



277 



i!lll!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllll!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 




Fleming 
Harrisburg 



Engines 



Are selected by critical and competent judges be- 
cause of their' HIGH ECONOMY and LOW 
OPERATING COST. Look beyond the initial 
investment and examine into the SAVING in your 
COAL PILE. Let us submit GUARANTEED 
engineering data. 



Harrisburg - Foundry & Machine Works 

HARRISBURG, PA., U. S. A. 



^ INTEGRITY SHOWS NO FAVORS * 

The poor man's pennies are as safely guarded as the rich man's 
millions, and, as integrity is the guiding principle of this Bank, depositors 
can trust their funds to our care with absolute safety. 

Our officers are bonded; we carry burglar insurance. 

4% paid on savings accounts and certificates of deposit. 

Your account is cordially invited. 

Your business is treated in confidence. 

DIRECTORS 

John B. Kennard, Geo. S. Turner, Horace Cunningham, J. H. Smith, 

Julian J. (Till, W. N. Logan, A. E. Rush, Jr. 



Merchants & Farmers Bank 



STARKVILLE, 



MISSISSIPPI 



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278 



-IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIIIIIIIIIIillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIIII!: 



Lime •£ Hydrated Lime 

Ground Limestone 
Cement £• Sewer Pipe 

Rubber Roofing 
Flue Pipe £• FireBrick 



No order too small or 
too large for us to nandle. 



— WRITE. WIRR OR PHONE FOR PRICES 



Fischer 
Lime & Cement Co* 

Memphis, Tennessee 



Ad. in Mess Hall : Left in book-store, 
Senior's "Diamond Necklace." 
Freshman : "I didn't know the Senior's 
.•ore Diamond Necklaces." 



Commandant to "Red" M in gee at 
recitation in Military: "Mr. Mingee, 
please tell us the proper attitude of a 
soldier?" 

"Red": "Stand in a perpendicular 
position, throw the feet out at an angle 
of 1 80 degrees, rare the head back until 
the chin is parallel to the back-bone, and 
assume an expression like Dr. Ma- 
gruder's when a visitor makes a long 
speech at Chapel." 



Someone said that the reasons why 
Mitchell — so resembles a Berkshire hog 
were : he has a characteristic nose, a 
dished face, no neck, but possessess an 
enormous barrel, a great capacity for 
food, an everlasting appetite, and a good 
squealer. 



NEW ORLEANS, LA 
Magazine and 



gSs?.: H. W. Johns-Manville Company 



BIRMINGHAM. ALA. 
606 Chamber of Commerce 
Building. 



ASBESTOS AND MAGNESIA PRODUCTS 

Keystone Hair Insulator — for Sound Deadning and Insulation, Asbestos 
Shingles, Asbestos Lumber, Packing, Asbestucco, Water- 
proofing, Cork, Asbestos and Regal Roofing, 

Pipe Coverings, Cold Storage Insulation. 
ELECTRICAL DEVICES AND SUPPLIES 



DALLAS. TEXAS 
915-17-19 Camp Street 



H. W. Johns-Manville Company 



HOUSTON. TEXAS 
1108 Scanlon Building 



JULIAN J. GILL 

Corner 



irug 



tore 



Starkville, 



Mississippi 



Fine Jewelry 

Huyler's Candies 

Kodacks and Kodack 

Supplies 

,* 

MEET ME AT GILL'S' 



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279 



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1 Charlottesville Woolen Mills | 

I CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA | 

S Manufacturers of E 

1 High Grade | 

Uniform Cloth \ 

I ARMY, NAVY, LETTER CARRIER, POLICE, | 

and RAILROAD PURPOSES, I 



And the Largest Assortment and Best Quality of 

Cadet Grays 

Including those used at the United States Military Academy at West 
Point, and other leading military schools of the country. Pre- 
scribed and used by the Cadets of the Mississippi 
Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

<2 



;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiihiiiiiiit 



2<iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiigiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

| FELLOWS, DON'T FORGET JACK | 

| When you need Any Kind of Pennant or Anything in the = 
COLLEGE NOVELTY LINE = 



— He is a Freind of the Boys. 



C/^^ 



Mail orders promptly attended to. 5 



| JACKSON &, SON'S PHARMACY | 



= STARKVILLE, 



MISSISSIPPI = 



The "Behind-In-English" Junior's 
Prayer : — 

Our "Billy," who art in English, 
hallowed be thy whiskers, thy English 
come, thy will be done in the section 
room as it is in the Chapel; give us this 
day a pass even as we pass our essays, 
and lead us not into the Commandant's 
office, but deliver us from the Profs of 
the Sophomores; for thine is the English, 
the Science Course, and the signing of 
the permits for ever and ever, Amen. 



Col. Musgrave (in Tactics): "Mr. 
Saul, what is the difference between in- 
fant and infantry ?" 

Saul: "Well-er, the infant is the dis- 
turber of the peace, and the other he de- 
fends it." 



Armstrong always misses his dinner on 
Thursday. — Clinics. 

Dupree wants to know what 9 lbs. of 
steam weighs. 



Snterstatr Clectrtc 
Company iltt», 

I 

Jobbers and Retailers 

Electrical Supplies 

Telephone and Telegraph 
Instruments 

Electric Lighting Fixtures 

Automobile and Ignition 
Supplies 



A Largest and Best Equipped Estab- 
S lishment of its Kind in Existence 

= NEW ORLEANS, L\ U. S. A. 



GOODMAN BROTHERS 1 

Head -to -Foot = 

OUTFITTERS 

Pleasant Clerks and Reasonable Prices ■; 
Students Always Welcome. 



STARKVILLE, 



MISSISSPPI = 



R. S. RIVES 

Livery and Feed Stable 

STARKVILLE, MISS. 

Hacks Meet All Trains, also Transfer Baggage. 

Terms Moderate. Business Solicited. 

Polite and Attentive Drivers and Firs! Class 

Turnouts for Country Trips. 



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281 



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I WHEN IN NEED OF VALVES | 



fEU, 




fZM 




for steam, water, pas, oils, and the like, the 
highest degree of efficiency will be obtained 
by installing the genuine. 

JENKINS BROS. VALVES 

which always bear the Trade Mark shown in 
the cut. They are made of the best grade of 
steam metal in various styles and sizes. They 
are extra heavy, very strong, well propor- 
tioned, handsomely finished, and most durable. 
Write us when in need of high grade valves 
of am kind. 



JENKINS BROS. 



= New York 



Boston 



Philadelphia 



Chicago = 



HALL 

STEAM PUMP 

COMPANY 

n 

STEAM AND POWER 

Pumping Machinery 
...and... 

Air Compressors 



Galveston Avenue 
PITTSBURG, PA. 



Bon- Ton Cafe 1 



Manuel Mitchell 



Proprietor — 



HOME-MADE 
CANDIES 
OYSTERS 
AND FISH 



Meals Served at All Hours = 



STARKVILLE 



MISSISSIPPI = 



illllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllEIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIililllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllT 

282 



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F. S. JACKSON 

...Ct)f... 







Thoroughly Equipped 

for all lines of the 

Business 

COLUMBUS, MISSISSIPPI 



PHOTOGRAPHER FOR 1912 REVEILLE 



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283 



^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiigiiiiigiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!: 

The Reyburn Manufacturing Company f 



PAPER SPECIALTIES 
TAGS - TICKETS - LABELS 



Allegheny Ave. and 23rd St. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



CAN FURNISH YOUR OTTT T 1V/I A 1VT THE BEST FURNITURE 

ROOM COMPLETE ijl 1 l^i^lVl /\1>I FOR THE LEAST MONEY 



Furniture and Undertaker 

EVERYTHING DELIVERED TO THE COLLEGE 



"PHONE 154 
MASONIC TEMPLE uiccicfiiupi 

BUILDING STARKVILLE, MISSISSIPPI 



| SOUTHERN SEWER PIPE COMPANY | 

| MANUFACTURERS E 

E Vitrified Sewer Pipe. Double Strength Culvert Pipe. ~ 

E Fire Clay Flue Lining. Farm Drain Tile. Wall Coping. E 

is Chimney Pipe and Tops. Thimbles, Fire Brjck and Fire Clay. E 

E WRITE US FOR LITERATURE AND PRICES = = E 



= Address P. O. Drawer 9 1 6. ::: Birmingham, Alabama E 



"NONOISE DESKS" 1 

Combine comfort, noiselessness, with exceptional ~ 

excellence of materials and workmanship. ::: ::: ~ 



m ^HEY J RE GENUINELY QOOT> E 




THE A. H. ANDREWS = 
COMPANY I 

115-117 S. Wabash Avenue | 

Chicago, Illinois i 

rillllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllligilllllllllllllllllllllllMlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 

284 



_>■ 1 3 ■ 1 • 1 1 1 1 1 9 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 1 9 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 a li 1 1 Ill gillll!IIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIII!ll!l>- 



ecurttj) ^)tate 33anfe 



STARKV1LLE, MISSISSIPPI 



Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits 
$85,000.00 



BANKING 

We conduct a general business in a safe and 

conservative manner and give careful 

attention to small accounts 

as well as large ones. 



OFFICERS 

W. W. MACGRUDER, Pre* T. B. CARROLL, V 1C e-Pres. 
WIRT CARPENTER, Cashier. H. P. CASTLES, Ass't Cashier. 



AN UP-TO-DATE STOVE 

Do you realize there is no longer any reason why you should 
use a Coal Range ? 

( )il is cheaper than Coal; it is lighter and easier to handle, 
and gives an intense heat. 

Provided you have the right stove, oil is more economical, 
cleaner, and less trouble. 

HAVE YOU SEEN THE 

New Perfection Wic\ Blue Flame 

OIL COOK STOVE 



- Every dealer everywhere; if not at yours, write for Descriptive £ 

^ Circular to the nearest agency of the E 

I STANDARD OIL COMPANY 

1 INCORPORATED | 

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285 



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Cillcp 
College 
SHriformsf 



ARE the recognized 
Standard for the lead- 
ing military schools and 
colleges in America every- 
where. Highest quality 
cloths, linings, trimmings, 
etc., are combined with 
expert military tailoring in 
your Lilley uniforms, and 
insure you permanent satis- 
faction. 

See Lilley uniforms in 
our new College Catalog 
No. 60, which we will 
send free promptly upon 
request today. 

Jl DDR ESS 




1 THE M. C. LILLEY & CO. 



COLUMBUS, OHIO 



Lost — One regulation cap. size 11- 
1/9, shaped like a goods box, minus an 
eagle and sweat band, well ventilated 
on the sides, bill bent to one side and 
somewhat greasy, a piece of sea-grass 
cord from button, and my name and 
room-number in top. Will give a re- 
ward for its return if I can borrow 
the money. 

(Signed) Treen. 

"Get busy Prep. You've looked 
through the bonk, now ask her if she 
thinks it will rain tomorrow?" 



Dixie Bargain House § 

We carry a splendid assortment of ~ 

Clothing, Hats and Gents Furnishings s 

Always a full stock of the Celebrated 7 

WALK-OVER SHOES 

Both In high and low-quarters on hand. — 

L. & H. A. KLEBAN l 

STARKVILLE, :: :: :: MISSISSIPPI I 



| Wier Jewelry Company 

S A CHOICE and COMPLETE STOCK of 

| Silverware 

5 Jewelry 

= Clocks 

S Watches 

| Fobs 

1 Pins 

E and 

College 
s Novelties 



— Prompt and efficient attention given to 

REPAIR WORK 

= Starkville, North side Main St. Miss. 



M. ROSSOFF 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 

the Beacon Shoe 




"Will you be so kind as to tell me 
win i that man is with the "Baby" face 
and "Auburn" hair, and who makes as 
much noise as seven motor-cycles 
when he talks?" 

"Sure, that's Edgar." 

"And who is that demure little man 
with the frizzled top, who talks very 
soft and low, and tries to get I. 1. & 
C. girls for his sponsor?" 

"Oh, that's Hughey." 

"Now tell me who it was that a 
Starkville young lady named a pig 
after?" 

"That's none of your business." 



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286 



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| SPECIAL TRANSFORMERS 1 

~ 1 to 300 volls in 1 volt setps a 

= We give particular attention to Special Apparatus = 

a for Schools, Colleges and Electrical Laboratories = 



Write 
for 


-P ^ 


~y • w ^~'-Z-^S^i£^^SSi 


Let 

I us 


price 
list 
and 
data 


HR@H KM 


quote 

\ou 

on 

your 


sheet 


IHI^wb^KIu 


requirements 


on 




1 TV i / III 


for 


Standard 

PEERLESS 

TRANSFORMERS 






special 

transformers 

for 


for 
Lighting |i 
and 


fi^^^^tBfi^H v^i^d^H 


, any 

and 

all 


Power 


^^^^B % 


purposes 




Portable Testing set 20000 Volts 





= " 



THE ENTERPRISE ELECTRIC CO. 1 

WARREN, OHIO = 

Transformers of All Kinds for All Purposes" | 



rHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIillllllllllillSHililHIIIIIIiiilBBHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIr 

287 



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q 



CLASS PINS 
VISITING CARDS 

WEDDING 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 
and INVITATIONS 

MODERN 
ADVERTISING 
NOVELTIES 
ART CALENDARS 
STEEL ENGRAVED 
and HAND PAINTED 

PHOTO EN- 
GRAVING and 
HALF TONE WORK 
PHOTOGRAVURE 
LITHOGRAPHING 



ENGRAVER :: PRINTER :: STATIONER 

Commencement Invitations, Dance Invitations 
Programs, Menus, Fraternity Inserts and Stationery 
i facilities tor turning out College Publications. Special rates to Fraternitit 
lss Committees. Before ordering elsewhere, compare Samples and Prices. 
SPECIAL DESIGNS SUBMITTED FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS. 



E. A. WRIGHT BANK NOTE CO. 

BANK NOTE AND GENERAL ENGRAVERS 
STOCK CERTIFICATES, BOND & SECURITES of MONEY VALUE 

[ENGRAVED ACCC RUING TO STOCK EXCHANGE REQUIREMENTS] 

Diplomas, Checks, Bills of Exchange, Drafts and Railroad Passes 
llOS CHESTNUT STREET - - - PHILADELPHIA 



THE YOUNG & VANNSUPPLYCO 



1725-27-29-31 FIRST AVENUE 



BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



MILL - MINE - FURNACE 
SUPPLIES 



R K. & F. L. WIER 

DRUGGISTS AND BOOKSELLERS 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

PENNANTS and COLLEGE NOVELTIES 
ZNjinnallx) 's Fine Candies 

We receive frequent shipments by express and our 
Candies are always fresh. 



Kodaks, Cameras, and all Supplies for Amateur 
Photographers, at Catalogue Prices. 



R K. & F. L. WIER 

STARKVILLE, MISS. 



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^iiiiiiiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

= Established 1868 Incorporated 1890 

| J. & M. SCHWABACHER, Limited 

= Wholesale GROCERS, IMPORTERS 

= and COMMISSION MERCHANTS 



IIIIIIIIIBIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 



-SPECIALTIES- 

Coffee, Sugar, Molasses, Rice and Tea 

Cor. Magazine and I'oydras Sts. 
NEW ORLEANS, :::"ZI::: LOUISIANA 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIL: 

listabliihed 1X92 5 



Stephen Lane Folger 1 



180 BROADWAY 



NEW YORK = 



MANUFACTURING 

JEWELER 

Club and College Pins and Rings 
Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals 



| Sanitary Barber Shop 

= T>. C. .MORTON, 'PROPRIETOR 
= 'OMLY FIRST-CLASS WHITE 

Barbrr ^t)op 

in Staikville 
= College {B°ys ore especially Welcome 
| STARKV1LLE, :: :: :: MISS. 



We wish a rule could be passed 
prohibiting the use of the same "nick 
name" by more than one Cadet, as 
this is a source of much annoyance at 
times. 

For instance. "Doc" S. and "Doc" 
T. were walking by the Chapel, arm 
in arm. when a lady called from the 
top of the steps: — 

"Doc." won't you please tie my 
shoe-lace?" 

As they did not know which one 
she meant, both responded to aid the 
lady in lur disiress. Perhaps you have 
noticed they don't speak to each other 
now. There's a reason. Ask "Doc." 



LAU NDRY. SUPPLIES 

:: For Schools and Colleges Throughout the South :: 



\Y/^E HAVE recently bought the Crown Laundry 
Supply Company, of Nashville, and have in- 
creased the slock, placing us in better condition than 
ever before to give the trade good service. 

Mr. C. H. Yarbrough is still in charge of onr 
Nashville Branch and will be glad to have your orders. 



National Aniline & Chemical Co. 



Nashville, Tennessee. 
No. 158 Second Ave. North. 



Cincinnati, Ohio. 
No. 232 East Pearl St. 



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289 




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